• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Need food ideas to help me gain weight  RSS feed

 
Nathan Paris
Posts: 80
Location: http://projectecogrid.com/
tiny house transportation woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So Im a pretty small guy to begin with, then you throw on top of that all manual labor that I've been doing here recently, I've started to loose weight. I was able to feel bones that Ive never felt before lol, thats how I know its bad. They guys I work with say to go get that protein stuff from GNC but I dont want to pump my body full of that junk! What could I start eating that will be healthy for me, taste good, and help me gain weight?

I appreciate your help!
 
Julia Winter
steward
Posts: 2116
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
190
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ice cream! Ice cream with melted peanut butter on top. Delicious, nutritious and pretty likely to help you put on weight. Honestly, I think you could eat whatever you enjoy. Fat is very calorie dense, but also very filling. Carbohydrates seem to put weight on most people. Protein comes in many delicious forms, including meat, dairy, eggs and legumes. I recommend cooking the eggs, or at least the egg whites (I like my yolks runny) but of course Rocky ate raw eggs when he was bulking up in the original movie. (Don't eat raw eggs from factory farms!!)

Don't buy processed protein products. Spend your money on the best food you can find, and enjoy!
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sounds like what happens when you start working on a farm, I didn't loose much weight because I was always pretty lightweight but I've gained muscle greatly. the farm is like It's own gym, but better than any gym out there. Funny thing Is I eat a lot of food, maybe twice as much as the average person. Most of it food I grew or someone I know grew it.

What rich foods do you eat now?
 
Adam Poddepie
Posts: 68
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Peanut butter, almonds, eggs, beans, and meat. Take your pick, just pack it on! Anything you can cook in or with oil will also increase your caloric intake.

A word of caution, however: beware of cholesterol. With your increased diet, many things you will tend to eat will have plenty of cholesterol. Balance this out with something higher in fiber like oatmeal.

Oh! I almost forgot! Lots of carbs! Preferably complex, but if you're in a hurry anything will do. Pasta, bread, take your pick. If you're feeling fancy, naan and hummus can really pack a punch! Best of luck! (and drink lots of water!)
 
Jocelyn Campbell
master steward
Posts: 4257
Location: Missoula, MT
410
books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur toxin-ectomy
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Adam Poddepie wrote:
Oh! I almost forgot! Lots of carbs! Preferably complex, but if you're in a hurry anything will do. Pasta, bread, take your pick. If you're feeling fancy, naan and hummus can really pack a punch! Best of luck! (and drink lots of water!)


I agree with Julia and Adam that adding carbohydrates is the way to go. Starchy carbs are how I gained too much weight. I have a weakness for them - especially potato chips (I know). When I reduce my starchy carbs I lose weight, even without increasing my exercise.

Some people continue to lose weight, and lower their cholesterol, on high fat diets (I have, though I have more weight to lose still), so the high fat or rich foods recommended may or may not work for you.

Just wanna point out one more thing: there are carbs, carbs and carbs.

Complex carbs can be green or most any garden veggies, whole grains, legumes or root veggies - it's a broad definition. The opposite are simple carbs: sugars, white/refined flours or alcohol. Then there are grains that are fermented or not. (Sheesh, we get complicated about food!)

When I recommend adding starchy carbs, I'm implying whole foods and what I consider to be healthy ones - root vegetables (potatoes! though probably not deep fried ) or winter squashes, whole (fermented?) grains, soaked legumes.

Good luck!
 
wayne stephen
steward
Posts: 1793
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
104
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you are eating enough good food , I would not worry about it. Everyone has a natural weight we are genetically inclined to. I remember spending much of my youth trying to gain weight by eating alot. Could not gain no matter what. ( I assume you are younger than me ). Then when I hit my 30's all hell broke loose around my waist line. I can certainly gain , hard to lose , and I still have those old bad eating habits. I yearn for the days when freinds called me "Skeletor" and not "Bubba".
 
laura sharpe
Posts: 244
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You are gaining muscle mass as you lose weight...

You need all calories for sure but protein should be high on your need to eats. I know there are many people out there more qualified to help in this than I am, i would suggest perhaps looking for another websight focused more on this issue. I do know that when I was losing weight when pregnant with my last one, adding nuts to my diet fixed it all up and they were delicious so

when they say peanut butter...i say yes

my suggestion really would be to make or buy some sort of granola or trail mix which you can carry with you. I would look for (or make) one with plenty of nuts and some dried fruits. Keep some with you even as you work. Nibble a bit whenever you can or feel like it. If you have problems with dirty hands, make it into a bar and cut small squares so you can just slip one out of the container straight into your mouth.
 
Morgan Morrigan
Posts: 1400
Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
would also buy a small bottle of "Elete" at a runner or hiking shop.

you are getting calories, but not converting them to muscle fast enough, it could be a calcium/magnesium problem.
soaking your feet in epsom salts not only soothes the bones, but will leach out bad stuff and stink, and your body will uptake what magnesium it needs without running it thru your stomach, which can be smoothie inducing.


Adding electrolytes will really help you to burn the fuel more efficiently, and use water more efficiently too.
They say you drink 40% less water, yet stay 60% better hydrated. Part marketing hype, but the firefighters are using it, and having great success for stamina and energy.
May be in part cuz you are peeing less , but you will feel it or not within a few days.


 
David Hartley
Posts: 258
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A good generic rule: never eat protein without fat and never eat carbs without protein

For calorie dense foods that give lasting energy and fortify the body, eat roots and tubers: such as carrots, beets, potatoes, and all the other wonders found within the earth.

Also consider the psuedo-grains, such as buckwheat; as well as tree nuts.


And don't forget: egg yolks are nature's multi-vitamin!
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1359
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If all that you are losing is fat and not muscle, be glad about that even if it makes you look "uglier" you will live with less health problems and most likely longer.
Now if you are in fact losing muscle, then that means that you need to increase you calorie intake.
For that I would recommend a high protein diet so that you can replace the lost muscle.
I would also include more complex carbs, such as beans and maybe some root/tubers.
Drink lost of water to keep you hydrated even in the winter and at least a 1/2lbs of vegetables a day, mineral/vitamins to build new cells.
Dont forget to give yourself a day, preferable on the weekend, where you go all out eating as much junk food as your gut can hold.
It will let you pack on the pound while still being healthy.

If your belly is getting bigger then you most likely have worms/etc
 
Melba Corbett
Posts: 164
Location: North Carolina
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lots of good advice on this forum already. The body can only produce one digestive enzyme at a time, so starchy foods such as carbs should never be mixed with concentrated proteins like meat, milk, eggs. Mix them with beans, which are protein and carbs, they digest differently. Never eat meat until one hour after dairy, or dairy four hours after meat and it will digest better. I know, I know, we all fudge on this, with meat sandwiches with bread and such, but we pay for it with arthritis, impaired liver function, indigestion, etc.

Make sure you don't have parasites. I always do a parasite cleanse twice a year whether I have symptoms or not, after all, I'm shoveling manure out of barns, and handling dirt and breathing the dust off compost, etc. I use a green hull tincture of black walnut, artemesia absinthe and artemesia annua and garlic. Usually 3 times a day for two weeks gets rid of most things in the gut, but not tapeworm. Tapeworm requires something like squash seed or pumpkin seed daily for about two months, although the black walnut does help.

There is a lot of difference in fats/oils. Generally the oils that are liquid at above 75 degrees will help dissolve the saturated fat in the body. Too much saturated fat is not good for the arteries, but the body can deal with some if you get the good oils too. Even some of the greens have omega 3.

Put more emphasize on nuts, grains, puddings and make sure you eat a rich, wholesome snack before bedtime and then again as soon as you get up and feel hungry. Someone suggested keeping snacks with you while working and that is an excellent idea. You are burning a lot of calories, try to provide for the extra by eating more.
Get quality rest when you can, and get enough of it. Never stand when you can sit, never sit when you can lie down, it conserves calories. Try to learn to work with less movement, in the way you stand or walk while working, or toss compost or whatever you are doing. Find ways to do it with less effort.
 
David Hartley
Posts: 258
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
".....There is a lot of difference in fats/oils. Generally the oils that are liquid at above 75 degrees will help dissolve the saturated fat in the body. Too much saturated fat is not good for the arteries, but the body can deal with some if you get the good oils too....."


Don't mean to start an argument; but I have not found any science to back this statement... In fact; closer to the opposite.
 
Fred Morgan
steward
Posts: 979
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When our oxen or horses are working hard, we add feed (think grain) to their food. Normally they do just fine on our grasses. But you have to have a calories when you are really active.

I used to commute with a bike, I had to eat peanut butter sandwiches to maintain weight, when I am only doing office work, the mere sight of one I think would make me gain weight.
 
Nick Simcheck
Posts: 57
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
David Hartley wrote:".....There is a lot of difference in fats/oils. Generally the oils that are liquid at above 75 degrees will help dissolve the saturated fat in the body. Too much saturated fat is not good for the arteries, but the body can deal with some if you get the good oils too....."


Don't mean to start an argument; but I have not found any science to back this statement... In fact; closer to the opposite.



If I'm not mistaken what Melba was trying to say is that a lot of "good" oils are liquid at or above room temperature, which I wouldn't argue on the basis of the variety that meet that criteria... But some "good oils" are solid at room temperature but again so are hydrogenated oils, and plenty of "good" oils maintain a certain viscosity down to freezing.

So I wouldn't say it's necessarily one way or the other.
 
Nick Simcheck
Posts: 57
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Double post.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!