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Passion Flower (Passiflora incarnata) in Zone 7

 
John Seay
Posts: 26
Location: Richmond, Va
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I'll keep this short; but on one of my walkabouts this summer in Richmond Virginia I found a flower that was really amazing and that I'd never seen before. Well today I was reading one of my medicinal plant books and saw it right there in front of me. It was listed as Passion Flower which I then did a quick google search to find that it is passion fruit. It was always my understanding that passion fruit was a warm weather fruit. The hill I found it on is south facing and protected from wind and surrounded by concrete so maybe there is a sufficient micro-climate to keep it protected from frosts. I'll be checking it out this week for sure though to see if there is any fruit to be had.
 
Nicole Castle
Posts: 151
Location: Madison, AL
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What you usually see referred to as food and tastes like Hawaiian Punch is a tropical plant, Passiflora edulis. Then there's what we have, which is Passiflora incarnata, aka maypop. It has edible fruit if you are lucky enough to actually beat the animals to them, but they aren't quite as tasty as the tropical version. Collect fruit when they are turning orange. (There are others in the family, too.)

It's probably too late in the season to collect any fruit. Normally it will fruit about July here and I suspect what you are seeing now will die back before the fruit has a chance to set and mature. It can't hurt to check, but you may want to make a note of the spot and return next year. These vines are very good about reseeding themselves.

Amazing flowers, aren't they?
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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We encourage our wild passion flower vine for the medicinal properties of the leaves, stems and flowers...a wonderful sedative....we gather and dry whole vines when blooming for tea. My understanding is that domestic/ornamental varieties are toxic though...so be sure of your plant. Occasionally we gather fruit but the tiny bit of pulp compared to seed isn't hardly worth it...tastey though.

edit...ours is passiflora incarnata L. with fruit that is ripe when pale greenish yellow and starting to wrinkle.
 
Cris Bessette
gardener
Posts: 764
Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7A
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As an earlier poster said, what you have is the "maypop" version of the passion flower plant. Most of the passion flower species is a tropical plant, but a few are hardy including the maypop.

I have some growing at my house here in zone 7B, the fruit taste just like Hawaiian punch to me.
The flowers are really neat too.
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 379
Location: South West France
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Yes the flowers are lovely - these two varieties aren't hardy outside in Zone 7 but you can bring them in to the heat for a few weeks in winter. The bees love them !






 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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We have a native variety, possibly P. tenuiloba. The flowers and fruits are tiny:

 
Kelson Water
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another name is Crone flower
 
Calvin Mars
Posts: 32
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I grow the maypop varieties in zone 7. I love em. Be careful with ordering them though, there are a lot of cultivars that were bred for flowers and not fruit. Although these cultivars are pretty, smell great, and have useful herbal properties (We like to candy the flowers...), it seems like such a waste to not have the fruit as well. They do have a tendency to ramble a lot, they will spread far from the mother plant and "may pop" up in areas you weren't intending.

I created a shady zone with giant sticks and this vine to grow mushrooms in. I'm starting to run some of them up my mulberry trees to see what happens.

The sterile varieties that don't have juicy yumminess inside the fruit make great clown noses!
 
Micheal Williams
Posts: 1
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John Seay.... I live in Richmond where in Richmond did you find the passion fruit/ flower?
 
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