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Another identification conundrum  RSS feed

 
Posts: 49
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I discovered this in my father-in-law's pasture in the tree line, it was pretty large tree with little purple berry-like fruit. Any idea? A coworker suggested it being some relation to a wild plum variety.
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pic one
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pic two
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pic three
 
Posts: 45
Location: Southern Ohio (zone 6a)
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How many seeds does the fruit have in it?

Multiple seeds in the middle (like an apple or rose hip) mean it's probably a wild apple or pear. A single see (pit) then I'd guess it's in the viburnum genus or could be a wild plum (if so then try tasting it, both species have edible fruit). If I had to guess I'd say it's a Viburnum.
 
Posts: 166
Location: Yucatan Puebla Ontario BC
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I think its a Prunis of some kind it doesn't have the serration on the leaves that the Viburnums seem to have. The proof is in the pit. Break the pit open and if it smells like an almond than its most likely a Prunis.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1450
Location: northern California
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I wonder if it could be black gum, Nyssa sylvatica?
 
Justin Koenig
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Well, I think I figured out the type of tree it is by researching all your suggestions, and it appears to be a black gum, Nyssa sylvatica. It does indeed have a single pit, and the leaves seem to match the photos I found online. So thank you to everyone for your help.
 
Posts: 107
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Looks like you have found a treat

http://www.eattheweeds.com/nyssus-tart-botanical-tangles-2/
 
Tick check! Okay, I guess that was just an itch. Oh wait! Just a tiny ad:
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https://permies.com/t/92034/permaculture-projects/days-natural-building-wofati-cob
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