• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Steve Thorn

Sunchokes

 
Posts: 8
4
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm thrilled to plant my first line of SUNCHOKES!! Can anyone give me tips on how to garden them? They are one of my first perennials.

I've loved eating them raw in salads, or cooked in "hash" brows 'O Brian. How else do you eat them??
Or store them??

I'll be cooking in a cowboy kitchen, off-grid, all summer, so ideas for that would be great.
20210526_172852.jpg
Jerusalem Artichokes
Jerusalem Artichokes
 
pollinator
Posts: 2438
Location: 4b
626
dog forest garden trees bee building
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I can't tell you how to cook them, because we're still working that out for ourselves, but I can tell you how to grow them.  Get out of the way :)
 
pollinator
Posts: 769
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
114
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Every spring before they sprout and after the ground has thawed, I dig mine up and separate out the big ones for eating and replant the small ones so they aren't overcrowded.

I often cut them up and boil them in acidified water (1 tablespoon of lemon juice per quart of water) for around 45 mins which converts the inulin to simple sugars.

Then I mash / puree them and freeze them in serving sizes for soups.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 3407
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
1298
3
forest garden foraging books food preservation cooking fiber arts bee medical herbs
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like to slice the raw roots up in salads. They work like a sweeter water chestnut. Use them like a condiment until you are sure they don't cause you gastral distress.
 
gardener & author
Posts: 2243
Location: Tasmania
1167
2
homeschooling goat forest garden fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation pig wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've roasted them whole in hot tallow and salt and they are very tasty - just roast until tender, and serve as a side dish, or open them up and top with all your favourite baked potato toppings
 
Let me tell you a story about a man named Jed. He made this tiny ad:
19 skiddable structures microdoc - now FREE for a while
https://permies.com/t/138333/skiddable-structures-microdoc-FREE
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic