• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Mike Haasl
  • Pearl Sutton
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Burra Maluca
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Carla Burke
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean

Finishing seams that work - without a serger!

 
master steward & author
Posts: 22843
Location: Left Coast Canada
6692
3
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Let's gather some resources for different ways of finishing seams so they don't fray when it's washed.  

 
master gardener
Posts: 2685
1036
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you for posting this, r! I'd completely forgotten the open, sewn edge finish, and didn't know the completely enclosed one was known by that name. The ones I typically use - depending on what I'm making, are the pinked edge, the French, and the flat-felled. I've found that not only in clothes, but in totebags, first aid type sewing (heating pad/ hot water bottle covers, etc), and in filtering bags - like nut bags, reusable bouquet garni, and fruit/herb press bags, a French seam (with the bound edge on the inside, for first aid, or on the outside, for filtering) is my favorite, making cleaning easier on filtering bags and gentle but strong touch, on the first aid items.

The flat-felled seam is strong, neat, and very useful, but not in some seams, for my clothes. In inseams, it can be uncomfortably bulky, and tends to wear out faster, from rubbing, but outseams, side seams, and others like those really seem to benefit from the added strength.
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 22843
Location: Left Coast Canada
6692
3
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've been trying to find the kind of seam that used to be common in handsewing. In my brain, it's like two clasped hands.

The reason it's not used today is that you don't align the seam allowance for both pieces.  

I just wish I could find what it's called so I can search for tutorials.
 
pollinator
Posts: 283
Location: Missouri. USA. Zone 6b
189
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi, Raven, I went through the hand sewing and seam finished sections of the Vogue Sewing book. One that comes close is the self-bound seam.   Do you mean aligning the top and bottom pieces with different SA so no trimming is needed? If you know how to do it but just don't know the name, a few pictures would be helpful.
gift
 
Diego Footer on Permaculture Based Homesteads - from the Eat Your Dirt Summit
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic