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Timber questions?

 
Joseph Fields
Posts: 170
Location: Berea, Kentucky
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There is a large tract of forest for sale that I would love to buy in my area. At the price it is listed, I am assuming it has been logged recently. Does anyone have any resources for forest land revenue stream time tables? The property is in Eastern Ky, and has lots of texture from looking at the area in google earth. The purchase will be a significant financial burden to me in my current income stream, however with our current state of affairs I feel It's a safe investment.
 
Duncan Hamra
Posts: 8
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What exactly do you mean by "forest land revenue stream time tables"? And what do you hope to get out of the land?
 
Fred Morgan
steward
Posts: 979
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
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I would suggest you go an ask this question at http://www.forestryforum.com/ There are many forestry engineers there who can help you and give you an idea. Eventually you would want to have someone walk the property.

Don't assume it has been logged due to the price. Strange as it might seem, usually the presence of woods doesn't increase the value of land in the USA, since farm land is considered more valuable.
 
Joseph Fields
Posts: 170
Location: Berea, Kentucky
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Duncan Hamra wrote:What exactly do you mean by "forest land revenue stream time tables"? And what do you hope to get out of the land?

I'm looking for something like; an acre will yield x board foot in x about of time. At current rates would be y. I know there are a lot of factors. I will retire in 19 years and I know there is no way I will be able to pay for the land into retirement wit out a yield to pay for the last 11 years of the loan.
 
Fred Morgan
steward
Posts: 979
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
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You pretty much have to start with what exists in the north to have a 19 year plan, so you start with inventory.
 
James Flour
Posts: 14
Location: PNW
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Basically Joseph, you are going to want to know what your "site index" is, that is a combination of soil type, rainfall patterns and hydrography for the site, what sun exposure you have (North slopes do better for some trees, south for others depending on the slope) and the type of trees you are planning to raise. There is also the question of soil nutrition, out here the hills have low Phosphorous, so P is (one) of the limiting factors.

You would probably want to look it over to see if you like it - no sense buying a tract of land if you just have bad vibes over it - and go talk to the small woodlands organization in your area, or one of the colleges with a silvaculture program. Take a notebook. If there are trees on it to start with you want to have someone cruise it to see what your stocking is, and what sort of work you will have to do to put it into production. If you aren't used to looking at seedlings you can miss the trees for the brush. Again, you may have trees that are diseased or have conk and you will need to clear them out. Around here, if you find you have firs with laminated root rot (for example), you pretty much have to plant something else for the next couple of 20 year rotations in that pocket.

What you get out of a site is a combination of the site index, which tells you what grows well, if anything, and what species you put in. Also the market is a big factor nowadays: there may be an oversupply of lumber and logs come time to harvest, they may shut the national forests down again and restrict overall supply, they might make cob and balehouses mandatory and you can only sell dimension lumber to the Koreans. I'm not saying that you shouldn't do it, I think it is a wonderful idea, but you may want to consider other benefits besides the money in -> money out, cause you may not be able to depend on the place to earn your mortgage payments, especially at first.

On the other hand, Mark Twain said, "Buy land, they've stopped making it", and our place is truly a balm to the soul, when I'm not clearing blackberries or plugging the holes the beavers dig in the dam...

Let me know what you decide to do, like buying a house, buying land is a fantastically wonderful spectator sport.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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The question is.
On average how much money will I make if they harvest 1 acre of forest. $2500
How long do I have to wait for each harvest. 10-50years
If I harvest every 10yrs (1acre every year with 10acres), what the best tree to plant.
What else could I get from the forest other than wood, honey from bee, rental for deer hunters, nuts from trees. coppice firewood vs lumber.
What if I plant willow/etc that grow 45ft in 5 years, how cheap is that wood.
Could I just sell my forest as sawdust(mushroom/manufactured lumber) would I still make good money.
 
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