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Tilia cordata

 
John Saltveit
gardener
Posts: 2001
61
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi trees
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Hello Eric,
I loved perennial vegetables. I read it and went out and bought a tilia cordata, which apparently English people call lime trees. Are they aware that there already is a plant called a lime tree?

Anyway, it grew very slowly the first year and is now coming along. I have read how someone described the flavor as horrible. I disagree. I thought it was quite fibrous, but the flavor was fine. Typically, I cut them finely (chiffonade sp?) and could see mixing them in soups, casseroles, etc. I am curious as to how you eat them. Could you explain how you would prepare them for eating? I live near Portland, so it is currently very dry. We haven't had rain for two months which is typical for this time of year. DOes amount of water affect the quality of the leaves for eating?
THanks<
JOhn S
PDX OR
 
Eric Toensmeier
Author
Posts: 145
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Hi John, Martin Crawford is really the master of linden eating. I have eaten them raw and tender in spring for many years, and finally planted some this year. We will coppice them annually, as the young tender growth lasts almost all season on coppice resprouts. Martin likes them as a base for salads in stead of lettuce. This works for me as many other forest garden salads are very strongly flavored.
 
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