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Beans in bread

 
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What beans can be used in making a loaf of bread and which ones are the best.
 
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There's some traditional flatbreads made from chickpeas, but I don't know how that would translate to a loaf. I've used a little bit of lentil flour in loaf bread before, but it was still mostly wheat flour.
 
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I like to experiment so I would probably add 1 cup of mashed beans in place of 1 cup of flour to a bread recipe.

Here are a couple of threads about using beans in bread:

https://permies.com/t/39374/kitchen/Kidney-Bean-Sourdough

https://permies.com/t/171816/kitchen/Garbanzo-Flour
 
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Cornell bread is a fortified bread with extra protein and calcium that uses soy flour/meal. It stands to reason that any legume flour/meal could replace soy for those who don't like it.

I've also seen variations with this same recipe but made without yeast as a flatbread on the stove.

My favorite bread with beans uses sweet red bean paste (anko, an Asian staple made from azuki beans)- braided, gorgeous deliciousness.

I make it maybe twice a year and it's more of an event than birthdays.
 
Gene Short
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Thank you for the reply. Geno
 
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Here is an answer that is not what you're looking for, but still may be interesting to read: I've made bread that replaced the water with bean liquid for the benefits of flavor + not needing water. Still got a great rise from the loaves (bolillo rolls for Mexican tortas).
Another thing- if using standard flours that bind well and yeast/starter that gives a good rise, beans/lentils could totally be mixed in either whole or as dollops of refried bean type consistency... just another beany idea!
 
Gene Short
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Thanks for the interesting information. Geno
 
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Could you use bean flour like you would potatoes in potato bread
 
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In the Bible, Ezekiel was told to live on this bread for 390 days: (just thought I'd mention it)  ... with lentils
https://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/Ezekiel-4-9/

There's also a kind of bread you can buy called "Ezekiel bread," apparently with the grains sprouted, plus there are recipes for "Ezekiel bread" online.
https://mybios.me/ezekiel-bread-nutrition-label/
 
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When I saw this thread, I remembered seeing a bean bread recipe on King Arthur Flour's website.

This is an interesting Bean Bread as the mixture is wrapped in corn husks and placed in boiling water, then simmered for 45 minutes.

https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/recipes/modern-masa-cherokee-bean-bread-recipe
 
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Hi Jenn,

Maybe 10 years ago there was a site on the net selling flour mix for Ezekiel Bread.   I took the time to checkout the nutrition provided by (if it was turned into bread), it looked like it was pretty complete.
 
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I've added lightly-soaked lentils to bread recipes many times to great success. Most of the replies here seem to be about using bean flours rather than whole beans, but I thought I'd put this forward as well.
 
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Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book has a Black bean bread recipe.

Two cups dried beans, cooked w 2 cups cooking liquid to 5 cups we flour

Great for sandwiches , soup, or salad


Gene Short wrote:What beans can be used in making a loaf of bread and which ones are the best.

 
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I can't do wheat and so have made lots of bready things out of legume flours.  In general though, they tend to make a very gloppy batter/dough with no cohesion of gluten and so are limited to flat-ish breads like pitas, pancakes, croquettes, -OR if you're ok with the use of a microwave, muffins, cakes and other quickbreads can be achieved through that method of heating.  Otherwise they are unlikely ever to get properly done in the middle.  And you for sure want legumes properly cooked.  Chana dal cornbread/corn muffin/fishcakes are indistinguishable from the real thing.  Red lentils are easy to grind and work well for muffins and cakes.
 
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I've been making quick breads in my new solar oven 😍 lately. I make two mini loaves with 200g of flour, 125g being chickpea. The other 75 is whatever flour I have on hand - millet, barley, buckwheat, oat, etc.  I also add 25g of ground flaxseed, 1tsp baking powder, and 1/4 tsp baking soda. That makes a totally functional, well risen loaf, but it's pretty dry.  I've started adding 1/2c sunflower seed yoghurt and some mashed up fruit. So far I've tried a banana and 60g dried dates soaked and mashed up in some water. Both work well. The sun yoghurt or the fruit on their own isn't enough moisture. You need both. I made one batch with banana and some old coconut yoghurt that was going a bit cheesy. That one was so soft it almost seemed underdone, even though it wasn't.

I haven't used mashed beans in bread, but I think Saralee's on the right track bringing up potato bread. I 'dstart by finding a potato bread recipe and replacing the potatoes with mashed beans.
 
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John Skaggs wrote:I can't do wheat and so have made lots of bready things out of legume flours.  In general though, they tend to make a very gloppy batter/dough with no cohesion of gluten and so are limited to flat-ish breads like pitas, pancakes, croquettes... Otherwise, they are unlikely ever to get properly done in the middle.



John, have you tried chickpea flour? Ive had nothing but good results with it.
 
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