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nitrogen?

 
Posts: 32
Location: Alberta Canada 3b I think....
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hey, as we all know, vc is high in all kinds of groovy things for plants. What I am wondering is whether any of you have taken a more scientific approach at all to this in that you only feed certain foods to your worms in order to get certain values in your verm. I have plans of using my vc in the summer in my sheet mulched beds (some people are calling it a lasagne garden). I am hoping that someone here knows what I should feed more of to increase the amount of nitrogen in my verm. My sheet beds were only made this fall, before the snow fell. In the spring, I hope to boost the process with something high in nitrogen since that is what is often short in the composting process. Any suggestions?
 
Posts: 236
Location: SE Wisconsin, USA zone 5b
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Materials that are high in Nitrogen tend to smell when they break down, they tend to be moist, they are things that don't burn easliy and often are things that critters will eat. Green vegetable matter, fruit, coffee grounds, manure for some examples.

Your best bet for sheet mulching is to layer high nitrogen materials with high Carbon materials. Things that are high in carbon tend to burn, critters generally don't want to eat them. Cardboard, wood, paper, dried grass and leaves are some examples.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1602
Location: northern California
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Don't know much about worms, but I know that one of the best nitrogen boosts for soil, compost, and topdressing most kinds of plants is fresh urine. Use straight as a compost booster or pre-planting, and dilute one to four or five in water for use around growing plants. I would try this dilution on the worms....perhaps on a small experimental bin of them, and see what happens.....
 
Posts: 258
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Comfrey leaves!

When you do your sheet mulching, include a layer of comfrey leaves... Or buckwheat greens, or similar
 
James Barr
Posts: 32
Location: Alberta Canada 3b I think....
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I have heard that coffee grounds are great for nitrogen. Have any of you tried using coffee grounds in your mulches? my wife and I drink a lot of coffee, so the grounds are being put into my vermicompost, but what about straight into my garden?
 
Posts: 58
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if you feed your worms cardboard and eggshells, you will get a 1-0-0 vermicompost with calcium in it, similar to wriggle worm brand. I add kelp meal, neem meal, and alfalfa meals to my worm bin, a sprinkle with each feeding
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