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Are there any new ways of food preservation?  RSS feed

 
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Hi all this m first post.
I've canned and frozen even dried food since childhood.

My question is, Are there any new ways of food preservation?
Thanks
Eldon Howe
 
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Hi, Eldon, I don't know any new methods of food preservation but some have mentioned freeze dried as an option and lacto-fermentation is another (very historic) method of extending the life of food. Maybe someone else can answer your question...I would be interested also.
 
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There is a newer form of preservation called "Pascalization".
The idea is that you subject your materials (generally sealed in mylar or the like) to extremely high pressures that rupture the cell walls of the bacteria.
It is supposed to be good for sea food, eggs and such...I've only seen one article on it, and that was a fairly light one. I don't know if there is any way to do it at home, the pressures needed are immense.

Of course you can get fruit that has been "bleached", that is treated with Sulfur Dioxide, but that is extremely old tech.
 
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Sous vide?

lit. Under Vacuum

Seems to be a very expensive way of slow cooking meat from what I can gather but as the food is heated up to 55C and is vacuum packed it seems to have some preservation built in.

Requires lots of equipment and careful timing, may destroy bacteria but may leave the toxins intact.

I stick to making jam.
 
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