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neem oil for fleas?

 
Leah Sattler
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I have never used neem oil but it is supposedly and approved organic product. would it kill fleas?
 
Leah Sattler
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well I found several things that say it is used for fleas even though that doesn't state it on the label. I really hate to spray too much of anything that will kill bugs indiscriminitly but DE cost too much to spread in such a large area and it hasnt' proven effective used only in the oft frequented areas. 
 
Susan Monroe
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How much area are you talking about?

A 50-lb bag of DE usually runs around $20-25.  And it's a BIG bag.
 
Leah Sattler
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the whole dog area. we have 2000 feet of fence with the house and garage in the middle so whatever square footage that works out to be.....quite a bit. I can only buy little 8lb bags of DE locally. realistically there is no way I will pay for shipping for big bags. from my understanding I need to treat every week for three weeks. not sure I could count on the DE staying viable with rain (rain may be wishful thinking ) and dew for three weeks. and then there are those that say it doesnt' work that great for fleas since they are hoppers when off dogs not crawlers. I want the fleas GONE!  so maybe next year we won't have to do anything. I guess I've decided I'm willing to trade the not so great answer if it means I have a chance of not having to deal with this kind of infestation again. I never had a flea problem at the old house. it must have something to do with the soil. or lack there of.
 
Leah Sattler
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well its done. we will do weekly treatments to deal with the flea cycle for four weeks. three is recomended but I am hoping to catch any escapees. I just hope it works. I am somewhat comforted by the fact that it really is supposed to only kills things that get sprayed. so insects visiting later should be ok. it is so crispy and dry right now that there are very few insects in the yard. no food, cover, or things to pollinate.
 
paul wheaton
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I seem to remember that for outdoors there was something you could put on the soil ...  some sort of nematode I think.
 
Leah Sattler
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do you figure earthworms would eat flea eggs? I am thinking yes. i wonder if the reason they are so out of control here is because there are no natural predators so I I am going to look into the earthworm and nematode thing.....near the house there isn't enough soil to support a very large earthworm population.
 
                              
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Don't fleas normally lay their eggs on the skin of their host?
 
Jami McBride
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Sorry - I have no information or experience on neem oil.

But, Yes - nematodes are the way to go. 

However they need slight dampness to live and multiply (which is what you want) - So spring time is really the time to buy and start your ranching of these small guys.  Think composting beneficial bacterial - moist and warm, this is what these guys need too.  To add them during the summer - apply following the directions and keep their area moist.  For example add 'em to a pile of leaves, keep moist and move the leaves into the dog run and sprinkle now and then.  The leaves will help a lot to hold in the little bit of moisture these guys need to establish themselves.

Also there are different types of nematodes, some not beneficial.  So you want to get the good ones advertised for this purpose - easily done they sell them at feed stores, home improvement stores, even Fred Meryers!  Or buy on-line at Amazon.com

DE is easily purchased at Amazon.com, diatomaceous earth Food Grade 50 Lb $33.00
Your total is over $25 so poof!  No Shipping!  Yiiippppeeee!

And nematodes too from Amazon.com (delivered to your door!)
7 Million Live Beneficial Nematodes-Kills over 230 Bugs  $19.99

No, I do not work for Amazon...

~Jami
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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CurrentWave:

Apparently not!

You could have provided a link in such a way that Amazon would offer benefits for those that click through and end up buying.  It's very easy to set up such an arrangement, but I'm kinda glad you didn't.

It's becoming a bit of a problem in larger online fora...people submit or find entertaining reviews and then link through, hoping to make big money if the link gets a lot of attention.
 
Jami McBride
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Yes, I know - I have an Amazon biz account. 

And it would be okay for me to 'earn the points' for a click-through IF
I had Paul's permission AND let everyone know straight out what I was doing....

But I give info/links to help others and not to make a buck.  Nickels and dimes are not going to make me the kind of rich I value.  I'm rich enough all ready ♥

~Jami
 
paul wheaton
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Leah Sattler wrote:
do you figure earthworms would eat flea eggs?


I would think earthworms would not intentionally eat flea eggs.  Earthworms are keen on leaves and dried grass and compost.


 
paul wheaton
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alyssa wrote:
Don't fleas normally lay their eggs on the skin of their host?


Yes, but the idea is that the eggs roll off of the host to get scattered everywhere.

 
paul wheaton
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If somebody had their own amazon link, that's fine. 

Here is my amazon income line for the nematodes:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00025MMUO/rs12-20

This site currently runs in the red and the amazon links help a tiny bit.  All that has to be done is to change "B00025MMUO" to be whatever the product "ASIN" is.  Easy peasy. 



 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Getting back to the neem oil, I'd heard it's a mosquito (insect?) repellent, in addition to its healing properties.

I have a lotion with neem oil in it. At the rocket stove workshop just a couple weekends ago, we were outside playing with fire late into the evening. On the way to the workshop, I had put my neem oil lotion on my hands and arms--no place else.

That night as I climbed into bed, I discovered that my feet - no lotion and only in Teva sandals - were absolutely covered in mosquito bites! When I mean covered, I mean at least one in every square inch of skin--on every toe, too! And I had no bites at all on my upper body.

I'm thinking that my blood was obviously mighty tasty to the mosquitoes that night.  And that the neem oil kept them away from part of me! 

(It could be that my hands and arms were more active than my feet, and I swatted away the mosquitoes near them, but I don't think that explains all of it.)

If the neem oil is that powerfully repellent to mosquitoes, is it also largely a repellent to fleas, too?
 
Leah Sattler
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mosquitos have a particular attraction to feet because of the natural smell, so that is probaby why they went after them. I made my dh spray the yard with it at a time when I wouldn't have to be out there for a while because it is an abortifaciant. I would use it on my dogs but not any significant quantity on myself. most products like that contain so little it is just fluff, only marketing but still...... I don't want to be smearing "birth control oil" all over my body........well.....not right now anyway
http://www.sisterzeus.com/neem.html
 
Joellen Anderson
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We use neem oil directly on our animals when they first come in to kill fleas (usually they have massive infestations when they come off the road). Lather them up in oil, let it sit for 10 or 12 hours, then come them out and bathe them. Works like a charm!

I never thought about spraying it though...not a bad idea! Wouldn't want to spray it on bedding though, I think it would get messy really quick.
 
kevin stewart
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I worked on a hot dusty caribbean island last year.
Lots of neem trees.
I tried extracting neem oil (seeds in a blender and soaking in cold water overnight)
No luck.

So i put neem leaves in a blender with water
And used the water for bathing. I usually left the shower with bits of green still attached to me but was very pleased with the result.

I convinced a friend to wash her dogs with neem water and both fleas and tics begone!
She also tossed the leftover bath water on to dirt spots the dogs liked to lie on.

She did not continue the neem treatment though( only when i went to the trouble of bringing it to her).

Sadly i cant grow neem in northeast arizona.

 
Joellen Anderson
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Woah, Kevin! I don't know why I never thought of using the tea! We would sometimes mix it in the food as a natural antibiotic but this is a great idea! Wouldn't cause the same mess either

Thanks!
 
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