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fall is here!!

 
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Aloha from Maine!!
here we are, getting ready for winter and putting the beds to rest. I want to ask all of you what you would do...I have sandy and acidic soil, does this mean it has more nitrogen content??? I am having fifty yards of semi- composted(80%) broken down, manure dropped off and tons of leaves..... my thought is to put a layer of leaves (2in) down and then a layer of compost (2in) on all the beds. in the spring i will till, what do you think??
 
Posts: 91
Location: Portland Maine
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Hello John,

I am in Maine too. Where are you ? I am in Portland.
I do the same to my beds except I shred the leaves with my lawn mower first. Then put the manure then I plant winter rye. In the spring I weed whip the rye then turn everything over.

Karl
 
John Seaver
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We are in Porter! That was my plan, hoping to get winter rye in but may not....our first year on this land. Thanks do you find the rye helps break down the leaves?
 
Karl Teceno
Posts: 91
Location: Portland Maine
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Shredding them helps the most but the winter rye adds tons of biomass/organic matter to the soil with not much effort. Not shredding the leaves tends to make them become a thick, wet mat and takes a lot longer for them to break down.

Karl
 
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