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Fast growing vines with edible uses

 
Steve Flanagan
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Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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I'm looking for some fast growing vines for usda zone 9a, in california. I want them to provide food, be it flowers, fruits, or leaves. I would prefer that they be perennial, but i will settle for annuals.
I want these vines to grow up and cover some fencing I will be putting up.

Any Ideas?
 
osker brown
Posts: 146
Location: Southern Appalachia
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I'm on the east coast, zone 6ish, and passionflower would fit your description (Passiflora incarnata). It's fast growing, evergreen, with edible fruit and medicinal flowers/leaves/stems, it supposedly only lives for 5-7 years but it's easy to propagate by seed or cuttings. There's probably a couple other passionfruit species that would grow for you in zone 9.
 
Steve Flanagan
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Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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Thank you for the reply.
I really like the passiflora genus. Can different species pollinate each other?
 
Joanne Gross
Posts: 17
Location: Eugene, OR, USDA zone 8b
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Kiwis are nice if you have strong, taller fencing. You need a male and a female plant for pollination. Or grapes. Or mashua.
 
chrissy bauman
Posts: 131
Location: Sunset Zone 27, Florida
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passionflowers for the win. they are hard to get rid of sometimes too. i wrote a huge thing about them on my blog here...with pictures.

http://oldescrubland.blogspot.com/2012/08/maypop-passionflower.html

i live in zone 8b in florida. we have a hardy "arctic" kiwi, it doesn't look good, not sure if they can't handle the heat or wind or what. regular kiwi will probably do fine where you are, especially if they are planted in a spot that is out of any cold winter winds.

here in the southeast we have a variety of grape called Muscadine that can handle the heat. Being as how your CA is known for its grapes...

have you considered hops as a seasonal annual? even if you don't drink beer, no doubt you know someone that does!

what about climbing roses? the leaves are edible to a lot of livestock, like my rabbits, and have the added benefit of keeping out trespassers and the rose hip is a well known source of vitamins. plus bees, birds, etc.
 
chrissy bauman
Posts: 131
Location: Sunset Zone 27, Florida
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also, in general, different species of anything can't cross pollinate. the organisms have different genetics, thats why they are called different species. now hybrids, on the other hand, can interbreed and pollinate. thats probably what you meant. the only passionflowers that can pollinate the purple flowered passion fruits are the other purple flowered ones. but i do believe many of the other beautiful flowering vines in the passiflora family have edible fruit. they just may not be worth the trouble with all those seeds. passion fruit have been cultivated for a long, long time in tropical areas, the other vines not so much. but the flowers are pretty great
 
Joanne Gross
Posts: 17
Location: Eugene, OR, USDA zone 8b
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Hops are great, but be prepared for very vigorous 20+ foot vines every year if you plant them. When we planted ours, we were not prepared. We planted them on one side of our house and kept building bigger and bigger trellises each year after the herbaceous vines had died back. Each year they made a mockery of our previous year's trellising attempts, quickly overtaking the trellis and then going on to try to choke out all neighboring plants and try to pull the gutters off our roof, until we finally just tied hops twine from the top of a 10' trellis to the top of our chimney and let them grow up that. It was just enough for them, though we still have to keep an eye on them as they grow and cut back any vines that work their way behind and around the gutters. The fresh hops do make fantastic beer, the dense vines absorb heat and hold humidity on the south-facing fence they grow up, making the area in and around them much more hospitable to other plants and beneficial organisms, and I also use the cones in soaps, teas, bath water, and to make hops pillows. They are well worth growing if you have the space for them!
 
Nicole Castle
Posts: 151
Location: Madison, AL
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Chayote squash (aka merletons). You'll see these growing on fences in So Cal from time to time. It's a summer squash-like mild vegetable. Some people intensely dislike it from some reason -- you can buy one at many grocery stores to see if you like it before growing it.

Most people eat the fruiting body but all parts of the plant can be eaten.
 
Steve Flanagan
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Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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I like Chayote Squash. I've only had the fruits.
 
Robert Ray
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Location: Cascades of Oregon
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Mexican sour gherkins and groundnuts might work for you.
 
Steve Flanagan
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Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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Both sound really good. I would like to hear some feedback from those that have grown either, especially groundnuts.
 
Alex Ames
Posts: 393
Location: Georgia
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Malabar Spinach could contribute. It likes heat and it grows quickly. It dies in the cold but
it is a strong re-seeder. It is not yummy but it is edible.
 
Steve Flanagan
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Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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Alex Ames wrote:Malabar Spinach could contribute. It likes heat and it grows quickly. It dies in the cold but
it is a strong re-seeder. It is not yummy but it is edible.


What is the flavor like? I definitely would like heat tolerant greens. The summers here are just to hot and dry for traditional greens like lettuce, spinach, and arugula.
 
Alex Ames
Posts: 393
Location: Georgia
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Steve Flanagan wrote:
Alex Ames wrote:Malabar Spinach could contribute. It likes heat and it grows quickly. It dies in the cold but
it is a strong re-seeder. It is not yummy but it is edible.


What is the flavor like? I definitely would like heat tolerant greens. The summers here are just to hot and dry for traditional greens like lettuce, spinach, and arugula.


It's taste is fairly neutral, so it has it's uses. I say try it and see what you think. There are at least 2 different varieties I understand.
The one I am growing has purple vines. It is a good strong growing plant and as I mentioned it re-seeds.
 
Steve Flanagan
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Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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Alex Ames wrote:
Steve Flanagan wrote:
Alex Ames wrote:Malabar Spinach could contribute. It likes heat and it grows quickly. It dies in the cold but
it is a strong re-seeder. It is not yummy but it is edible.


What is the flavor like? I definitely would like heat tolerant greens. The summers here are just to hot and dry for traditional greens like lettuce, spinach, and arugula.


It's taste is fairly neutral, so it has it's uses. I say try it and see what you think. There are at least 2 different varieties I understand.
The one I am growing has purple vines. It is a good strong growing plant and as I mentioned it re-seeds.


I'll give it a shot next year. Thanks for the suggestion.
 
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