• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • jordan barton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Steve Thorn
  • Leigh Tate
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Greg Martin
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Nancy Reading

Pulverizing roots

 
Posts: 11
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne, England
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi,
I'm working with herbs and got some shredded marshmallow roots, thinking I'd pulverize them as I needed them, so they'd be fresh.  Using a medium size pestle and mortar, I made a batch up, it took at least a couple of hours to get a mere 4 tablespoons reasonably fine.  A lot of work for a small amount of powder, and I have the rest of a kilo of shredded roots left to use up #-)

I see there are electric grinders, but aesthetically I'm looking for something lower tech' if possible.  I've looked for grindstones, all I've found so far under this are blade sharpeners.

Any thoughts or advice?

Antony
 
pollinator
Posts: 509
Location: New Jersey, USA
206
kids home care dog books cooking food preservation bike writing woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What are you using the roots for? I’m wondering if there’s an easier route to your intended goal - salves, balms, infusions, decoction? Then you could gust use a sharp knife and chop into thin disks? Two hours with a pestle and mortar must have been an exhausting workout. Maybe you just need a much bigger pestle and mortar - I have a 20kg one that can pulp almost anything in five minutes.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3404
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7 AHS:4 GDD:3000 Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
417
2
forest garden solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How would you power your grind stone?
 
master steward
Posts: 6131
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1820
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I used my Oster blender to grate my chicory which produced something like coffee.

Why not use a blender then use the pestle and mortar to finish it into a powder?
 
Antony Brush
Posts: 11
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne, England
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

S Bengi wrote:How would you power your grind stone?


With elbow grease :-D
I haven't really worked it out.
Cheers
 
Antony Brush
Posts: 11
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne, England
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Edward Norton wrote:What are you using the roots for? I’m wondering if there’s an easier route to your intended goal - salves, balms, infusions, decoction? Then you could gust use a sharp knife and chop into thin disks? Two hours with a pestle and mortar must have been an exhausting workout. Maybe you just need a much bigger pestle and mortar - I have a 20kg one that can pulp almost anything in five minutes.



Thanks for that!  It's part of a powder to soak and then drink, to soothe and detoxify the gut.  I tried a coarse grind with the previous batch, but it just didn't work well - I ended up pulling out any lump that was too big.  A fine powder is just much nicer to drink & I assume more effective.  I don't know exactly how long it took, but I did get a blister out of it #-)

Thanks for the tip on the 20kg pestle and mortar!  I will be looking for one.
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 6131
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1820
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Since you are using it as something to drink, why not use the cut root to make a strong tea? Then strain.
 
Antony Brush
Posts: 11
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne, England
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Anne Miller wrote:Since you are using it as something to drink, why not use the cut root to make a strong tea? Then strain.


Thanks.  For this mix, everything else is powder, so I need the root to be powdered too.

Cool idea though, could work in other combos.  I will give it a try.  Thanks!
 
pollinator
Posts: 636
Location: South-central Wisconsin
237
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I use a coffee grinder to grind up herbs. The flow-through kind, not the whirling blades kind.

If there's an herb I use frequently, I may dedicate a grinder just for that, so I don't have to be as finicky when cleaning it between uses.

Grinders tend to be cheap at thrift stores, or sometimes Amazon has a good deal on them.
 
Ruth Stout was famous for gardening naked. Just like this tiny ad:
The Wheaton Eco Scale
https://permies.com/t/scale
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic