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persimmon marinade for jerky?

 
Kelson Water
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the only kind of jerky i have made is "turkey jerky." i'm thinking about drying some beef or venison this fall. i have harvested persimmons before, and wonder if they would make a good marinade

for meat, since persimmons contain alot of tannins, anyone have thoughts or experience about drying meat and or using persimmons in the process?

 
Jordan Lowery
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Are we talking ripe persimmons or still astringent?

I really like persimmon with pork for Christmas. The pig is slaughtered because it's the end of the year and he/she is huge, its cold out and I'm hankering for some fatty pastured deliciousness. It just so happens that at that time the persimmons start getting at their best, like natures pre made jelly. Also the chestnuts have finished not too much earlier and the three make a great combo.

 
Kelson Water
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yum, chestnuts!!! yjm yum yum!! sweet chestnut butter and pears make a great tart!! i dried some persimmon pulp in a 150 degree oven on a pizza stone for 8 hours. the result was leathery and not as sweet as the persimmon pulp i started with. it seemed like the tannins changed in the drying process, becoming more noticable. just wondering if persimmons would cure the meat in a different way, maybe allowing a shorter drying time or adding to the shelf life.
 
Kelson Water
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we're talking ripe persimmons, btw, though the unripe ones are way more astringent, so here's another question, has anyone used astringent persimmons to cure anything else? or to clean with?
 
Kelson Water
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and ps., i will try the combo of persimmons and chestnuts if i can find them this year. maybe a chestnut flour persimmon tart.
 
Jordan Lowery
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We pick our persimmons just when orange and still astringent, we make hoshi gaki with them, Japanese dried persimmon. The jelly like ripe fruit is used in marinates, sweet breads, sauces and such I can't see that stuff dry being anything but like leather.

Don't forget persimmons and pork, excellent stuff. And turkey.
 
Cris Bessette
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I think persimmons is one of the main ingredients of American indian pemmican.

 
Kelson Water
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that sounds good. i never made pecammin myself. who has pecammin recipies?
 
Joe Braxton
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"The Pemmican Manual"

http://www.traditionaltx.us/images/PEMMICAN.pdf

I've not made it yet, so YMMV.
 
Kelson Water
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more specificly, i'm talking about the smaller persimmons, they are less watery than the bigger ones, though i like the bigger ones too, though. i think the small persimmons would make a good addition to pecammin, i wonder if it was an ingrediant in pecammin that the europeans knew nothing about. thank you everyone for the recipie and responses. i think i will fiddle around with the recipie/ see how oil and persimmons interact/ / maybe adding a saponifying herb, if i can find one that is local and editable/ not trying to sound nerdy, thankful that there are people who like talking about this.
 
Cris Bessette
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Kelson McCoy wrote: more specificly, i'm talking about the smaller persimmons, they are less watery than the bigger ones, though i like the bigger ones too, though. i think the small persimmons would make a good addition to pecammin, i wonder if it was an ingrediant in pecammin that the europeans knew nothing about. thank you everyone for the recipie and responses. i think i will fiddle around with the recipie/ see how oil and persimmons interact/ / maybe adding a saponifying herb, if i can find one that is local and editable/ not trying to sound nerdy, thankful that there are people who like talking about this.


I have a large American persimmon tree in my front yard (Diospyros Virginiana) I guess this is what you mean by "small ones" as they are smaller than a golf ball.

It is typically covered with fruit every year and I am starting to tire of persimmon freezer jam so I am looking for other ways to use these. I tried making wine last year but I screwed it up somehow.
 
Judith Browning
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Our american persimmons vary in size up to the size of a golf ball and all ripen to a date or jam like consistancy. I am realizing there is even greater variation than I thought...what a wonderful fruit. I'll be watching this thread for recipes!
 
Kelson Water
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yes, sounds good.
 
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