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Teflon Coated Light Bulbs Deadly to Chickens

 
paul wheaton
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Ryan Barrett
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Oh yeah! I can confirm that! The off-gassing, or whatever comes from heated teflon, is toxic for their little birdy lungs.
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2748/are-teflon-coated-pans-a-health-risk-to-birds-and-humans

My father has "rescue parrots"(he worked at the world bird sancuary in St Louis) and when they came into his home, they had to get rid of all Teflon frying pans and pots!
Scary that GE doesn't mention what the bulbs can do.

-Ryan
 
R Scott
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canary in the coalmine... so to speak.

I have two things left in my house with teflon, and that is only because I cannot find an alternative--my electric pressure cooker and electric rice maker. Both have teflon coated aluminum vessels. I am less worried about them because of the controled heat, but would like to have SS instead. No, I will not give them up--the energy and time savings are way too important to the family. But we are extremely careful about not scratching the teflon or letting them overheat.
 
Lisa Niermann
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Yet another great reason to give those birds a rest when the days get shorter...just as nature intended.
Freeze or preserve your excess summer eggs for use during the winter, if you must have them.
 
Chad Hadsell
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Last Christmas my mother and mother-in-law both gave us a set of those teflon coated sheets meant to go in the bottom of the oven to catch drips and such. They might make cleaning the oven easy, but when a product comes with a warning that they shouldn't be used in the same house as any birds... well... it won't be used by me, either.

Out of curiosity, why are these bulbs teflon coated? Do people have problems with crud getting stuck on bulbs?
 
Kristaps Vinogulajs
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Interesting article, actually i have not payed attention to such a thing. Googled something.
Chad Hadsell wrote:
Out of curiosity, why are these bulbs teflon coated? Do people have problems with crud getting stuck on bulbs?


Teflon coating makes bulbs shatter resistant.

But be aware - not only incandescent bulbs can be coated with teflon but almost any kind of bulbs(including fluorescent) can be coated (i could not find a word on LED bulbs).
I do not know why they are manufacturing such a poison..
it is all about the damn $, is not it?
 
Valerie Dawnstar
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Now that we know, how can we responsibly get these teflon products out of our homes? Where is away?
 
Yone' Ward
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Kristaps Vinogulajs wrote:
But be aware - not only incandescent bulbs can be coated with teflon but almost any kind of bulbs(including fluorescent) can be coated (i could not find a word on LED bulbs).
I do not know why they are manufacturing such a poison..
it is all about the damn $, is not it?

LEDs stay cold, relatively speaking, so it probably isn't a problem.
 
Daniel Morse
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I have eliminated all Teflon from my home. It stinks, dogs don't like the smell and it is deadly to birds. I never liked the taste of food fried in it. IF i have to use a pan with it I boil a lot of water and let it soak the poison out. Of course this just reduces, not get rid of it.

More examples of larg corps using us all as test subjects. Now I challenge everyone to tell and vote.
 
Joe Braxton
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FYI - The rough service bulbs are made for use in vibrating machinery. They are shatter resistant and have a filament that is more forgiving of shock. We use them at work in machine tools. Standard incandescent, led, or any florescent bulb just will not stand it for more than a few hours. I can't see why anyone would need or use these at home.....
 
Yone' Ward
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Location: Springdale, WA USA - Cold Mediterranean Climate
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Joe Braxton wrote:FYI - The rough service bulbs are made for use in vibrating machinery. They are shatter resistant and have a filament that is more forgiving of shock. We use them at work in machine tools. Standard incandescent, led, or any florescent bulb just will not stand it for more than a few hours. I can't see why anyone would need or use these at home.....

We crawl under cars with a trouble light with an incandescent bulb in it and it bumps around as we crawl around under the car as water drips on us. The uncontrolled nature of our usage of the trouble light and the environment we are working in makes durability just a smart thing. No one wants to spend a minute crawling under a car in the mud and ice, cursing the car for requiring such from me, just to have the ^$##@%*&*&%#$%^ light bulb die on us. Given the nature of the environment, I personally am willing to consider other technologies than incandescent.
 
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