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wound healing with Comfrey and Plantain

 
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I have a wound on my left buttox, it's a pressure ulcer.I sit in a wheelchair all day but it was because of a pulled ingrown hair almost a year ago.incredibly slow healing but great diet. Its about 2cm deep with a diameter of 2mm, smaller than a q-tip without cotton tip. I have been doing a lot of research about using a poultice of Cumfrey leaves and Plantain leaves? I have never done a poultice before and I don't know exactly were to apply it, see the issue im having is that with my wound having such a small diameter I don't want the top to close before the bottom of the wound. I know Comfrey is suppose to help so this doesn't occur. Does anyone have experience with Comfrey? and or making poultices?or recommend something else?
 
steward
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Location: woodland, washington
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I've used comfrey to heal wounds a few times and it has worked well. these were table saw accidents, which aren't very similar to a pressure ulcer. I didn't bother with making a proper poultice, I just used comfrey leaves as bandages by taping them over my wounds. I also used honey as an antibiotic ointment. just an anecdote, but it really seemed to help everything heal up very quickly.

I have been told that comfrey can close a wound before the inside is healed. the advice I received was to draw out any infection with epsom salts and arnica before applying the comfrey.
 
Posts: 75
Location: Arizona low desert
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Comfrey can heal so fast that it locks in an infection. I mix it with golden seal to prevent that. Powdered comfrey, powdered golden seal and aloe vera juice mixed together is my default salve for wounds. I've used it for 20+ years. On healthy people it heals without a scar within 24 hours.
 
Scott Brown
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Ok this helps a lot, but it doesn't have any infection .no smell , regular drainage. It's so close to healing and I would hate for the top to close over. So is comfrey a good recommendation and should i just put it near the wound opening or just near it and let it absorb into my blood?
 
Posts: 1131
Location: Central Wyoming -zone 4
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hugelkultur dog chicken
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from memory i was told by a friend about comfrey one time
her brother had gotten a large chunk of his left buttock(consequently) bitten out by a neighborhood dog, his mother had him chew up some comfrey everyday and covered the wound with it before bandaging it, healed up relatively quick and there was no scar:)
 
Posts: 15
Location: Rice WA Zone 6
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I have heard from a reliable source that honey is very good for healing pressure sores. As for comfrey, years ago my sister had surgery on her neck, so before surgery she drank comfrey tea and afterwards used a comfrey plaster directly on the cut. It healed up so quickly and with so little scaring that the doctor was quite proud of himself! Also, when my niece had a bicycle accident and ripped all the skin off her heel, a comfrey plaster was applied and she healed up in no time with absolutely no scars. I have heard tho, that people that might have a tendency for cancer should not use comfrey because of the way it causes cells to reproduce themselves . The only other thing I have heard is that if it's fed to pigs it causes their meat to be unpleasantly mushy. But the last two items I haven't researched, only hearsay. I hope this is of help to you.
 
Posts: 539
Location: Athens, GA/Sunset, SC
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I have a similar concern.

A doc recently found an inguinal hernia on me...but I can't afford surgery at the moment.

Would a comfrey poultice be a good direction to take? Could anyone point me in the direction of a reputable comfrey creme? With good nutrition, some light exercise, I think I can beat this thing...

Doctors seem to think that surgery is the only mode, but I've read success with standard accessible protocols, such as trusses, nutrition, ab exercises (Pilates) and herbal remedy with strong historical foundations.

I may create a new post, just thought I'd pose it here...
 
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