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What do you do with your pickling water?

 
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I recently discovered Pickled Onions forever - basically, sliced red onion, 50/50 hot vinegar water solution with some salt. I love them on almost anything, especially in cheese sandwiches and tacos. But what do I do with the liquid that’s left over when all the onion has gone? There must be something I can do with it. What do you do with your left over pickle water?
 
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You could use the juice as the base for a meat marinade. I've done this before using the juice from both green and black olives.

We do wild fermentation of our veg and drink an ounce or two of the juice in the morning. It's a nice way to get some probiotics, but vinegar brine doesn't have the probiotics so I don't know if this is useful.
 
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Um. I put more onions in it. That's the "forever" part of it. You just keep adding them, top up liquid as you need to. I have had batches run 9 months or more before I started them over.

Sometimes I steal some as a salad dressing base.
 
Edward Norton
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[quote=Robin Katz] You could use the juice as the base for a meat marinade. I've done this before using the juice from both green and black olives.

We do wild fermentation of our veg and drink an ounce or two of the juice in the morning. It's a nice way to get some probiotics, but vinegar brine doesn't have the probiotics so I don't know if this is useful. [/quote]

Good idea on the marinade. I’ve been adding little bits to stews and other dishes where a bit of acid often helps balance the dish.

I also wild ferment and the juice is great when added to a glass of water.
 
Edward Norton
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Um. I put more onions in it. That's the "forever" part of it. You just keep adding them, top up liquid as you need to. I have had batches run 9 months or more before I started them over.

Sometimes I steal some as a salad dressing base.



Ummm . . .  *Slaps head*!

Good idea on the salad dressing although I’m the only person who likes the onion / vinegar combo . . . And my teenagers are both salad dodgers!
 
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I'm not sure about pickled onions... but dill pickles, I often use the water in.... rye bread. It is almost a magic ingredient. I imagine any vinegary-salty liquid of this type would work the same.
I haven't used this particular recipe, but it looks similar to the one I usually use.
https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/recipes/sandwich-rye-bread-recipe
 
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Tereza Okava wrote:I'm not sure about pickled onions... but dill pickles, I often use the water in.... rye bread. It is almost a magic ingredient. I imagine any vinegary-salty liquid of this type would work the same.
I haven't used this particular recipe, but it looks similar to the one I usually use.
https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/recipes/sandwich-rye-bread-recipe



Great idea Tereza. I just had a look through ‘The handmade loaf’ by Dan Lepard and he has a rye loaf that includes pickle juice. I have rye flour and my regular sourdough normally has 10% rye. That’s a great recipe you’ve linked too as well and includes an optional use for sour dough discard. Cheers.
 
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Odd thought: use it to season focaccha? Generally a salty flat bread, and I've cooked it with red onions on tip before, so seems like a logical extension.

Also: mayo calls for vinegar, so maybe try making mayo with it? Water aspect might be less desirable, bit maybe worth a try :)
 
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Did somebody already say put some in the soup? Especially borscht that already has vinegar and onions and salt? You would just have to cut back on the vinegar and salt that was added new
 
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I would pour a bit in the cracks in the drive to kill the weeds.
 
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What do you do with your pickling water?

Put some hard-boiled eggs in that pickling water:



https://permies.com/t/58881/leftover-pickle-juice
 
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I make a salad with pickled onions, and some of the juice, mandarin oranges, and black olives on lettuce from the garden.

I do reuse pickling liquid, as you suggest. Pickle beets first then use that lovely red liquid to pickle hard boiled eggs. They are so pretty when sliced in half.
 
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Try a shot of pickle juice for immediate relief of muscle cramps. Google "pickle juice for muscle cramps". Research shows when pickle juice  hits the back of the throat, it triggers a response similar to drinking electrolytes.
 
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Anne Miller wrote:What do you do with your pickling water?

Put some hard-boiled eggs in that pickling water:



https://permies.com/t/58881/leftover-pickle-juice



I do that with the brine from my pickled beets. Makes lovely lavender/maroon eggs depending on how long the eggs soak.
 
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A friend of mine makes a potato salad using pickles and pickle juice rather than mayo, I love it! Why not try that with your onion pickles? Sounds delicious to me....
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Probably worth mentioning somewhere in this thread that pickling to prevent spoilage depends on the concentrations of salt and vinegar and sugar in the brine, and as we reuse the brine these ingredients are depleted as they flavor the vegetables or eggs and diluted as water comes out of the vegetables into the brine.

If  we are pickling to preserve we need to replenish the concentrations of salt and vinegar and sugar up to whatever the original concentrations were
 
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When I make chutney, I substitute up to a third of the total vinegar with pickle juice depending on the concentration of the juice. Homemade pickled onions juice is much stronger than commercial pickled gherkins so can sub 1-1 for vinegar and the sugar & salt needs to be adjusted too.
 
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Tereza Okava wrote:I'm not sure about pickled onions... but dill pickles, I often use the water in.... rye bread. It is almost a magic ingredient. I imagine any vinegary-salty liquid of this type would work the same.
I haven't used this particular recipe, but it looks similar to the one I usually use.
https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/recipes/sandwich-rye-bread-recipe



Interesting...*finds a dark hole from the heat to ponder this more*
 
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My kids just drink it, not necessarily onion pickle juice, but dill pickle juice. It's actually become a popular drink chaser, for example a shot of vodka with a pickle back.
 
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How do the hard boiled eggs come up and taste like after immersion in the liquid?
 
John C Daley
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Is refrigeration important?
 
Anne Miller
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John C Daley wrote:Is refrigeration important?



When I was a kid, a lot of neighborhood stores would have big jars of pickled eggs sitting on the counter without refrigeration.

In today's world that would never happen.

In real life, I feel it depends.  Probably something to do with percentages or strength of the vinegar or what kind of pickling solution was used, etc.
 
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