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Septoria on tomatoes and a few other plants

 
Jay Freeman
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I had been wondering why my tomatoes were developing spots on the leaves and found out that its called septoria which is caused by a fungus.

There are a number of suggestions to spray on the leaves including peroxide which I am planning on trying.

I'm just wondering if anyone else has had this problem and whether they found a remedy.
 
David Rogers
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You have a mineral deficiency. I would guess, Calcium, Potassium, Copper or Sulfur.

Perhaps you might read The Ideal Soil by Michael Astera available from www.soilminerals.com

Dave Rogers
 
Shawn Harper
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Location: Portlandia, Oregon
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Next year you might try giving them a friendly fungus to chill with. Rumor has it that it helps repel the bad fungi.
 
maje culture
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I have tried before mixing 1 tbsp. of baking soda with 1 tbsp. of salt and 2 tbsp. of olive oil in a liter of water and apply the mixture to the plants with a spray bottle. It looks like it works, but mostly as prevention measure. You could add cinnamon to the mixture to strengthen.

 
Rion Mather
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I usually treat my plants with an organic fungicide even when there are no obvious symptoms of disease. I would recommend that if you live in a wet climate.
 
julian kirby
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Save any seeds from the affected plants that did the best/plants that were not affected. the next generation should be a little bit more resistant.

"tomato seed has been shown to carry spores and produce infected seedlings, but whether the pathogen is truly seedborne is unknown." http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/factsheets/Tomato_Septoria.htm

although the literature states that the seeds may be contaminated, as Shawn said inoculating with beneficial fungi could help. You can coat the seed before planting and hopefully the good will outgrow the bad. I recommend culturing from one of your uninfected beds, if you go with a store bought blend maybe try something with more Trichoderma in it.
Trichoderma
Another consideration if one is contemplating purchasing one of the myco-mixes on the market, is if it contains Trichoderma spores. Because Trichoderma is so much cheaper, the spore count for it in these mixes usually eclipses all the other organisms put together. Unlike endomycorrhizal fungi, Trichoderma requires no root contact to sprout and grow. In addition to this, its favorite food is…..wait for it…..wait for it….other fungi! So you guess what happens if you inoculate your roots with a mix that contains 10,000 spores per gram of Trichoderma and 100 spores per gram total of other fungal species which are slow to sprout.

http://forum.grasscity.com/organic-growing/976433-mycorrhizal-fungi%3B-myths-truths.html
There are quite a few Myco-related links sorry about posting a link to grasscity, but I am giving sources for information's sake

Also try neem meal. to apply as a spray put 1/3-1 cup into a five gallon bucket of water, use an aquarium bubbler and an air stone, bubble for 4-6 hours to release the oils from the meal, strain, then apply this mix at roughly a 1 to 10 ratio of water(may vary I've used a 1 to 5 ratio), you can spray plants the next day but is only necessary when hot, repeat weekly for safety's sake. The effects on squash heavily infected with powdery mildew was a death of all sporing bodies, heavily infected leaves and stem died, minimally infected tissue died, but a majority of each plant survived.

http://www.greenstone.org/greenstone3/nzdl;jsessionid=22574BA99E15534EE182EAB7C3B6198C?a=d&c=envl&d=HASH01462dfbcb8f8d8b5899d364.7.np&sib=1&p.s=ClassifierBrowse&p.sa=&p.a=b
 
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