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Burned area

 
Jim Lea
Posts: 114
Location: Southern Sierra Nevada's
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At the mouth of our cyn we recently had a fire. Ithe area was dried grass mostly. Some juniper and scrub oak but not much. Zone 8 4500 feet. 18 deg f. in the winter. 12 in. rain. Jan to March. Dry rest of the year. I'm thinking of doing an acre and observe what happens. Not the whole area.
My question to you all is, if I were to try to re-seed it what might be a good mix? A mix of grasses and resumes? Flowers? I'm at a loss. How can I accelerate what nature will do? Also, does starting at the top make sense so next years seed cascades down hill?
If I had a keyline plow I'd get permission and use it.
Any help is much appreciated.
Jim
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Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9416
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
162
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If there is any debris or rocks on the ground, you might be able to rake it into windrows on contour, starting at the top. Put your seeds uphill of each windrow.
 
Jim Lea
Posts: 114
Location: Southern Sierra Nevada's
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Thanks Tyler, I had not thought of that. Easy in place solution. Wind in that part of the canyon IS a problem. I'm sure you see the wind turbines on the picture.
Great idea.
 
Jim Lea
Posts: 114
Location: Southern Sierra Nevada's
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Just wondering.
I'm thinking that focusing on a spot in or near the key point of a draw, might give the best opportunity for seed. Rather than up top. More water likely there.
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
12
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I'd start with early succession flowers like lupine so it also fixes N. It will bring birds which will poop and that has more seeds in it.

Id also try and establish perennial grasses over the regular annuals.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9416
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
162
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Jim Lea wrote:Just wondering.
I'm thinking that focusing on a spot in or near the key point of a draw, might give the best opportunity for seed. Rather than up top. More water likely there.


I think focusing the seeding on the key point is a good idea, but consider going ahead and making some berms further up, to slow run-off so your seeds don't get washed away.

 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
10
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instead of allowing the same old fire prone scrub grow back, why not plant what you would love to eat, or sell, or what the wildlife could eat that would be beneficial..like fruit and nut trees, vines, etc..

I think the idea of raking up the brush into hedgerows and planting in those is a great idea, kinda hugelbeds.

keep us posted on how you do this
 
Jim Lea
Posts: 114
Location: Southern Sierra Nevada's
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You guys have given me some good ideas to go on. I like the ideas of the perennial grasses. I'll choose as many varieties as possible so something might get a toe hold. I don't know how good of a plant poppies are but they do grow well around us. They sure would add some color to an otherwise ugly area.
Brenda I should have been more clear. When I said the mouth of "our" cyn I ment our community cyn. I'm hoping to get a plan together and then present it to the group here and get help in re-establishing some of the burned area. If I get a real good response maybe trees would be an option, but largely this will be an intended area. Broadcast seed and or seed balls and let nature do its thing.

I'm still interested in any and all ideas that members here may have to share. There is a tremendous amount to knowledge represented in this group.

Jim
 
Shawn Harper
Posts: 360
Location: Portlandia, Oregon
7
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My understanding is that a lot of coniferous trees grow well from seed in ash.
 
Jim Lea
Posts: 114
Location: Southern Sierra Nevada's
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Thanks Shawn. Did not know that.
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
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