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Should I Thin My Miniature Fig Forest?

 
pollinator
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Location: New Braunfels, TX, Zone 8b, multi-generational suburban homestead
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As many of you may know, Texas had a wild, wild winter storm come through last February. Due to this, my very well established fig tree's branches died. I cut them back to allow the new growth to bounce in quickly... and so it has!

But now I have so much new growth I'm not sure what to do with it! Do I leave it all for this first year of growing and thin it in the winter or should I thin it now?

Regardless of when I thin it... how many main branches should I leave? I'm thinking 3 due to the size of ground it is covering. Maybe 2 is better...?
I'm a tree noob, please help :)

Fig-Tree.jpg
[Thumbnail for Fig-Tree.jpg]
 
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Location: Elk Grove, CA
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If your original fig was grafted, then you might be growing from whatever rootstock was used. Regardless, leave it alone for a few years. Let it grow and see what it does. If it doesn’t find its own natural shape that you agree with, wait until winter and prune it towards your desired shape. Figs are very forgiving and easy.

Good Luck!
 
gardener
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are many figs grafted? as easy as it is to propagate them via cuttings, i wouldn’t expect it to be worthwhile to graft...

either way, i agree, just let it do what it wants this year. in my area, you usually expect some winter dieback on figs, so we want as many new stems (i.e. places where fruit can grow) as they’re willing to give us. if it does something funny, you can always prune during the next dormancy.
 
Paul Eusey
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Every named varietal of fig is a grafted tree. Every fig I have ever seen at any Home Depot or Lowe’s or nursery has been grafted. There are a lot of figs in the world that came up from seeds, but few of them are left to grow in yards. So it’s a pretty safe guess that this tree was grafted. If any fruit tree (of any type, apple, stone fruit, etc) is listed as any popular named varietal, it’s a grafted tree. Any named varietal of fruit anyone has ever eaten came from a grafted tree. I like growing fruit trees from seeds because I have no idea what the fruit is going to be. Most of the time, the fruit isn’t very good, but its fun and interesting regardless. There is a very slight chance to get something brand new, that becomes the next great varietal, that I will share with the world via grafted trees. And that is a fun idea because then I get to name it.
 
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I have a fig that just hit year 3, started as a 3' tall plant and is now about 12' tall and 8 feet wide. I would move one of those two plants over a bit, give them 8-10' of space. I don't see a graft on mine, but it's 3-4" thick at the base, maybe whatever was there grew over? Nothing stopping you from getting a third plant, maybe one that fruits at a different time or perhaps the same time so the birds don't get all of them before you do.
 
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