Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Sweet Potato Leaves Are Edible Raw!

 
Posts: 299
Location: Portland, Oregon Maritime, temperate, zone 7-8.
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Sweet potato leaves are edible raw!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okZ4jB113C8

A good hot weather green. The vines really put out a lot of leaves fast.

I just stuck Sweet Potatoes half way in the ground in the shade and waited. A critter ate the Garnet Yam (actually all yams that they sell or grow in the US are sweet potatoes - weird, but true) so I tried again, burying the whole thing. Jewel Yams and Garnet Yams and Asian Sweet Potatoes produced leaves fastest for me. The plain old pale Sweet Potato was very slow. I am not going to try that again.

I started them in pots and will transplant. It seemed like the best thing to do since I started this experiment in the heat of August, and doubted that they would be happy rooting in that heat.

I have eaten the leaves raw, and they are definitely OK. A little bland, with a little spicyness. They are a little mucilaginous, but not bad.

I hope this is useful information.

Pamela Melcher
 
pollinator
Posts: 1523
Location: northern California
150
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I did not know sweet potato greens were edible till I lived in Bangladesh. They eat the greens of all sorts of stuff there...squashes, gourds, luffas, cowpeas, jute....I found out you can pick up to 20% of the greens and not inhibit the yield of the roots. However, I never got into eating them raw...just a bit too bitter for my taste most likely. There is a related plant, Kangkong or water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) which is definitely a bland salad green, and is a major cooking green in much of SE Asia. In Georgia where I lived for years, both of these provided much of my greens through the long hot summers when not many other greens would grow.....
 
Pamela Melcher
Posts: 299
Location: Portland, Oregon Maritime, temperate, zone 7-8.
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


Thanks, Alder,

I want to learn about many hot weather salad greens, preferably perennials.

 
Posts: 107
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
To add to this knowledge, check out this article: http://www.eattheweeds.com/ipomoea-water-land-see-in-gardens/

Between that site and this one I have learned SO MUCH. Anytime I can't identify a plant, these are the two sites I use
 
Pamela Melcher
Posts: 299
Location: Portland, Oregon Maritime, temperate, zone 7-8.
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ashley,

Wow, thanks for referring me to that website. What a treasure trove!
 
Posts: 7051
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1070
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I really like all kinds of greens both domestic and wild including poke and perilla and different flavors, bitters, but I am not findig the taste of my sweet potato vine pleasent or even interesting...pretty much not palatable for us, both cooked and raw. I am wondering if everyone is eatting the heart shaped leafed varieties. Mine is an old variety...I don't know the name...with a deeply cut leaf. Maybe that's why it doesnt taste all that good.
 
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I tried Sweet Potato leaves recently. They are not bad, not great either. I tasted them in the raw, maybe they will be better cook.
 
Ashley Handy
Posts: 107
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It might be one of those things where it is all in the flavoring. I personally don't like cooked greens unless they have some sort of distinct flavor. I used an Emeril recipe I found online to cook kale, worried that I wouldn't like it once I got it cooked. It was the most fabulous thing I've ever eaten!

This is the recipe:

http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/emerils-sauteed-tuscan-kale-recipe.htm

Sometimes I make it with the beans, sometimes I don't. I think it is that lemon juice that really makes it sing:)
 
pollinator
Posts: 1454
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
34
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Great recipe Ashley. I will probably try that today.

I eat the tender tips of the sweet potato vine. I just saute any and all greens lightly until just wilted. Tougher greens get sliced into ribbons or minced to keep from having to cook them very long.

I picked up an awful cold at work so I'm thinking a big plate of fresh greens and garlic from the garden would be just the thing today.
 
You've gotta fight it! Don't give in! Read this tiny ad:
Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!