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Has anybody successfully raised dragonflies for mosquito control?

 
Klaymen Strife
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Any tips or pointers?
 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
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I didn't look up the exact numbers but I believe that dragon flies spend aprox 1-2 years in underwater and that is when they are eating mosquitoes. Then when we see them as adult dragon flies they are in thier last few months of life.

For that reason I do not ever completely clean out my water features. One is 40 gallons the other about 400 gallons. I just over flow them occasionally and after the last leaf drop I scoop out leaves making sure to leave quite a fair number of old leaves and debris. This is where the dragonfly larvae and frog/toad eggs are hanging out.

We now have loads of dragonflies and this year there were somewhere over 1000 tadpoles divided into about 3 different hatches.

I have to admit - we still have killer mostquitoes here though. I walked outside to let out the chickens and pick greens and had probably 10 bites in less then 10 minutes. I be in long pants and long sleeve shirt before I go out again shortly.
 
Victor Johanson
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Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
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Jeanine Gurley wrote:I didn't look up the exact numbers but I believe that dragon flies spend aprox 1-2 years in underwater and that is when they are eating mosquitoes.


Adult dragonflies are known in some parts as mosquito hawks, and are voracious predators of flying mosquitoes. I have had several of them flying around me outside, providing a zone of protection and even plucking some mosquitoes right off my skin. The crunching sound I heard was quite satisfying. Hornets are also big mosquito eaters.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Apparently it's best to avoid putting fish in the dragonfly pond, because the young dragonflies are likely to be eaten.

 
Shawn Harper
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But fish also eat skeeters...
 
Tyler Ludens
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Yep, it's a conundrum....
 
John Kang
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Well not sure if this topic is still relevant.
But yes, there was a large successful case of dragonfly breeding to reduce mosquito population, hundreds of years ago and still now.
Dragonflies in Korea prey on mosquitoes their entire life, dragonfly larvae on mosquito larvae, and the fully grown dragonflies still prey on the mosquitoes.
kyong-ju is known as a city of water, for there are numerous artificial ponds, water ways, streams and so on. Korean scholars seonbe-it also means gentleman "person with modesty, wisdom"- used to use these water ways as places of entertainments, and built outdoor tea drink places etc.
The only problem was that with such large amount of water bodies, it meant it was also crawling with mosquitoes. There were many attempts to artificially eliminate mosquitoes, but all failed. Later, they have discovered a larger more voracious specie of dragonflies- one with red tail, they used to call it "pepper-fly" Gochu-jam-ja-ri, that was particularly good at preying on mosquitoes. As a result, these dragonflies were transported to Kyong-ju and everything worked out as hoped.

There are a lot of dragonflies flying around in Kyongju, especially now in summer, I used to go around with my net catching them. Now I kinda feel bad about that having my sleeps interrupted by these damn blood suckers.
 
Victor Johanson
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Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
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Here in Fairbanks we have had an unbelievably severe mosquito infestation this year. I went to a friend's place back in the bush a few weeks ago, and there were literally thousands of dragonflies cruising around. Didn't get bit even once up there.
 
Adam Klaus
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I notice that the dragonflies really like vegetation that is sticking up out of the water. Lily pads, rushes, etc. We've had tons on the pond this year, since there is more vegetation than before.
Beautiful little creatures.
 
Jordan Lowery
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Around here we have the adult dragonflies come out early morning before it's too hot, and late afternoon. On the three acres of farm we have around 500 dragonflies eating flying insects ( a lot of which are mosquitoes.) they go until the sun sets then the bats take over. In mid day it's too hot for Mosquitos to be out and bothering you.

The good thing is the dragonflies eat massive amounts of "pest" insects. Though there not pests to me really.
 
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