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Dehydrating with “ the sunny windshield technique ”

 
pioneer
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Location: Val d'Espoir, Quebec, Canada, zone3a at the bottom of a valley
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Hello there ! Since i did not find a post on the dehydrating method under a windshield, wich is mentionned in BB sand badge  Food dehydratation, i make one here !

I tried it and it's a success. Just not to forget to let at least a crack in the windows, of full open. When possible, i turn my car 2-3 times during the day to follow the sun, if not i tried to place food mostly south facing. I didn't have metal pan, so i used aluminium tart tins found in the recycled bins. Best result with only 1 level of food and if possible to turn of shake it a little. In 3-4 days the fruits were very dry !


https://www.littleecofootprints.com/2011/02/drying-dehydrating-food-fruit-car.html
https://thetanglednest.com/2009/08/drying-food-in-car/

20220725_080000.jpg
Strawberry dehydrating full sun
Strawberry dehydrating full sun
 
pollinator
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I tried this at the very end of last summer and found that I couldn't get the conditions steady enough. After four days, my fruit was dry and leathery, but also molding and I had to compost it. For the BB you mentioned, I ended up using a solar stove without all the effort to concentrate the heat. I have no doubt it can be made to work, but I wasn't getting enough sun.
 
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I have posted somewhere here on the forum that I have used that method with great success, for tomatoes.

The thing about why it worked for me is it is really hot in Texas so things dehydrate fast.

It also helps to keep turning over the item you are dehydrating often.
 
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