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Lacto-fermenting snap peas?  RSS feed

 
Craig Dobbson
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I'm inundated with snap peas at the moment and looking for ways to keep them without steaming up the house. I was thinking about lacto-fermentation as a way to start adding more live food to my diet but can't find any useful info about doing this with snap peas. Has anyone tried to do peas this way? I've got tons of them... buckets full.

Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks
 
Jami McBride
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Lacto fermenting is a super way to deal with the anti-nutrients in veggies as well as adding more beneficial bacteria to our guts. It is said that all health starts in the gut.

Here are a couple of ways you can ferment your snap peas -

#1 basic recipe
enough snap peas to fit in a quart jar, cleaned of course.
4 cloves of garlic, crushed.
2 lemon quarters.
2 tsp. dill seed or cumin if you have an aversion to dill.
2+ cups of brine (3 Tbl fine grain sea salt, or 4.5 Tbl of coarse sea salt & 4 cups of water) this will makes 4cups should you need it.

Pack the peas, garlic, lemons and spice tightly into a wide mouth quart size jar. Pour brine to cover all ingredients, but keep it 1" below the rim of jar. Put in a regular-mouth jar lid sitting on top of mixture to hold ingredients down below the surface of the liquid. Cover the jar tightly with a lid or airlock lid. Leave at room temperature for 2 to 3 days, depending on time of year. Then transfer to cool storage.

#2 more of a pickle
same amount of snap peas as in #1.
4 cloves of garlic, cut in quarters.
1/4 cup whey (hang active culture, plain yogurt, in fine cheese cloth over night to get whey and spreadable yogurt cheese-bonus!)
2+ cups brine (see above).

#3 Time to add some spice?
same amount of snap peas, cleaned.
4 cloves of garlic, cut in quarters.
1/4 cup (or more to taste) grated ginger root or horseradish. Want more....try 1 small hot pepper (jalapeno or other) diced w/seeds. Variation: add 1/4 cup raw honey for a sweet hot.
1/4 cup whey (hang active culture, plain yogurt, in fine cheese cloth over night to get whey and spreadable yogurt cheese-bonus!)
2+ cups brine (see above).

All the best fermenting your bounty!



 
Craig Dobbson
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Thanks! I just finished putting together my first batch of Peas. I used garlic, dill, mustard seed, pepper and a couple cloves. I hope it comes out well. It smelled like a good mix when I was mixing it up so that's a good start.

I'm about to go pick some wild blueberries to mix in with the yogurt cheese. That will work well for bagels and crackers I think.

I used greek yogurt so there was just enough liquid to work with and the cheese is nice and tart. I'm not a fan of yogurt because of the texture but now that it's thick and spreadable, I'm finding it a bit more palatable. Thanks again for your help. I'm excited by the possibilities in this facet of my cooking.

 
Jami McBride
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That's great.

One more thing, I don't know how your hanging your cheese, but be careful hanging from cupboard knobs it can pull some cupboards askew.

Spreadable yogurt cheese has many uses, and it is full of good bacteria. Try putting small clumps on top of nachos (after the heating step), on top of spaghetti or other noodle dishes, or on stir fry just before serving.

And you can increase your ferment batch size, look for those glass cookie jars where the top is as wide as the sides, they hold a gallon. Multiply your recipe x 4 and use a saucer or other object smaller than the lid to sit on your ferment and hold it below the liquid.

 
Craig Dobbson
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I hung it off of a shelf on a hook so the cabinets are nice and safe. As for the batch size I used a half gallon Ball jar in which a small (4oz) mason jar just fits into to keep the peas under the surface. I have alot of peas. Easily enough to fill 8 half gallon jars a week. I'm just doing one for now to see how it works. I've frozen a LOT and thankfully my kids devour them by the fist full raw from the garden so I'm making use of them.
 
Wardeh Harmon
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I posted a basic pickle formula in this thread:
http://www.permies.com/t/16200/cooking-food-preservation-food-choices/Looking-good-dill-pickle-recipe

You can do it with any vegetable, even snap peas. Dress up the jar however you'd like -- garlic, peppercorns, herbs, lemon rind, you name it.
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