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fungus gnats

 
laura sharpe
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My worm bin has fungus gnats, truthfully they are most annoying as they fly to most parts of the house looking for new places to lay eggs.

I am trying to figure out what this product is before i get it, i am looking for organic solution which will not hurt the worms....
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002KQJQQQ/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&smid=A2S412YGB6IYQK

i found two others
nematodes: http://www.amazon.com/Pyes-Scanmask-Million-Beneficial-Nematodes/dp/B000MRD5JO/ref=sr_1_6?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1355419247&sr=1-6&keywords=fungus+gnat+control

http://www.amazon.com/Valent-Gnatrol-WDG-60-grams/dp/B003E7BGTU/ref=sr_1_3?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1355419246&sr=1-3&keywords=fungus+gnat+control
 
Bob Dobbs
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Just get some of those mosquito dunks and put in it, or anything really that contains bacillus thuregenesis israelensis, or the one that kills mosquitoes. Won't harm the worms a bit and will kill the fungus gnats dead.
 
Marc Troyka
pollinator
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Location: East Central GA, Ultisol, Zone 8, Humid
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http://www.everwoodfarm.biz/home/benificial-insects-by-pest-catagory/fungus-gnat-and-scarid-fly

They have both nematodes and predatory mites, neither of which will hurt worms, but I'm not really sure how long they'll last in a worm bin, either. I think a better solution might be to get some screen and cover the holes they use to get in and out in the first place.
 
John Polk
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Yeah. Screening sounds more practical.
The minimum quantity at Everwood is sufficient for about an acre...a little overkill for a worm bin.

 
Nancy Sinclaire
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An old sheer curtain draped over the bin works to keep them in. No need to close at the bottom because they do not seem to fly under. For the fruitflys in the house get a nice bottle of red wine. Put an inch into a glass and stir in a single drop of dish washing liquid. Put this on top of a coffee can on the kitchen counter. Fruitflys seem attracted to the top edges of things. Pour a second glass for yourself. Count the fruitflys that land in it while drinking. Next night hold the first glass up to the light and look from the bottom up into the light. Count the flies. Satisfaction. No need to replace it, just keep on using. Add water if needed to maintain level. Drink another glass of wine. This evening there should be far less fruit flies.

Oh, I see now you said fungus flies. Fruitflies are nice guys compared to fungus flies. Maybe search for standing water such as the refrigerator drip tray. Maybe pour a torrent of hot water down sink, tub, floor traps. Maybe diatomaceous earth. Yellow sticky boards. Stop feeding and watering the bin. Add dry bedding over the top. Flip the bin top to bottom, maybe even into a second bin thus covering the old top completely.
 
laura sharpe
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Nancy Sinclaire wrote:An old sheer curtain draped over the bin works to keep them in. No need to close at the bottom because they do not seem to fly under. For the fruitflys in the house get a nice bottle of red wine. Put an inch into a glass and stir in a single drop of dish washing liquid. Put this on top of a coffee can on the kitchen counter. Fruitflys seem attracted to the top edges of things. Pour a second glass for yourself. Count the fruitflys that land in it while drinking. Next night hold the first glass up to the light and look from the bottom up into the light. Count the flies. Satisfaction. No need to replace it, just keep on using. Add water if needed to maintain level. Drink another glass of wine. This evening there should be far less fruit flies.

Oh, I see now you said fungus flies. Fruitflies are nice guys compared to fungus flies. Maybe search for standing water such as the refrigerator drip tray. Maybe pour a torrent of hot water down sink, tub, floor traps. Maybe diatomaceous earth. Yellow sticky boards. Stop feeding and watering the bin. Add dry bedding over the top. Flip the bin top to bottom, maybe even into a second bin thus covering the old top completely.


perhaps i can work on getting fruit flies tooo
 
David Hartley
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Some vinegared juice or wine works well for attracting fungus gnats (fashion yourself a couple of traps)... Carnivorous plants, such as sundews, work well, too...

I would suggest keeping your worm bin a bit drier... Especially at the top surface.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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too late for screens, the larvae are in the soil..you need to kill the larvae, they will spread to other plants in the house
 
Bob Dobbs
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I'm telling ya, I kill these guys organically on a professional basis. The BT for mosquitoes is the stuff you need, it is OMRI certified and won't hurt the worms a bit. I like to get the pure stuff myself since I'm worried about fillers being nasty more than a specific bacterium. The stuff kills the larvae specifically, the only other possible thing this bacteria would infect would be mosquito larvae... And, to an extent (as one removes and adds media it becomes less true), once you treat with the BT, it persists in the soil in my experience, possibly due to the bacteria multiplying in the larvae? That is the only easy, good, quick kill for fungus gnats I know of.

References:
http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7448.html
 
laura sharpe
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although all good suggestions, i am ordering the bt now.

I do have two bowls of cider vinegar in there, i am hoping to get some of the adults just because i hate them .

I will put some of the compost from already finished bins into the top bin to keep the bt in the bins to kill off any reinfestation. Luckily, I killed off all houseplants back in 2001. The worm poo is for the outside stuff
 
Helen Gilson
Posts: 38
Location: Zone 6 Ohio but interested in Zone 6 Southwest
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The best thing is the red wine vinegar in a bowl with plastic wrap tightly stretched over the top, poke a few toothpick size holes in the plastic. They will self eliminate quickly this way.

Also put a sheet of newspaper loose resting over the top of the bin. Flies don't like going past paper, *shrugs* don't know why but it works. Part of why produce suppliers ship bananas with a sheet of paper over them.
 
julian kirby
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5 words. Neem Seed Meal, Diatomaceous Earth.
 
Mateo Chester
Posts: 148
Location: Zone 4b
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Let your soil bin go through a couple dry cycles... Fungus gnats prefer it moist. I find they thrive best when "things" are out of balance.. does your bin smell funky? I find they are also attracted to more anaerobic conditions. I have had them in pots that were too moist. You could also throw a couple yellow stickies under there to try and capture the adult fliers..

To emphasize JK's point: I have permanently eradicated fungus gnats using a neem cake/seed meal top dress in effected areas. Amongst many, many other things, Neem Cake will act as an anti-feedant and will contain anti-fungal properties as well. A little will go a long way, though it can be difficult to source. And unless you're growing neem trees, it might not be the most sustainable resource for your methods... Anyways, if it's something you're interested in, let me tell you, worms LOVE neem. It will enrich your vermicompost with a reliable source Nitrogen, a large number of beneficial compounds and good organic matter. It will also handle all stages of pest life. And this doesn't just go for fungus gnats. Many other pests are adversely affected by neem.

If I were to use DE, I'd probably only use it in conjunction with neem cake or other pest management systems. If I wanted the most multi faceted material possible, wanted to spend as little money as possible, and had to choose between neem cake and DE, the neem would certainly take the cake The versatility of this material is incredible, and if you have limited resources like myself, is one to keep close to home..

And regarding BTI, they are only effective during the larval stages of pests. They won't do anything to the fliers. So, unless you somehow kill every larvae in your bin, the fungus gnat life cycle will unfortunately continue. I don't find it to be nearly as affective as neem cake, and also find it best used (if used) in conjunction with other IPM's.

I am not doubting anyone else's experience, just stating my own.

Hope this helps.
 
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