• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • r ranson
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Jay Angler
  • Mike Barkley

Foliar spray called Biol?

 
Posts: 23
4
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello banda permie,

There is a foliar spray preparation comonly known in latin america as biol. I have tried to find scientific papers on it, but have only found a few thesis. I want to do a search in english bit dont know how it is called in the anglosphere.

Hoping someone can recognize it, Ill describe how to make it, maybe someone will try it to.

You will need:

. A sealeable 200 l plastic drum.
. An irrigation conection and a rubber seal for it.
. A piece of hose.
. A plastic bottle.
. A piece of wire.
. 50 kg of fresh cow manure.
. 5 l of milk serum
. 5 l of molases.
. 180 l of rain water.
. 2.5 kg of rock flour.
. 2.5 kg of ash.

Drill a hole on the tape and conect the hose using the irrigation conection and rubber seal, it should be airtight. Tie the bottle to the drum and fill it with water.
Mix all the ingedients and stirr. Put the lid on and put the hose inside the bottle so no air can get in but gases can get out (a water seal).

Let it be for 1 to 3 months (depends on climate). If it smells bad like a drain, "bad" microbes colonized it and it will be toxic to plants. It should smell sweet and sour.

We use it in 20 to25% concentration in amaranth and corn.

Good luck

Camilo
 
master steward
Posts: 5364
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1622
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That recipe sounds like compost tea or a compost inoculant. Does this help?

I did a google on the ingredients and came up with some scientific-type pdf's so maybe that might work for you.
 
Triato Vallejos
Posts: 23
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Anne Miller wrote:That recipe sounds like compost tea or a compost inoculant. Does this help?

I did a google on the ingredients and came up with some scientific-type pdf's so maybe that might work for you.



Thanks for your reply. No compost is involved, I dont think we can call it compost tea. It is more like fermented manure or anaerobically digested manure.

Camilo
 
Triato Vallejos
Posts: 23
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
https://www.google.com/amp/s/estoesagricultura.com/super-magro-fertilizante-enriquecido-para-uso-agricola/%3famp

Here is a similar recepi but adding micronutrients mainly in the form of salts. Borax and magnesium sulphate should be separated by three days from each others. Link is in spanish.

 
Triato Vallejos
Posts: 23
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I seem to have found the term you would use to name the cathegory in which biol would fall in english: organic anaerobically fermented foliar fertilizer.

I´ve done a coagulation trial with it by mixing it 1 to 1 with 97% alcohol and found it to be rich in aminoacids wich is a form of N that helps plants be resistant to some insects, I´ve eliminated aphids in alfalfa using it mixed 4 parts biol and 17 parts rainwater with some molases and humic acids applied 3 days appart (dose needed may change acording to soil and plant health).

As said before you can ad micronutrients during the fermentation process. I am not sure but I belive Mn and Fe need to be in reduced forms in order to be usefull tu plants, this recepi should be very reduced with all the molases and anaerobic environment.

I don´t belive there are many microorganisms alive at the endo of the process, but it should have many microorganism carcasses and therefore it should not leach in the soil and would stimulate microorganism growth in the soil (aerobic microorganism growth too if the soil is well aerated). Maybe it contains viable spores of microorganisms and I´ve heard it contains Baciluss subtilis wich is a beneficial facultative (both aerobic and anaerobic).

Hope someone gives it a try.

Camilo
 
I have a knack for fixing things like this ... um ... sorry ... here is a concilitory tiny ad:
100 ways to cut one's personal carbon footprint - in order of tons of carbon
https://permies.com/t/159647/ways-cut-personal-carbon-footprint
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic