• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

What edibles can I grow under my Plum Tree?  RSS feed

 
Steve Flanagan
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What edibles can I grow under my Plum Tree?
 
Carla Resnick
Posts: 4
Location: Northern California
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a healthy crop of collards under my plum tree.
 
Steve Flanagan
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Carla Resnick wrote:I have a healthy crop of collards under my plum tree.


I will try this.

Any other suggestions?
 
Carla Resnick
Posts: 4
Location: Northern California
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well, I have chickens under the tree too, so the collards grow up out of beak's reach and they keep the base pretty weed-free.
The plum is rather near to some raspberries, but they are not exactly under the tree. I have quite a bit of catnip too, which is medicinal (kills a cold) and not bothered by the chickens.
So I imaging you could try some oregano or thyme, or other herbs. I also like to sow bell beans and daikon just all over, so those things are there too. Bell beans are mostly for the green matter - you could grow the culinary fava type instead, the daikon is a good soil builder, mineral accumulator, and also edible (tops and roots). I let most of them go to seed and then rot.
I always grow some sort of winter squash which will reach out in many directions, and sometimes the stems make their way under the plum. You could plant squash at the base of the plum in the spring, and it would create a nice shade for the base.
 
Steve Flanagan
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks. That gives me some good ideas!
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I have blackcurrant bushes, an enormous rhubarb plant and a host of self-seeded things including chard, walking onions (awesome), parsley, random lettucy stuff...
 
Kris Minto
Posts: 137
Location: Ottawa, Canada -- Zone 4b/5a
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Depending on your soil, sun light and the size of the plum tree, you could grow pretty much any edible you would like.
 
Steve Flanagan
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
8
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Leila Rich wrote:
I have blackcurrant bushes, an enormous rhubarb plant and a host of self-seeded things including chard, walking onions (awesome), parsley, random lettucy stuff...


Is walking onion the same as Egyptian onion? I planted some egyptian onion this past year. It has not done much yet.
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Steve Flanagan wrote: Is walking onion the same as Egyptian onion? I planted some egyptian onion this past year. It has not done much yet


That's the one, and unless something really unusual's going on, yours should do plenty, soon enough
 
Steve Flanagan
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Leila Rich wrote:
Steve Flanagan wrote: Is walking onion the same as Egyptian onion? I planted some egyptian onion this past year. It has not done much yet


That's the one, and unless something really unusual's going on, yours should do plenty, soon enough


That's exciting!
 
Abe Connally
Posts: 1502
Location: Chihuahua Desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've had a lot of success with winter squash and beans around our plums.
 
I promise I will be the best, most loyal friend ever! All for this tiny ad:
Video of all the permaculture design course and appropriate technology course (about 177 hours)
https://permies.com/wiki/65386/paul-wheaton/digital-market/Video-PDC-ATC-hours-HD
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!