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Anyone have links for sources on exotic dairy animals?

 
Devon Olsen
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Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
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im curious if anyone has any links to sources for learning about different animals that have been used for dairy throughout history and specifics on those animals?
such as natural habitats?
herd animal or happy alone?
needs lots of space or can do ok with limited space?
nutrition info in milk?
cheese's made with the milk?
diet?
history of dairy use?

i tried a google but of course only pulled up some dairy COW breeds and information lol
i know that there are other animals can be used such as
goats
cattle
on those tow there are plenty of sites on dairy animals of that type and what not if you look but there are other animals i am aware have been used for dairy but i cant seem to find any information on them and what is in there milk nutrition-wise

sheep (i find there are lots of cheese made and i found one site on LIMITED nutrition info, showi9ng one or two things compared to cows milk but i cant find any info on it being drank and whether it tastes decent or not)
water buffalo ( i know it was traditionally what they made mozerella from but i dont know much else)
camel - dont know much of anything other than that some have used it for dairy


again this is just asking if anyone either knows any of these answers or if they know of any sources for finding this info out and feel free to discuss anything related
 
Tyler Ludens
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Devon Olsen
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Thank you Tyler - actually EXTRA thank you tyler, i found even more animals on that site!

so now the list of animals suitable for some form of dairy:

cow
goat
sheep
bactrian camel
Dromedary camel
llama
water buffalo
moose
yak (i forgot about this one)
mare(horse)
Reindeer
Donkey
 
Devon Olsen
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im gonna post nutritional info that i have found about each animal on the site that tyler linked to:
*please keep in mind this is based off of this sites info on BNI, and that as far as i know there is no such thing as perfectly balanced food, this also goes over macronutrients and only one or two micronutrients*

Buffalo milk:

BNI: 104.33
According to the following RDI's:

WHO: 106.27
US/CAN: 89.20
AUS/NZ: 104.33
UK: 100.33

Food, 100ml

Protein:
has: 4.0 ( im not sure of what, perhaps % DV?)
ideal amount according to this site is: 5.0

Carbohydrate:
has: 4.4
ideal: 13.8

Sugar:
has: 4.4
ideal: 2.5

Fat:
has: 7.4
ideal: 2.8

Saturated Fat:
has: 5.8
ideal: 1.1

Fiber:
has: 0.0
ideal: 1.5

Sodium:
has: 0.047
ideal: .1

Kcal:
has: 100.2
ideal: 100.2

Kjul:
has: 419.2
ideal: 419.2

i think ill do each animal in a seperate post... either that or ill just edit this post later

i dont understand all of these numbers to be honest with you but im posting them in hopes that someone else will find them useful and can perhaps tell me, based on these numbers which one is the best nutritionally, if any
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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I think donkeys were the first dairy animals, and have milk very similar to human's milk.
 
Devon Olsen
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Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
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thank you for the contribution abe, i think ill give up on putting down the info for each animal but if anyone else wants to add anything feel free
 
Joseph Fields
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Location: Berea, Kentucky
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I had cream made from water buffalo a couple times and it was awesome. I think you could put coolwhip out of business if you could market it.
 
Paz Zait-Givon
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Pretty much all of those animals listed above are social herd or pack animals. They are all Ruminants, Equines , or camelids.
So you may want to look into some of the charachteristics those have, ruminants in particular tend to be the most popular.
http://panoptesv.com/RPGs/2d10/Critters/Mammals/Ruminants/Ruminants.html

Ive heard that milking Camels is difficult because you can do it for all of 90 seconds.
http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/dirty-jobs/videos/milking-camels.htm

Sheep milk nutritional analysis here :http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/97/2

Sheep and goats have naturally homogenized milk, apparently so is Buffalo milk
http://www.fairburnwaterbuffalo.com/?what-is-a-water-buffalo,23

Im starting to suspect naturally homogenized milk is the default so cows are really special.

Horses and Donkeys haven't been bred for milk for a very very long time, longer I think than the others so they would likely require the most work for the least return (milkwise)
 
John Polk
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True Mozzarella cheese is made from water buffalo. Serious Italian chefs, in Italy, would not think of using (ersatz) mozzarella made from cow's milk. Here, in the U.S. true mozzarella is rather hard to find. The cheese is from the regions around Napoli, with Mondragone being considered by many to produce some of the finest.

 
Jay Colli
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Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
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Moose aren't social animals but I've never heard of them being milked
 
Devon Olsen
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i would imagine that any information on moose milking was probably done as an experiment to test nutritional value and market potential - rather than an age old practice that somebody learned of, but im really not sure
 
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