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Oregon farmer eaten...

 
John Polk
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While looking at the local news' web site I found this:

http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Authorities-Oregon-farmer-eaten-by-his-hogs-172184481.html

That's recycling at the extreme!
 
Dale Hodgins
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Millions of pigs eaten by humans every year and they just sit back and take it. Maybee it will end like the Hitchcock movie with a mass revolt and thousands eaten. The herd could use some thinning. >
 
John Polk
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What if we're not kosher? Would they use that to our disadvantage? Gotta draw a line somewhere.

 
Alison Thomas
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Oh goodness what a way to go!

Since we have pigs - currently 13, unlucky for some! - I hope that there isn't a mass revolt. Some of our guys are pretty big, but none are agressive. Only had one bitey pig and she's now 'gone'.
 
R Scott
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Not the first time I have heard of it.

I hope it was a heart attack.
 
Dale Hodgins
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John Polk wrote:What if we're not kosher? Would they use that to our disadvantage? Gotta draw a line somewhere.



I'm pretty sure pork isn't kosher.

In New Guinea there were tribes who referred to human meat as long pork. Yum.

While in Buffalo NY, I saw quite a few folks who looked like they could compete with those hogs in a chow down contest. Must be the wings.
 
Walter Jeffries
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*grin* What the vegans fail to understand is that the livestock are perfectly willing to eat us if the tables are turned. We are all a part of nature and the food web.

Most likely he had a heart attack or something, fell down, died. Later the pigs poked him to see what was up. When he didn't respond they took an experimental bite. When he didn't object they took a second - one thing leads to another. Their thinking is waste-not-want-not.
 
Julia Winter
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I was told that the Fijian term for human was "long pig." That is, back in the days when they ate people.
 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
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One of my great uncles had his leg gored off and eaten by a pig. Because of that I have never been comfortable around pigs. They do a wonderful service out in the field but I have never felt that I could handle them safely.
 
Alison Thomas
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Jeanine Gurley wrote:One of my great uncles had his leg gored off and eaten by a pig.


Gross. Did the pig knock him unconscious or did it just chew his leg off whilst he 'stood' there?
 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
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I don't remember whether it was a female or a male. (my aunt always said to be careful about the females with babies) but it charged him and cornered him in a pen and he couldn't get away from it. Fortunately there were people at the farm that day that heard him yelling for help.

This happened over 40 years ago so I know it was not the type of chemically induced behavior that we sometimes see today.

I think that this was just normal behavior for a pig who felt its territory was threatened. They do it to each other all of the time but their bodies are not as fragile as ours.

Just like horses that kick and bite each other - they are somewhat bruised or cut but the same kick or bite to one of us humans could seriously injure or kill. I believe that we just need to have a deep respect for our fellow animals when we confine them and understand that these things are bound to happen sooner or later.

I had a horse rear up and strike me right on top of the head one time - I was lucky to not be seriously injured - but he was not used to being handled much in confined spaces and I was moving too fast for his comfort. Had I been a little more patient and watchful of his body language it might not have happened.
 
John Polk
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That is an excellent point about body language.

Whenever we have 'nothing better to do', we should carefully observe all of our animals. Their body language can tell us a lot about what is going on inside their heads.

 
Kevin Longeway
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I grew up with cattle and we had some that would walk right up to you in the pen for a neck scratch. When they had new calves though, always show caution to see how they will react. Not many would but we always had a couple that would charge us no matter how friendly they were. Pigs would not be any different except for the eating you part
 
David Hartley
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I live a few miles south of where this happened... A few friends said he was anti-social and had post-war "issues"... Kept to himself and his livestock... I'm guessing it was a heart attack {shrug}
 
Alison Thomas
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Jeanine Gurley wrote:I don't remember whether it was a female or a male. (my aunt always said to be careful about the females with babies) but it charged him and cornered him in a pen and he couldn't get away from it. Fortunately there were people at the farm that day that heard him yelling for help.

This happened over 40 years ago so I know it was not the type of chemically induced behavior that we sometimes see today.

I think that this was just normal behaviour for a pig who felt its territory was threatened.


When I read out your post about your uncle to my OH he was SO sceptical and poo-poo-ed it. HOWEVER, we have been looking after my friend's farm for 10 days and she has 4 pigs, all were piglets from our litters, all male, all UNcastrated. There is definitely a 'king' amongst them and he always has to eat first whilst shoving the others out of the way. When my OH returned from the farm last weekend he said "You know how some lucky soldiers were saved from being shot by having a cigarette case in their pocket, well..."
It went like this.....

My OH was just doing the normal rounds, the pigs were eating and he was doing their water. The 'king' rushed over for a drink then went back to eating so my OH continued to fill the water trough. All of a sudden the 'king' turned round and charged him and bit him on the thigh. Luckily he had an MP3 player in his pocket which took the brunt of it (that was the parallel with the cigarette cases) but he still got a whacking graze and a massive compression bruise. He threw the water and the bucket over the pig which was enough to give him a moment to stumble through the mud to get out. He said that it was a good job that it hadn't been raining as the mud just would have been so slippery that he didn't know if he could have got out quickly enough and there was no-one there to help him as the farm is quite remote (we live 10 miles away). Now he can see how things like this happen!! We think that there is a wild boar female in the area and that the 'king' is establishing superiority. My OH was doing the bulk of the work and a neighbour was checking the animals in the evening (he's not as agile as my OH) - after this, they did both the daily rounds together and my friend returned 4 days later. She has made an arrangement for the butcher to come in!
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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