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Volkswagen's reforestation project in Puebla

 
Jeffrey Hodgins
Posts: 166
Location: Yucatan Puebla Ontario BC
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http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/volkswagen-de-mexico-improves-water-supplies-around-popocatepetl-1696187.htm

A few years ago livestock owners in the area burned huge sections of forest in order to produce more open pasture. As far as I know the fire went unchecked. I went to city hall to find out if they needed a hand to fight the fire and was told that there was no fire fighting effort taking place at all.

We need to realize when we do a reforestation project in densely populated areas that there are people who depend on the land for their lively hood, protected land or not. I think people would be less prone to burning down the forests if forage bushes were planted or some other income generating plant along with the trees. If the only cash value of a forest is wood then in time wood it will become. And the herds came back the very next day they thought they were goners but they couldn't stay away.
Iv'e never been to Paso de Cortez area (the genaral area of the project) but I'm sure its the same as a few km away where cow dung litters the whole mountain side and cattle can be seen grazing in the distance.



 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9420
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Here is an example of reforestation which works with the economic needs of the people: http://permaculture.org.au/2008/09/24/the-development-of-farmer-managed-natural-regeneration/
 
Walter Jeffries
Posts: 1086
Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
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Funny little thought: 'reforestation' is all the rage but large parts of our planet were grasslands in the past. When the forests moved in they reduced the available resources and biodiversity. I just cut back the forests on our land by about 40 acres to the old settler stone walls to reopen pastures that have been grown over for a hundred years. Since then I've noticed a distinct increase in biodiversity in both plants and animals. There are many birds we had never seen here before that now are thriving in our pastures. The insects too are doing great. More deer as well. I read recently that the greatest biodiversity is along the margins, the areas where there are patches of forest and patches of fields.

Cheers,

-Walter Jeffries
Sugar Mountain Farm
Pastured Pigs, Sheep & Kids
in the mountains of Vermont
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/
 
Jeffrey Hodgins
Posts: 166
Location: Yucatan Puebla Ontario BC
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I would agree that Savannah or intermittently treed areas are the most productive. Over grazing of open areas reduces the productivity by removing the protection from drying out where as in treed areas the tree still provides cover even with constant grazing.

In Australia a study showed that by introducing forage shrubs cattle production per hectare could be doubled. The shrub was a type of Leucaena. The trees have to be mowed if they get to tall so the cows can reach the leaves. I think they should just grow giraffes and let the trees get taller. Llamas are good tree eaters for north america too.
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