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Herbs for Burns

 
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https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/11/herbs-for-burns.html

From Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture People:



We will see several herbs discussed already in this and the next two sections, Rashes, Bites and Stings.  Chief among these are Arnica, Saint John's Wort and Swedish Bitters.  All may be used externally as washes, poultices and salves, just as they are used for wounds and bruises.

Aloe, Prickly Pear Cactus, Houseleek (Sempervivum tectorum) and Purslane (Portulaca) are all useful similarly because they are succulents.  They all have a gel within their leaves or pads that is soothing, mildly astringent, antibacterial and healing. Houseleek, by the way, is the European name for the ornamental succulent usually called Hens and Chicks in America.

Butterbur (Petasites) is a very good herb for burns.  The leaves are large and are soothing applied to burns and wounds.

Fr. Künzle said of Butterbur:

Even more valuable are the large leaves of Butterbur (Petasites hybridus) they are gray below, green above, huge, in the Alps they look like an umbrella; inwardly they are excellent against  coughs; they should be dried long and carefully in the sun.  Outwardly, the large leaves are invaluable against any kind of burns, tired feet, infected wounds and swellings, when crushed and applied. The dried leaves are softened in the water. In case of severe sprains and dislocations, apply a handful immediately. How many herbs God has sown! Glory and thanks to him!



Lily Of The Valley (Convallaria majalis) An ointment of the root has been used traditionally for burns.  This plant, however, has digitalis-like properties and should be used with caution internally or on broken skin/open wounds.

Downy Rattlesnake Plantain (Goodyera pubescens) may be used externally for burns as a leaf poultice.

Wild Mustard (Brassica rapa) seeds have been used as a poultice for burns... mustard seeds usually have a hot, irritating quality, so that probably would not be my first choice.

Indian Strawberry (Duchesnea indica) leaves are astringent and may be used as a wash or poultice for burns.

Clammy Ground Cherry (Physalis heterophylla) A tea of the leaves and roots may be used as a wash for burns.

Gumweed (Grindelia squarrosa) is an excellent herb for burns and wounds.  A leaf poultice is generally used.

Canada Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis) Root is useful for burns as a wash.

Jewelweed or Touch Me Not (Impatiens capensis) is a great herb for burns and rashes.  The stems contain a lot of moisture that is somewhat gel-like, and similar to aloe.  It can be applied as a fresh plant tincture, or the juice pressed out and frozen for first aid use.

Fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium) is a weedy herb that usually appears after a forest fire.  Native Americans used the peeled root for burns, sores, boils, etc.  They also used the root of Heartleaved Four O'Clock (Mirabilis nyctainea) similarly.

Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) flower tea is a useful wash for burns.

Salad Burnet (Sanguisorba officinalis) is one we have discussed before, but it is especially good for burns.  The powdered root has been used clinically for 2nd and 3rd degree burns.

Burdock (Arctium) The leaves of burdock are large and are very useful as a poultice for burns.  Burdock is soothing and healing, much like Plantain.

Flax (Linum usitatissimum) seeds may be used as a poultice for burns... probably much preferable to mustard seed.

Echinacea, all varieties.  The root, used as a tea/wash soothes and helps burns heal.

Lamb Quarters ( Chenopodium album) Leaf poultice is useful for burns.

Labrador Tea (Ledum Groenlandicum) Leaves may be used as a wash for burns,

Wild Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens) Scraped bark may be used as a poultice for burns and wounds.

Tamarack or Larch (Larix laricina) Bark tea is good for burns, sores and most skin ailments.

Tuliptree (lirodendron tulipifera) Bark tea is useful as a wash for burns, sores and boils.

Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra) Inner bark tea is astringent and useful as a wash for burns.

American Beech (Fagus grandiflora) Leaf tea is a good wash for burns and frostbite.

American Bittersweet (Celastrus scandens) Bark may be used as an ointment for burns.

Bracken Fern (Pteridium aqualinum) Poulticed root is good for burns and sores.

Common Cattail (Typha latifolia) Native Americans pounded the root into a jelly-like consistency and used is as a poultice for burns and wounds.

Other herbs we have discussed for wounds that are also good for burns include: Pearly Everlasting, Clintonia, Agrimony, Stoneroot, Balsam Fir and Slippery Elm.

Another herb we have discussed is Lady's Mantle.  Fr. Künzle recommended it for burns:

The lady's mantle, well boiled and drunk warm, relieves headache, heals cold in the head, eye infections, and often headaches, toothaches (gargle your mouth!) It also heals fever, burns, suppuration and ulcers, which is why it cannot be more than enough recommended to women. Every woman after giving birth should diligently drink quite a lot of this herb for 8 to 10 days. Some children would still have their mother and many a beaten widower his wife if they had known this gift of God.

Furthermore, the herb, boiled and drunk a lot, takes fever and burns in case of broken ribs, knocks from wood, stone, iron, after severe falls. A great many people die from internal injuries; this herb quickly removes fever and burn, and speeds healing; but in this case drink a lot, 1 to 2 liter a day, depending on thirst. (Add sugar!)

Externally applied and crushed, lady’s mantle heals wounds, stabs, cuts.

Fr. Kneipp tells us:

Sauerkraut (pickled cabbage) is a good house-remedy for slighter burns. It must be fresh from the tub and is bandaged round the injured part. Also the water produced from Sauerkraut by pressure, may be employed in a similar manner. Some prefer scraped potatoes, others linseed-oil. All these little remedies are good.

A cook had the misfortune of scalding her hand and her arm up to the elbow with boiling water. Medical aid was immediately on the spot, but in spite of the most careful treatment, the wound did not heal for weeks. Now the person had recourse to the remedies prescribed by me which alleviated her pain almost instantaneously and eventually effected her complete cure.

The applications were: 1) The whole wound was painted with white of egg and oil and bandaged with a wet cloth ; for the first few days the bandage was renewed twice daily. 2) Injurious juices and dirt were extracted by a bandage of infused hay-flowers. During the cure, several ulcers formed. To heal these, a decoction of Foenum graecum (or fenugreek) was applied. By means of these remedies which were alternately made use of, hand and arm were completely cured.


The above article is an excerpt from my new book Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture People




You can read about and purchase Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture People here: southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.html

Also available on Amazon: Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture People: Carroll, Judson: 9798491252923: Amazon.com: Books





Disclaimer


The information on this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or condition. Nothing on this site has been evaluated or approved by the FDA. I am not a doctor. The US government does not recognize the practice of herbal medicine and their is no governing body regulating herbalists. Therefore, I'm just a guy who studies herbs. I am not offering any advice. I won't even claim that anything I write is accurate or true! I can tell you what herbs have "traditionally been used for." I can tell you my own experience and if I believe an herb helped me. I cannot, nor would I tell you to do the same. If you use any herb I, or anyone else, mentions you are treating yourself. You take full responsibility for your health. Humans are individuals and no two are identical. What works for me may not work for you. You may have an allergy, sensitivity or underlying condition that no one else shares and you don't even know about. Be careful with your health. By continuing to read my blog you agree to be responsible for yourself, do your own research, make your own choices and not to blame me for anything, ever.
 
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Most of those I've never tried before. My favorite burn remedy is a mix of comfrey and aloe. Aloe stops the damage, while comfrey speeds up the production of replacement skin. I've seen it heal burns faster than I thought possible.

Unfortunately, they don't preserve well. Heat destroys the active compounds, and mixing in enough preservatives to make them shelf-stable means that your finished product doesn't have much of the herb left. Freezing works, but isn't always convenient. Still looking for a better way.
 
Judson Carroll
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Ellendra Nauriel wrote:Most of those I've never tried before. My favorite burn remedy is a mix of comfrey and aloe. Aloe stops the damage, while comfrey speeds up the production of replacement skin. I've seen it heal burns faster than I thought possible.

Unfortunately, they don't preserve well. Heat destroys the active compounds, and mixing in enough preservatives to make them shelf-stable means that your finished product doesn't have much of the herb left. Freezing works, but isn't always convenient. Still looking for a better way.



Good combo!
 
a wee bit from the empire
Ernie and Erica Wisner's Rocket Mass Heater Everything Combo
https://permies.com/t/40993/Ernie-Erica-Wisner-Rocket-Mass
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