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How far do bees travel?

 
Posts: 75
Location: Arizona low desert
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I've lived on my land since March 2010 and this year I finally saw good old fashioned bees. The poppies started blooming profusely in July and one day I saw a few bees enjoying them. Within 3 days bees were everywhere! I was thrilled

I have newly sprouted buckwheat for them, that will hopefully provide for several more months. I also planted lemon mint and am still waiting for those to sprout. I hope to keep enough blooms around to make the bees want to visit regularly.

I'm curious where they come from though. Do they travel far for nectar/pollen sources? If I keep them happy will they nest nearby?

Our nearest neighbor is it least a quarter mile away and this is a desert scrub area other than the slow progresses I've made.
 
pollinator
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Location: zone 7
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In general a few miles from the hive. Chances are someones keeping bees or there is a wild hive. I bet someones keeping bees.
 
Kathy Burns-Millyard
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Thanks Jordan. There are small neighborhoods a couple of miles away so maybe they live in there. Hopefully they'll make my place a regular stop
 
steward
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I believe four miles from the hive is common, and six miles isn't out of the question if the forage is sparse closer to home.
 
Kathy Burns-Millyard
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Wow it never occurred to me that they might travel so far. Guess I was kind of hoping a wild hive had taken up residence nearby
 
tel jetson
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Kathy Burns-Millyard wrote:Wow it never occurred to me that they might travel so far. Guess I was kind of hoping a wild hive had taken up residence nearby



doesn't mean there isn't a colony near by. it does mean that you could have luck attracting a swarm if you put up one or more bait hives.
 
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My brother in law keeps bees and is learning me how to. He told me that bees fly up to 3 kilometres from their hive.

However because of the pollution and insecticides used by farmers here in Europe where I live, they get disorientated and go only up to 1.5 km. Most of the times they can't find their nest back.... It's a big problem here, the bees are ex-stinting...
 
Posts: 210
Location: Manitowoc WI USA Zone 5
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I have read two miles is common and three miles is rare. I'll have to cinch up a saddle on one of them honeys and find out!
 
tel jetson
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Rick Larson wrote:I have read two miles is common and three miles is rare. I'll have to cinch up a saddle on one of them honeys and find out!



are you familiar with the practice of beelining? no need for a saddle; a bit of thread and some stamina will do.
 
                    
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Location: AR ~ozark mountain range~zone7a
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Don't know how far, I haven't seen a honey bee in 2 or more years.

james beam
 
Rick Larson
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tel jetson wrote:

Rick Larson wrote:I have read two miles is common and three miles is rare. I'll have to cinch up a saddle on one of them honeys and find out!



are you familiar with the practice of beelining? no need for a saddle; a bit of thread and some stamina will do.



I don't know about that. I'm fat and getting pretty darn old.. However, I can envision this!
 
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