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Looking for alternative cooking pots and pans

 
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Location: Utah
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With recent developments regarding research finding teflon and other nasties in the water, I've been thinking more and more about other cooking pans and pots.  I have a few cast iron beauties, but what other alternatives have you all enjoyed and would recommend?  Especially for boiling water, our stainless steel teapot gets nasty and is hard to clean the inside.
 
gardener
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I am a big fan of vintage (pre-1980s) Revere Ware, which sometimes pops up fairly cheap at garage sales.  It's stainless steel inside but has a thick copper bottom to spread the heat uniformly.  Sauce pans and larger cook pots are the ones I'm familiar with; I gather there are sautee pans and such but I've never seen them. The parent company went bankrupt in the 1980s and various subsequent owners of the brand released all kinds of crap under the name, including thin imitations of the original thick-and-heavy pots.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revere_Ware
 
pollinator
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Stainless steel, lasts forever is easy to clean very low maintenance and can't chip rust or flake. If you get one that is pure stainless it will work on induction hobs, mine have encased copper bottoms so will not. I've boiled them dry, forgotten about them for hours used them in the oven, used them on outside fires and the bbq and they still look almost exactly as new 20 years later. (minus a dent where I dropped one) And if you do really manage to burn them you can use pretty much anything to quickly clean them up, acid or alkaline.

how does the teapot get "nasty"? I get it may be a bad shape to get a hand into but stainless it the absolute easiest material to clean since it's so forgiving of your method. That's why it's used in kitchens and sterile environments.
 
pollinator
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Cast iron, I can't beat, second to that  is stainless,  next is glass for me.      I love my vision glass cook ware but it is an artform to know how to cook with it, once you master that it is awesome.
 
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All my pots and pans are Revere Ware, like Dan suggested.  Mine were given to me as a wedding present so they have given me many years of service. Mine were made in Clinton, Illinois.

I have a couple of other stainless pans of quality as I only use stainless steel.

All my frying pans were castiron though I had to give those up due to a health problem because they are too heavy.  So I went back to the Revere Ware frying pans.
 
Jeff Reynolds
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Skandi Rogers No matter how many times I scrub the teapot there is some film that forms on the sides and in the cracks at the bottom.  Then everytime I boil water I end up with that film coming off and a bunch of gross floaties in the water.  It is so annoying and I gave up and just started boiling water in a smaller pot.  Anyway it could be a design flaw with the teapot, maybe I can find another that will not have the same results.  I love how fast the teapot boils water, but cannot use the water coming out of mine.  
 
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our stainless steel teapot gets nasty and is hard to clean the inside.  



Boil some vinegar in them. Removes hard water stains like lime etc. Same thing as when canning jars get cloudy. It's hard water stains aka minerals. We have lime here.
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