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What is the most nutritious green in the entire world?  RSS feed

 
john muckleroy jr
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Something you would plant for a survival crop when the us economy collapses?
 
Judith Browning
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I can't decide between sylvette arugula (a perennial but also reseeds) and lambs quarters (an annual but reseeds easily). Both nutritious, drought tolerent, insect resistant , taste realy good....arugula as a raw green and lambs quarters as a cooked green....and both packed with good nutrition. They have both seen us through gaps in our greens production.

..and bees love arugula flowers (the leaves are still edible while the plant flowers)....I am pretty sure both arugula and lambs quarters would take over if I didn't thin the plants.
 
James Colbert
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Chard has to be somewhere near the top of the list. It has a huge tap root and it can regrow from its stump (i have seen this on numerous occasions). It also seeds freely.
 
Tyler Ludens
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I wouldn't choose just one, some I would choose are: Dandelion, amaranth, collards, kale, flat leaf parsley, purslane,. Depending on where you live, some of these grow as weeds.
 
Morgan Morrigan
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heck with the greens, sweet potatoes !

but lambs quarters can survive the desert sun and low water conditions too.
 
Tyler Ludens
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You can eat Sweet Potato greens.

 
Judith Browning
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Are we supposed to live off of this "most nutritious green" at the end of the world as we know it ....if so then it is sweet potatoes for me too...although I didn't like the greens that I tried I would use them as an excuse to grow the root...


.
 
Tyler Ludens
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I'm not convinced we can live off greens alone (not enough fat), so I hope we don't have to try! I've always snuck Sweet Potato greens in with other things, cooked or salads. Not sure I'd like them just by themselves. But I think diversity is a survival strategy (don't put all your eggs in one basket!) so I hope we can have more than one kind of plant to live on......plus maybe some animals.....
 
John Polk
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spinach and Swiss chard contain oxalates which bind iron making it almost entirely unavailable for absorption


The above quote from Wikipedia shows the importance of diversity in diet. If you relied on either spinach or chard for your iron, you could easily become anemic, and get kidney stones from all of those oxalates.

I believe that everybody should strive to have multiple sources of each required nutrient. If one crop fails, you have not left a hole in your diet, and health.

 
Judith Browning
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I think the OP was trying to get a list of top nutritious greens not really to look for one to live off of.....I was just trying to answer the original question...I think we all know about growing and eatting a diverse assortment of plants....(I would insert a smiley face here if I could)
 
Devon Olsen
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purslane and hemp are the first two to come to mind...
purslane is easy and one of the most nutritious GREENS around
 
J W Richardson
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Sorry, I don't know what the Mgost nutritious is, but you can add nettles and molokhia to the list of "loaded". Molokhia seems to need a lot of heat.
 
Kelson Water
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i like seaweed. dandelion. arugula. purslane. mint. . chia seeds supposidly grow in hot dry conditions and the greens are editable, so i've heard, the seeds have omega oils in them. i picked some purslane today and noticed their sand-like (size wise) seeds, which contain omega oils, too. planning on saving some purslane seeds for next year. i am curious about growing algea to eat it.
 
Josh Jamison
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Moringa!!! Check out the nutrition stats. It is higher in nutrition than any other green known to man.
 
Burra Maluca
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If you want a staple crop, you could do worse than Portuguese Galega cabbage. Everyone here grows a patch of them right outside the back door. They live for at least two years, longer if you remove the flowers. You can harvest just a few leaves at a time, at any time of year, so if you plant enough there is a supply of greens every single day of the year. They seed freely, you can eat the young flowers as a kind of sprouting broccoli, you can sprout the seeds and eat them as greens. They might not be the most nutritious, but they are always there ready to pad out whatever else you can find to eat, or to keep you fed on days you can't find anything else.



I have a load of seed, if anyone wants me to send them a few.
 
john muckleroy jr
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Do you think the portuguese galega cabbage would grow in east texas?
 
Kelson Water
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wow!
 
Burra Maluca
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John, I'm not exactly familiar with the climate of east Texas, but they cope well with our dry, hot summers (up to around 44C 111F), winter frosts of at least -5C 23F, sometimes lower, and weeks and weeks of rain a couple of times over the winter. PM me if you want me to send you some seeds. I have some 'general' seed from random plants in the cabbage patch, and also seed saved from that purple plant in the photo. It looks to me like most of the seed from the purple plant is purple, while almost all of the seed from the green plants is not purple, so I'm guessing you can tell the colour of the adult plant from the seed.
 
John Polk
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Is that what they call "couve portuguesa" or "couve-galega"? (which I believe is 'collard greens')

Those sure look like healthy plants...abundant greens in your climate.
 
Burra Maluca
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John Polk wrote:Is that what they call "couve portuguesa" or "couve-galega"? (which I believe is 'collard greens')

Those sure look like healthy plants...abundant greens in your climate.


Yes - that's the stuff. It's certainly *similar* to collard greens though maybe not the exact same genetics.

And of course they're healthy plants - we put a whole year's humanure under that patch! Properly composted, so don't worry...
 
Paulo Bessa
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john muckleroy jr wrote:Something you would plant for a survival crop when the us economy collapses?


john muckleroy jr wrote:What is the most nutritious green in the entire world?


There are two different questions.

Nutrient-rich crops include perennial collards, nettles, moringa leaves, amaranth leaves. These give you lots of vitamins and minerals but no calories. If you eat only these you will starve, unless you eat meat and oils/fats, or carbohydrates (like rice, pasta, potatoes, cereals).

You can plant a few selected survival crops, crops which you could rely in case the economy would collapse. You would feed on them, mostly starches (cereals and potatoes), oils (nuts, sunflower, sesame, chia) and proteins (pulses). Some crops are even more adapted to difficult conditions than more conventional crops (rye as opposed to wheat, millet and sorghum as opposed to corn, quinoa and amaranth, and some pulses like cowpeas are more dought resuistant than most beans). Then you have nuts as a very reliable perennial. I love amaranth and chia because they not only are calory rich but also very nutritious. Sweet potatoes is another nice crop, as well as yams (dioscorea), dates are highly productive too, etc... Alternative perennial roots include groundnut and arrowhead (both quite calorie rich), and perennial pulses like pigeon peas or lima beans. If you have little land, potatoes is a clever choice, lots of food in a small space.

Combine this with some beans and some collards and you have a survivable living.

 
Matt River
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Tunips, beets, and radishes all have edible greens, all nutritious, plus you get a storable root and making your own seed is not that difficult. Lambsquarter is not just edible, it is really really good, better than spinach in my opinion. It is also extraordinarily tough, outcompetes everything, grows everywhere, and makes plenty of seed. Even pigweed is edible. A great tool for homesteading or survival/disaster preparation is a book on wild edible plants and a book on mushroom identification. Many plants are medicinal, many others can be used to make teas rich in specific vitamins even if they are not directly edible. Pines and fir tips made into tea cure scurvy through Vit C and are also used to make beverages. Birch and many other trees have twigs, bark, or tips that make excellent flavorings.
 
Theodore Heistman
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It actually might be Garlic mustard. I am not even joking. It has a lot of protein and Omega 3 fat in it.
 
john muckleroy jr
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Garlic mustard?I've never heard of it.Where can I get some seed?
 
Matthew Fallon
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john muckleroy jr wrote:Garlic mustard?I've never heard of it.Where can I get some seed?


garlic mustard grows wild and is an early spring green around me, i can try collecting seeds next spring if anyone wants some...they grow all over! i end up pulling a lot out, same as with wood sorrel and purslane (though i try to use them up if i can) it tastes exactly as the name implies, definitely an addition to a salad,not the main green! it'd be like eating a whole bowl of nothing but dandelion leaves (yuck!)

i've heard several herbalists claim purslane as the 'most nutrient rich".
green dean's one of my personal faves, i totally agree with him on NOT buying purslane seeds, i had some and they were weaklings!



amaranth leaves are great too as someone else mentioned, i have red amaranth and man does it Spread! but very easy to just yank the whole plant if its crowding other things. in india it's known as 'red spinach' which is a really apt name for it. you can make lots of things fromt he seed head too, gluten free baked goods, pop it like corn, make pudding etc. its very high in iron for one thing..
 
john muckleroy jr
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That would be great if you could send me some seed.Let me know I'll pay you or send you something from down here you don't have up there.This is east texas it will be interesting to see if it will grow down here.
 
Shawn Harper
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So I wouldn't mind seed for garlic mustard also... I love garlic and mustard, sounds like a nice staple green to me.
 
Matthew Fallon
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i did a quick search and found that you can buy them online too'

probably a better option than waiting for my seeds! you'd have them to eat this coming spring rather than in 2 years.

it's also known as 'jack by the hedge' ,considered invasive weed and hated by some gardeners ( the non-permie thinking type)



http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Salad-Garlic-Mustard-Jack-Hedge-500-seed-/220825880354

 
Theodore Heistman
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You guys are joking about wanting garlic mustard seed right? I am half convinced you are kidding and half thinking you are not! haha! Anyway its considered an invasive species and I'm pretty sure it would be illegal to imprt into your area. It might already be there. I am pretty sure it can survive anywhere.

I like making it in omlettes, that way it retains some the the garlicky flavor. If you cook it you just get the mustard flavor. Its a nice bitter green. I happen to like bitter greens but I like to mix them up too. I really like purslane also but the flavor is really subtle to me. I did read that that purslane is one of the most nutrient dense greens.
 
Colleen Peltomaa
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Matthew Fallon wrote:
john muckleroy jr wrote:Garlic mustard?I've never heard of it.Where can I get some seed?


garlic mustard grows wild and is an early spring green around me, i can try collecting seeds next spring if anyone wants some...they grow all over! i end up pulling a lot out, same as with wood sorrel and purslane (though i try to use them up if i can) it tastes exactly as the name implies, definitely an addition to a salad,not the main green! it'd be like eating a whole bowl of nothing but dandelion leaves (yuck!)

i've heard several herbalists claim purslane as the 'most nutrient rich".
green dean's one of my personal faves, i totally agree with him on NOT buying purslane seeds, i had some and they were weaklings!



amaranth leaves are great too as someone else mentioned, i have red amaranth and man does it Spread! but very easy to just yank the whole plant if its crowding other things. in india it's known as 'red spinach' which is a really apt name for it. you can make lots of things fromt he seed head too, gluten free baked goods, pop it like corn, make pudding etc. its very high in iron for one thing..



I know this post is old, but last year I pulled a bunch of wild greens and instead of making a salad I rinsed and juiced them in a masticating juicer. Dark green juice, and I added stevia to taste and down the hatch it went The pulp goes into the compost pile.
 
Kitty Hudson
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'Old' but worth maintaining in this economic climate...and one never knows when one's own livelihood/finances will be devestated (I'm a nurse--all it takes is one bad accident sometimes and a person can no longer work in their chosen field). No one green will give you everything you need, but knowing your local edible weeds will provide you with variety. Here in SW KY, wild greens (some sort of escaped turnip like Seven Top I think) are not uncommon, nor is wild asparagus rown form bird-scattered seeds...usually I see it along fencelines. Lamb's quarters have already been mentioned.

Perennial greens: sorrel and leaves of horseradish are tasty, though I prefer them in small doses added to other things. Garlic chives are a seasoning, but I do add them liberally to soups and salads.

Think about dual purpose crops as well. Leaves of yardlong beans, beets, turnips, grain amaranth, radish and many others are edible...just pick a leaf at a time from each plant in a row and you'll have plenty for a salad or 'mess' of greens without affecting the production of the plants.

Winter hardy greens that can be harvested all winter long are great too--kale, collards, mustards, etc.

(Not to mention that there are other uses for some of these as well--Hopi Red Dye Amaranth and Bulls Blood Beets are used for red dye as well as food, Radishes--which bolt fast--have seeds well suited to sprouting)

Between dual purpose plants, wildlings, a few perennials here and there, and combining plantings (winter greens started when the beans are fading, quick growing radishes harvested from the same bed just as the amaranth is getting big), a person need not have a large garden to provide them with a lot of greens (But a big freezer would be mighty handy).

 
Matt Smith
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John Polk wrote:I believe that everybody should strive to have multiple sources of each required nutrient. If one crop fails, you have not left a hole in your diet, and health.


Bingo.
 
wayne stephen
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Don't forget seven top turnip greens . After the season you have roots or let go to seed. They are fast , cut and they grow back . They would go well with survival bacon or ham. I also like them with white beans , olive oil , and garlic. They are cheap and you can plant them in a food plot for venison.
 
Colleen Peltomaa
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Kitty Hudson wrote:'Old' but worth maintaining in this economic climate...and one never knows when one's own livelihood/finances will be devestated (I'm a nurse--all it takes is one bad accident sometimes and a person can no longer work in their chosen field). No one green will give you everything you need, but knowing your local edible weeds will provide you with variety. Here in SW KY, wild greens (some sort of escaped turnip like Seven Top I think) are not uncommon, nor is wild asparagus rown form bird-scattered seeds...usually I see it along fencelines. Lamb's quarters have already been mentioned.

Perennial greens: sorrel and leaves of horseradish are tasty, though I prefer them in small doses added to other things. Garlic chives are a seasoning, but I do add them liberally to soups and salads.

Think about dual purpose crops as well. Leaves of yardlong beans, beets, turnips, grain amaranth, radish and many others are edible...just pick a leaf at a time from each plant in a row and you'll have plenty for a salad or 'mess' of greens without affecting the production of the plants.

Winter hardy greens that can be harvested all winter long are great too--kale, collards, mustards, etc.

(Not to mention that there are other uses for some of these as well--Hopi Red Dye Amaranth and Bulls Blood Beets are used for red dye as well as food, Radishes--which bolt fast--have seeds well suited to sprouting)

Between dual purpose plants, wildlings, a few perennials here and there, and combining plantings (winter greens started when the beans are fading, quick growing radishes harvested from the same bed just as the amaranth is getting big), a person need not have a large garden to provide them with a lot of greens (But a big freezer would be mighty handy).

[/quote


So, the consensus is there is more than one "most nutritious" green, so I personally narrowed it down to "...and grows like a weed...". Hubby has been working double shifts (on call) and he is not tired at all and I see him eating bags of raw kale. Myself, I would juice it mostly and add some stevia. We also have a stock of blue green algae powder. I hope everyone here gets closer to being self-producing regards nutritious greens.

 
john muckleroy jr
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Will the seven top turnip green produce year after year?
 
wayne stephen
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Seven tops are annuals - They may come up again but the greens are bitter and the roots are woody. However they can be cut during the season , will seed and will come up early the next spring after sowing. Not alot of work . Hopefully the survival crisis will be short. Also , they are a favorite here and further south , so they will be tradeable in the market.
 
John Saltveit
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Don't forget kale, the unofficial vegetable of Portland.

Also, cress-shotweed, people curse it until the find it tastes good and is amazingly nutritious. Both are on Dr. Joel Fuhrman's list of 100 rated vegetables.
John S
PDX OR
 
Casey Williams
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I also vote for Moringa. It is crazy nutritious.

Additionally, you can eat almost every part of the tree, it grows really fast and is drought tolerant, AND its seeds can purify water!
 
Thekla McDaniels
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I can't believe only one mention of Moringa.  I guess the majority of people with computes have not been made aware of it.  Though it does not survive frozen ground, otherwise it is near impossible to kill, and has some great applications (water purification) other than nutritional.

Well worth looking in to.  If you have or can create a frost free soil situation, it's a viable option.

Here are three links
http://miracletreenutrition.com/miracle-tree/moringa-nutrition/

https://themoringa.com/nutritional-values

http://www.treesforlife.org/our-work/our-initiatives/moringa/nutritional-information

I would want a mix of greens, and in addition to moringa, I would want lambsquarters, also called goosefoot, and amaranth (eat the seeds and the foliage) because they grow without any help, as well as kale spinach arugula and the great other suggestions.

Are radish leaves palatable?  I've never eaten them, but, and I guess this is off topic, it would contribute to the health of the soil which would be supporting the growth of those highly nutritious greens.
 
Sue Rine
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I'd definitely go with variety too, but...my all time favourite is kale. My children say they're going to bury me under a kale bush when the time comes.
My husband and I were involved with a landscaping job in our nearby town years ago. We planted some flowering cherry trees and spread some of my compost around it. A few months later I drove by and to my delight and amusement there was a fine crop of kale growing around the cherry trees.
 
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