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Leads on Homesteading communities?

 
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Hello beautiful people

We are looking for any information you may have on homesteading communities in your area. We want land to homestead but have no idea where to look or how find like-minded people. We moved from SATX to Ohio this year but have no intention to stay in Ohio. We come from a city so we don’t have any idea of places near to San Antonio either.

We’re open to moving almost anywhere except the more extreme cold zones (higher than 7)

I don’t tend to get too many responses on my posts here for some reason, but any  help would be appreciated.
 
steward
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My community is probably out then :(   But for those who can handle a bit of snow, there are lots of homesteaders in my area (north north central WI)
 
master steward
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I asked Mr. Google how to find Homesteading Communities, Here are some of the responses I got:

When looking at communities check out the local 4-H Club.

Check out the local Feed Stores or Farmer's Supply.

Attend Auctions.

Join a Homestead Forum.

Go to the Library to Find
Homesteading Communities

Librarians tend to have a great wealth of information anyway, but the librarian of a small rural town might help you find and create communities passionate about homesteading by giving you names of those who own goats or cows, make and sell cheese and sell hay and vegetables in the summertime.



I know this doesn't answer your question but maybe you will get some ideas here that will help.

When we were looking for a community to start our homestead we wanted to stay close to our jobs so it made choosing a location easy.





 
Heather Reaches
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Yes, I think I can do some snow like we have here but deep down, I think we’re southerners at heart. The 40s are okay. But anything past 35 and momma bear is cranky haha.

Yes Anna I think we read the same article! Haha. There are pros and cons to being open minded. Or rather maybe just indecisive haha

Thank both of y’all for your time
 
pollinator
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I would check out Foundation for Intentional Communities. There are lots of leads there.

Other than that, it seems like more people post on permies about wanting people to join them than vice versa, so maybe just read and respond to those posts as opposed to waiting for someone to respond to yours.

I guess it depends on whether you are looking for a formal arrangement or something casual. I would suggest FIC for formal arrangements and permies for mostly casual arrangements.

Best of luck.

 
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Can a farmer take a holiday in the summer one year and go to Europe/wherever for a month?  Yes, if they are a member of a cohousing Farming Community.  Does each neighbor in a neighborhood need a tractor or lawn mover or chainsaw or pickup truck?  Not if they are a member of a common-purpose cohousing community.  How long will it take you to build a shed for chickens?  Not long if members of your community do it together.  Is it easy to trade places with someone else in the world for a month and experience a different culture and country?  Pretty easy if both families are members of a co-housing community and can swap homes and work for a different look at life for an agreed upon period of a week or two, a month, even six months.  What do you do with your dog, cat and canary, not to mention chickens and rabbits, if you have to suddenly attend a family event far away?  They can stay with and be cared for by your neighbors if you live in a cohousing community (and you will be able to do that for your neighbors when they need it as well).

I am on the Planning Board in my small town and we are trying to rezone so that a "cluster housing" option is available for plots of more than 10 acres so a group of homeowners can have a main house, some small personal homes clustered in one place and reserve the rest of the land for permaculture or group farming, with the addition of a couple businesses perhaps like a woodshop, seminar spaces, pottery, food products such as jam, honey and candles, chutney, goat milk and cheese, eggs, baked goods or jerkey, and a café/shop or WHATEVER the group chooses to create.  This would be similar to owning a condo where one owns the interior of one's own space and then is a member of the association that owns all the land (or you could arrange it as a co-op where members own shares of all of it determined by the square feet of their living space).  There are charter rules and if someone wants to sell, the association has to approve the new buyer as part of the sales process.  The small homes or tiny houses would not need entertaining space, laundries, or much of a kitchen as that would be shared at the main house and in the ones I've visited when I lived in Washington State, the members would eat dinner together about 4 times per week with members rotating on the cooking team.  The kids would be kind of like a tribe and the members might form small groups or pairs for support and activity purposes.  There might be a music room/library for get togethers and communal relaxing time and meetings.  Some of these have a bunkhouse for visitors who come to work for a while and stay.  That could also be housing if the community offers seminars or seminar space.  Members (by agreement with community) can choose to do work hours, or work in town/from home and contribute financially, or a mixture.  Elders, youngsters, etc. can be valued parts of the multigenerational community.  If there's one artist, they can contribute art workshops for the community, etc.  My question is, does anyone have this going on or know of good examples so I can present some examples to my Planning Board members so we can get the idea?    Around Seattle the land cost is higher, but there are plenty of places where it's lower, so it could work for all kinds of starter investments, but that has to be thought of when choosing the place to do it... also the zoning laws, whether they permit cluster housing or not... currently our town voted it down about 15 years ago but I am not sure why (yes, next step is to find out).  Here is a random one in Washington State, where 10 years ago they had 17 cohousing communities (I only visited 2). https://www.sunnysidevillagecohousing.com/?gclid=CjwKCAiAwKyNBhBfEiwA_mrUMk-gZSOTjbIcqQSGYnPFMW43WBBIiNpEB-bI4MVb0AkoOjVprx6hxhoCQIUQAvD_BwE
 
pollinator
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I have to assume there are such organizations/groups out there.

I have noticed, on Permies, there are regional areas such as PNW for Pacific Northwest.  Perhaps you could ask this in one or more of the forums specific to your desired geographical area?

I would be tempted to research climate/areas that you would desire, then pair that with available land suitable for a Permie (not near nasty current or historical industrial or other ick factor places) looking to grow food and raise livestock and land cost.  Once you have a budget and have defined the areas, you could more directly seek communities that would be centered on what you are seeking.

I kinda of feel that by nature, Permies are not groupers, or joiners and have a tendency to be outliers...not to say never congregate - the Lab is a perfect example - but co-ops or clusters seem to be a rare set up.

I suspect Google and the like are your best friends at this juncture.  Hoping someone else has some actual links that will help out.
 
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