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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!  RSS feed

 
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I just tried to cheat, ran it through Google Image Search. It says "adjustable spanner."  Lame guess google, no apples for you! Google is not a tool using animal!
 
Pearl Sutton
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Digging though pictures, looking for ideas.. Found this thing, looks like a hazardous item, with that blade waving around...


It claims to be a Flex Duct Cutter for Fiberglass
How does that work? Anyone know? Looks to me like the blade swings up and down, cutting both directions, with the mouth holding some part still. I could think of some interesting uses for it. Curious how it's meant to be used. And, as usual with a WTF tool, I want it.. That looks misuse-able :)
 
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Brian, I thought it might be for cutting linoleum back in the day when that was a common flooring, it was not real thick.  My first thought was for asphalt shingles, though they might be too thick.

It reminds me of using a box cutter with handles. Looks like it had a box cutter type blade.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Ok, narrowing it down. The picture is rotated. When I rotated it to see how it looks, it slides along on the metal edge, and cuts something mean when it gets to it. Lumber strap, or something like that?

 
Anne Miller
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Pearl, for that tool the details are:

Finely honed double edged knife blade cleanly pierces through the outer skin, insulation and liner construction of flexible round duct and cuts in either direction.

Thumb operated latch opens the tool's compound leverage handles and the jaws of a built-in wire cutter to easily sever the exposed wire rib coil of the duct liner

 
Pearl Sutton
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Anne Miller wrote:Pearl, for that tool the details are:

Finely honed double edged knife blade cleanly pierces through the outer skin, insulation and liner construction of flexible round duct and cuts in either direction.

Thumb operated latch opens the tool's compound leverage handles and the jaws of a built-in wire cutter to easily sever the exposed wire rib coil of the duct liner


So it's just a double edged knife with a wire cutter on it? The blade doesn't do it's job with any motion of the jaws? Oh that's weird.
 
Anne Miller
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Not ever having cut duct work this may seem strange (or at least I haven't cut any.)  So I am not sure what they mean by "exposed wire rib coil of the duct liner".

What I am visioning is a "tube" with a wire inner core and insulation as the outer core. Like this:




Does this help?
 
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This is the photo of my latest eBay purchase.  This is the ONLY photo the seller attached to the listing.  I'm sure one or two folks here will recognize it.


The seller didn't realize what a sweetheart he had here, (I didn't until I opened the box) that plus the one crappy photo and almost no description is probably why nobody else bid on it and I got it for $75.
 
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This came with a bunch of textile tools.  It may or may not be related to textiles.
IMG_4847.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_4847.JPG]
IMG_4846.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_4846.JPG]
 
Peter VanDerWal
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Also, in reference to the eggbeater drill with the thumb screw chuck, that chuck was pretty common early on for "brace bits" (auger bits with the long square pyramid end). given the low gearing on it, I'd guess it was intended for large diameter bits.  The fact that it has a handle rather than a shoulder brace indicates it was probably used to drill holes close to a wall, floor, etc. where you couldn't lean into it.

Here is a different model with an adjustable chuck and the rather unusual capability to "extend" the chuck out from the body while drilling.  The shaft goes back up through the cage style body.


This is also one of those rare "three handed" drills, although either handle can be removed.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Anne: yeah, that's the stuff. I have cut it before, and there is wire in it. I can't see having a knife blade like that if it doesn't move... if the bit mechanism is just wire cutters. That's why I'm puzzling over it.

Peter: wow. That is a crappy photo. I'm surprised he sold it at all with that. No CLUE what it is :) I'm looking forward to learning!
And I think you win the left handed bacon stretcher one if that kind of chuck was normal for the square bits. If so, I definitely want it, I have square base bits.  Tossing you an apple for the win!

Raven: I bought raw wool, me and mom were fluffing it by hand to stuff into the mattress I made (LOVE IT!!) we wished we had tools like that, sort of. Wonder if they are some odd fluffing things?
 
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Peters picture could be some kind of specialty plane with changeable blades. The ones in the picture could be used for making grooves, maybe? Ravens tools could be used to weave belts? or make some kind of cordage?
 
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raven ranson wrote:This came with a bunch of textile tools.  It may or may not be related to textiles.



Leather puncher? I know there's devices to punch holes as specific intervals in leather so you can sew through said holes. The leather straps also lead me to think it's a leather tool, because I generally make my straps out of yarn or hemp twine or paracord, because I have those around. A leather worker would have leather around.

But, the poke-y parts doen't look very sharp though...Maybe it's just a guide?


EDIT:
Found the thing these reminded me of: Prong Chisel



They poke the holes to sew through as shown in this picture.



Your tool doesn't look quite like that, though, and it looks like the little prongs on yours can slide in and out?

 
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Sorry I'm late to the game.
I have another side to the tool ID I was looking for.
it has a name printed on it: Stanz Cutter
The moving jar has slight serrations on the bottom of the square edge "blade"
Yeah, I need a new camera. The bottom or leading edge of the jaw has teeth shaped sort of like the jaws or plyers.

Stanz-cutter-metals.jpg
[Thumbnail for Stanz-cutter-metals.jpg]
Stanz-cutter-metals-jaw-striations.jpg
[Thumbnail for Stanz-cutter-metals-jaw-striations.jpg]
 
Peter VanDerWal
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Philipp Mueller wrote:Peters picture could be some kind of specialty plane with changeable blades.



Philipp for the win!

It's a Stanley No 45 Combination Plane from the "Sweetheart" era (circa 1919-1935).  The sweetheart era is popular for both collectors and users since it was when Stanley hand tools reached their peak in quality & features.
It has very little rust with over 95% of the original nickel plating intact, and it has all of the original parts (uncommon) including the original screw driver (rare).
If the seller had bothered to take just a 1/2 dozen photos from different angles it would have easily sold for $150-$200 more than I paid.
It even included the original box, although that was pretty much destroyed because they did a lousy job packing it.

Bidding on it was a total gamble on my part that really paid off...this time.

Photo taken from my cell phone:
 
Peter VanDerWal
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Brian, it's a sheet metal "nibbler".  It's designed so you can cut through sheet metal while only needing access to one side.  It cuts out a thin 'kerf' of metal.  The 'teeth' are to make it grab and keep it from pushing back from the metal as they close

I thought that's what it might be, but it was hard to tell from your original photos if it was a nibbler or some kind of bypass sheer.

A word of caution, if you try to use this be aware that the metal kerf will come out in a razor sharp spiral, with your hand so close to the surface, contact between the spiral and your fingers is a possibility.
Most nibblers have longer handles so you hand is further away from this spiral.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Apple for Phillip! YAY!!
Peter, oh cool! That's a much better picture! Glad you got it!

Peter: Apple for you for a nibbler!! YAY!! I agree that's what that is. I have used metal shears like that to deliberately get those evil spirals for some artwork I was making. And yeah, dangerous! I had leather gloves on that took a fair amount of damage before it was finished.
 
Pearl Sutton
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The story on this:
I bought this in 1995 or so in Arkansas, was going back home, via the Memphis airport. This was before TSA, when they ran it though an xray only. I had it in my backpack, they looked at it on xray, and said "Ok, it's not weapons, but if you aren't in a hurry, what IS that? That's neat!!" I showed a bunch of security people this in the Memphis airport, and there was a lot of interesting discussion about it all.  What did I have in my backpack in Memphis? Apples for specific, not general. General is easy.

 
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Nicole Alderman wrote:A measuring spoon collection? Maybe it measures in milliliters rather than teaspoon/tablespoon?


nope.

Scale on that is the box is about 12 - 14 inches wide.
 
Nicole Alderman
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Pearl Sutton
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Nicole Alderman wrote:Fancy-pants serving spoons for various different foods?


That's what I use them for. They are really identifiable serving spoons at parties! No one ever accidentally takes one home.
But why do they look like that, and are in a set like that?
 
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Baby spoons? All the way up to older child?
 
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Are they some sort of commendatory spoon set, for royal wedding?

Maybe for serving tea, with sugar spoons and various berry spoons???
 
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Smelting spoons?
 
Anne Miller
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I never knew there were so many names for spoons  ... Casserole spoons

This one is called: SERVING HOSTESS SET



This is:  DESSERT SERVING SET



This collection has:

Spoons

12 lg dessert/ serving spoons ASH mono
12 tablespoon no mono
12 teaspoon no mono
12 5 o'clock spoons no mono
12 demitasse spoons GW no mono
12 fruit spoons 4 AEM mono 7 BGG mono some light GW
12 iced tea spoons no mono
12 gumbo spoons no mono
11 cream soup spoons 10 no mono 1 R mono 1 GW
12 bullion spoons 4 no mono 4 BGG 4 DEC monogram
12 ice cream sporks no mono GW 1 no GW

 
Nicole Alderman
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Pearl Sutton
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Whole bunch of strikes. But OH WOW I LOVE that silver set!!

Edit:  hahaha, I just realized this may be more evil than I thought, I know what they are, and I can't find a pic on the net :) And I know the right words to look up :)  

I had a guy ask me at thrift store the other day "what do you collect?" I thought on it, said "rust and lace! If it's grubby or ornate, I probably want it!" :)

As far as ornate, I took this picture at an old car museum on route 66, now that's a kitchen scale I want! I don't need a scale that does .5 oz, I need one that does 25 pounds at a whack, and oh MY is that lovely!!



 
Nicole Alderman
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Nicole Alderman wrote:You are evil! You must now repent and for your penance give us 2 hints





I didn't pay for that Evil shirt, one of my men did I tie dyed it though, it was too boring. I think it's the only shirt I own that has text on it.

Hints... Hm...
Replica of very old stuff.
Brought home by a solider after one of the world wars, for his wife, probably. Looking at the date I bought it, probably WW1, would have been an old lady's death that got it sent to an antique store in backwoods Arkansas, where I bought it.

 
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Replica of medieval spoons, purchased in England? Looking at pictures of medieval spoons, they usually had those skinny handles...
 
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Nicole Alderman wrote:Replica of medieval spoons, purchased in England? Looking at pictures of medieval spoons, they usually had those skinny handles...


Closer. Nope.
 
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Spoons to be used as musical instruments???
 
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Mike Barkley wrote:Spoons to be used as musical instruments???


Hahaha!

Apple for the most creative wrong answer!

I'm so not getting my housework done... Having more fun than is legal on Permies tonight.

Started a new thread in Meaningless Drivel Why did you become a permie? and it's being neat...
 
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Did some googling. Hair spoons.
 
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Mike Barkley wrote:Did some googling. Hair spoons.


I had to google that one. Only thing that I saw on my results was similar was and it was labeled as an auction lot of "Antique spoons, buttons, & hair picks"  everything else I saw made me sad that beautiful old silver was being killed... I hate seeing pretty things torn apart.
Not sure if that's what you saw too, but no, not hair spoons.
 
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The little spherical spoon with the long handle looks exactly like a tool I saw someone using recently for sand casting aluminum.  When I saw it I assumed it was some kind of tool designed for the forge, now I'm thinking he stole one of his wife's serving spoons.

Kind of looks to me like it a set of spoons for serving ice cream with individual spoons for sprinkles, nuts, etc.

Either that or they are absinthe spoons for large parties of serious drinkers.
 
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ear spoons?
 
Pearl Sutton
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Peter VanDerWal wrote:The little spherical spoon with the long handle looks exactly like a tool I saw someone using recently for sand casting aluminum.  When I saw it I assumed it was some kind of tool designed for the forge, now I'm thinking he stole one of his wife's serving spoons.


Probably I have a spoon in my tools that I stole out of my own kitchen, it's a cement tool now, works perfectly! Not one of my silver ones

Kind of looks to me like it a set of spoons for serving ice cream with individual spoons for sprinkles, nuts, etc.

 
Nope. Good idea though!

Either that or they are absinthe spoons for large parties of serious drinkers.


Absinthe spoons have slots, you pour your booze over a sugar cube that is in the spoon to dissolve it through the slots. Nope.

I'll let y'all stew on this till sometime tomorrow
Have spoon filled dreams!

Edit: Raven: the box is about 13-14 inches wide. Those would be serious ear spoons for serious ears! Nope.
 
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drat, there goes my idea.

In the interest of silliness, I vote for egg-race spoons because one of them has an image of a chicken on it.  
 
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