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Uses for feed bags

 
master gardener
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Now that I have significantly reduced my garbage, I have discovered my biggest source is feed bags.   I am talking about the paper ones with the plastic like coating.   What uses do they have besides mulch?
 
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Our local feed company switched from all paper feed bags to plastic coated ones and the uproar was sufficient to get them to switch back. Using plastic lined bags for anything but garbage seems like a bad idea to me - too much micro-plastic to deal which I'm already trying to reduce on my land.

I will not suggest you starve your animals, but maybe you can come up with some permie alternatives to the amount of feed they're getting? Yes, chicken pellets are easy, but consider if there are other, less processed options that might come in different packaging or a different brand?
 
John F Dean
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Hi Jay,

I have commented before about having a large farmer as a neighbor.  I have been careful regarding how many times I go to the well out of fear of becoming a pain in the backside.   I am considering trying to buy directly from him.  

What makes this interesting is that in the past he has been extremely considerate.   This leads me to believe that he might attempt some organic crops to develop direct sales to an alternative market.

Still, I am interested in alternative uses for feed bags.
 
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I use them to collect recycling on my walks.
 
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I use them as trash bags. Our landfill accepts them in place of purchased plastic trash bags, so that's one more item I don't have to buy.
 
Leigh Tate
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I just remembered this! Instructables has a tutorial for using them to make a Feed Bag Tote Bag.



(Except, this isn't the kind you're talking about.)
 
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Feed bags here are pretty thin plastic no use for anything other than bin liners and since they invariably have holes in.. not much use for that! Since ours are plan clear plastic they can go in the recycling along with the hundreds of wood pellet bags we generate each year.
 
Jay Angler
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Skandi Rogers wrote: Since ours are plain clear plastic they can go in the recycling along with the hundreds of wood pellet bags we generate each year.

Yes, plain plastic or plain paper are easier to recycle than the mix of the two. When some of the mixed ones landed in my compost accidentally, I had to try to gently pull it out without the ultra-thin plastic breaking up too much. I wonder if the worms would selectively eat the paper off the mixed style of bag? I was using a regular compost, rather than a worm-specific one.

and wrote:

since they invariably have holes in.. not much use for that!

I used to get rabbit pee/poop contaminated bedding from a lady who was struggling to keep it out of the land-fill. The thin garbage bags she used didn't survive well, but I found if I doubled them so that the holes didn't line up, that enabled me to get a second use out of most of them.
 
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I'm thinking of using mine as earth bags to build a shed.  As long as they aren't exposed to UV, I think they would work well, so I would want to save up enough of them for the walls, and then build the walls and cover them in as short a time as possible.  They are pretty tough.  I use them to hold charcoal that I crush by running over and over it with my pickup and they can withstand that, they should be able to withstand a one-time tamping on a wall.
 
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