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Acupuncture for your critters

 
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I was watching a youtube video by Justin Rhodes from Abundance plus and he was showcasing a woman who was told she had only a few years to live, after having two open-heart surgeries. She bought a farm in 2010 and is still "alive and kicking".

Here is the link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-kRi4r1rpM&list=LL&index=1

It's about 43 minutes.

This video reminded me of an old dormant desire to learn about Acupuncture. And now that I am close to some of my other goals of having land and building a homestead through Permaculture methods, and also researching my new goal of becoming a Beaver Ambassador for BC and other parts of Canada, I have been thinking that acupuncture would be wonderful to use on my livestock animals such as goats, pigs, sheep, cattle, dogs, and probably even ducks, chickens, geese. And my people would benefit too.

Does anyone have any experience with using Acupuncture with animals? I have been on the receiving end of acupuncture, a few times, and I certainly believe in the benefits of it. I've heard of people using acupuncture on their dogs and cats. I think it would be wonderful to use with livestock as well.

Unfortunately or maybe it is fortunately ---- a 3 year Acupuncture program is offered in Nelson, BC - very near where we will be buying property. The program is about 20 hours per week of instruction and probably a ton of homework and that's ok. The cost is between 10k and 14k per year for tuition, so it's a hefty fee that I really have to consider where the money is coming from. There's probably a few thousand for books, and plus travel costs to Nelson 5 days a week. The school has more clinical time than other schools who offer the same program in BC (according to their website), which sounds excellent. Maybe I could get a student loan.

IF I do this, this will limit my available hours and energy to work my land. It will completely take up time I would have spent learning a PDC and a Master Gardening course.

Just in the flow of writing this, I now see it differently: I think Acupuncture is a good goal, which can wait until I have my PDC and Master Gardening course done, wait until I have set up many many Beaver solutions in BC and other Western provinces, wait until my homestead is past the development stage and in the maintenance stage.

Whew. Thanks for reading, if you got this far.

Happy Gardening :)

 
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I often find that writing out the problem makes it easier to see. Whether that's in an email to a friend, or just typing it all out. It sounds like a good plan, and acupuncture will always be there!
 
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Back in the late 1970s I had a cat that was hit by a car.  I took him to a vet clinic, and they brought him back to health .....except his hind legs  did not work.  One day one of the vets from the clinic said he had just been through acupuncture training and wanted to try it.  Of course, we thought it worth the effort.  The cat was walking within a week or so.
 
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My 2 cents is that if you plan to start a business in acupuncture or use it for income, then go for it!! It would be a great way to earn money to pay for your homestead.
If you are just doing it for a hobby, that is a steep price to pay.
If you get good livestock and keep them on either fresh grass or deep bedding, then you will have very minimal health issues and wouldn't need acupuncture, and if you did need it on occasion then it would be a lot cheaper to pay an acupuncturist to come in and provide treatment than to do it yourself.
Just a couple thoughts
 
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Thanks for sharing your process with us! Acupuncture is definitely quite powerful and fascinating. I wonder if a good way to continue exploring the interest and get some of the benefit for your critters and people in the meantime would be self-study of acupressure? Kind of as a stepping stone to acupuncture when you have the time.
Acupressure is a great self-treatment option and could help you start learning the meridians. Even knowing just a few points can be quite helpful for addressing health issues.
 
Lana Berticevich
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Heather Sharpe wrote:Thanks for sharing your process with us! Acupuncture is definitely quite powerful and fascinating. I wonder if a good way to continue exploring the interest and get some of the benefit for your critters and people in the meantime would be self-study of acupressure? Kind of as a stepping stone to acupuncture when you have the time.
Acupressure is a great self-treatment option and could help you start learning the meridians. Even knowing just a few points can be quite helpful for addressing health issues.



This is interesting - I recently received a book my father owned (he died in 2001), and it is called "Touch for Health" which is about acupressure. I have it stored away in a box of other things my stepmother gave me and haven't given it more than a glance. I think that box, and a couple others of my dad's stuff is at my partner's house, as I didn't have room for them. Very good idea! There is probably a lot of very good information in that book. He took a Touch for Health course with his wife when he had a lot of pain from a back injury that wouldn't heal because it was related to his cancer. I know that acupressure helped ease his pains in the last few years of his life.
 
Lana Berticevich
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Tereza Okava wrote:I often find that writing out the problem makes it easier to see. Whether that's in an email to a friend, or just typing it all out. It sounds like a good plan, and acupuncture will always be there!



I think this is actually better than talking about it. The process of writing it out allows us to review it as many times as we want before we hit "send" or "submit". A conversation never allows for that. Then again, talking about it with someone can also be illuminating - another person's viewpoint can help further the process too. However more times than not, talking to someone results in a lot of "you can't do that" type of talk.  


 
Lana Berticevich
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John F Dean wrote:Back in the late 1970s I had a cat that was hit by a car.  I took him to a vet clinic, and they brought him back to health .....except his hind legs  did not work.  One day one of the vets from the clinic said he had just been through acupuncture training and wanted to try it.  Of course, we thought it worth the effort.  The cat was walking within a week or so.



That is awesome! I too, have heard of successes like that with pets. Thanks for sharing!
 
Lana Berticevich
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Jt Glickman wrote:My 2 cents is that if you plan to start a business in acupuncture or use it for income, then go for it!! It would be a great way to earn money to pay for your homestead.
If you are just doing it for a hobby, that is a steep price to pay.
If you get good livestock and keep them on either fresh grass or deep bedding, then you will have very minimal health issues and wouldn't need acupuncture, and if you did need it on occasion then it would be a lot cheaper to pay an acupuncturist to come in and provide treatment than to do it yourself.
Just a couple thoughts



It is something else to consider - using acupuncture to help pay for my homestead.

I am planning to keep the livestock on deep bedding. Good, healthy livestock to start with too.
 
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