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butchering wastes/dead bird disposal

 
laura sharpe
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Forgive me for hijacking the chicken forums as this is general critter question I have but....

The biggest question in my mind is what do you do with the wastes from butchering or from die offs, particularly ones where the fear is diseased animals?



 
Jordan Lowery
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the answer is hermetia illucens, or more commonly known as the black soldier fly. With a good colony they will eat like monsters. And in the end you get maggots you can feed to fish, chickens, ducks, etc...
 
laura sharpe
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If you think the birds were diseased, would these larva not pass along the disease? Surely you cannot just leave the carcasses out and let the insects feed on them? I could imagine things getting pretty icky out there if you have a pig or a goat go.
 
Jordan Lowery
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If you do what I said and research them you would have found the answers to your questions. But.....

The larvae "throw up on themselves" as they leave the bin and sterilize themselves. That's not including the pathogen suppression that goes on in the bin. These things come out of the bin clean enough for you to eat let alone a chicken.

Do some research there is so much information on them.
 
Tyler Ludens
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I put all skins with feathers (I skin, not pluck), feet, wings, guts and head in my garden covered with a layer of either sheep poo and old hay or chicken poo and bedding or garden soil or wood chips and with a small cairn of rocks on top to keep the raccoons from digging it up. Seems to compost quite rapidly. I butcher one chicken every week or so, and I'm able to put a new "grave" in a different spot, so I just move the rocks from one place to another. Eventually I might have a more formal way of composting these items, but for now this is easy.

 
Alder Burns
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I'm in thorough agreement about the soldier flies, and I had great luck with them in Georgia. I even fed them humanure and poisonous mushrooms. But I've had trouble with them here in CA...winter too cold, so I have to buy in new ones each spring and there are several months of the year when there are none....including the best tiimes to "do" poultry and other meat. What I did before I knew about soldier flies was direct burial, usually in spots where I knew I'd be planting trees at some point. This is also what I did with humanure for years.
 
Fred Morgan
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Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
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I have always fed offal to my catfish. I know of no disease that will cross between cold blooded and warm blooded. And besides, since I would have no problem eating a catfish I caught in the wild, I can't see why I should mind eating one from my pound where I know what they have been eating.

The idea is to have the waste go through something that won't transmit disease. Chicken to chicken, bad. Chicken to larva to Chicken shouldn't be a problem. Chicken to fish, also not a problem.

And fish to chicken, again, not a problem.
 
Shawn Harper
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Location: Portlandia, Oregon
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If you got a nice size compost pile, just put it in the middle... Should be gone in no time.
 
laura sharpe
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feathers also decompose quickly? Who knew not I, i thought there was be lots of flies and unwanted things
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
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