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!!!!! Jen’s Boot Camp and Allerton Abbey Experience

 
gardener
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I think it would be fair to run the cook stove just for heating at least once a day to simulate having multiple meals in the wofati, as you mentioned in the podcast usually cooking/eating just 1 meal per day. So firing up the cook stove again every day will help simulate that activity, and help minimize additional heat loss to the mass. You could fire it in the morning or evening for the "virtual meal", opposite of the normal time you are already using it. Plus more wood burning might also help with excess humidity?

Having the window treatments up during the night or when away will help limit heat loss, if the tops can be attached to the frames and the bottoms could be rolled up or pinned to the ceiling (says the 6'6" tall guy) when in use during the day.

 
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Joshua Myrvaagnes wrote:

Sometime when you have a few minutes, can any of you describe "pleasant temperature" a little more fully? would an elderly person with poor circulation feel comfortable?  Are you staying bundled up much of the time? are there certain pockets of time when you're cold until you've gotten the fire going?  Thanks!




I can provide a data point/opinion here as I am "over 65" and have been experimenting with the thermostat setting in the house I moved into recently.
At 62F I feel cold normally dressed and need two fleece jackets to feel comfortable. At 68F I am comfortable with one jacket which is my normal winter wear.
I'm not sure how far below 62F I could go and still feel comfortable by adding more clothing layers (long johns etc.).
 
pollinator
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Bits and bobs :


1) heat from the cooker :
Have you tried using stack effect to draw more air across the surface?  
e.g.  Grab a 4-8 ft piece of ducting from the bone pile or wherever and hold it a few inches above the hot burner area ( maybe with a stand or hanging from the ceiling ) .   It should help get the heat away from that area.    If that works more would work better.
A solid maybe.


2) De humidification :

Intentionally leave one of the windows without a cover to get the water condensing their first, then figure out how to deal with _that_ window condensing.  Possibly a metal plate rather than a window.   Possibly placed in a cold sump / the lowest spot in the area so that the cold doesn't drain the rest of the structure of heat, but can be allowed to get cold enough to dehumidify then let the water flow down ( and out? ).


Good luck!
 
gardener
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Tom,

Both of those are cool ideas that we have not tried. Thank you! We will report back any results we get.
 
pollinator
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Tom Rutledge wrote:

Bits and bobs :


1) heat from the cooker :
Have you tried using stack effect to draw more air across the surface?  
e.g.  Grab a 4-8 ft piece of ducting from the bone pile or wherever and hold it a few inches above the hot burner area ( maybe with a stand or hanging from the ceiling ) .   It should help get the heat away from that area.    If that works more would work better.
A solid maybe.



Good luck!



Great idea! I bet a hood of some sort connected to said ducting would work much better; angle out towards corners and try to get some circulation going. Aim those peltier fans accordingly when they shown up..

Adding surface area to the cooktop seems like it might help too. Old computer heatsinks, aluminum angle scraps...?
 
steward
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The rocket cooktop in action!

 
Jennifer Richardson
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Annualized thermal inertia update:

The previous attempts to artificially charge the mass with the rocket cooktop, in which I raised the temperature to 85F and held it there for about an hour, have been insufficient to keep the Abbey decently warm for long afterward (temps inside have recently been in the forties). So we are preparing to attempt to artificially charge the mass for ten days at 85F using a space heater, in order to see how long it takes for the temperature to return to baseline under conditions of normal use. This is only a temporary experiment. Since the mass did not get charged this summer due to construction, we are attempting to cobble together some useful data, but tests this year can be only indicative at best.
 
Jennifer Richardson
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We have been trying out both of the thermoelectric fans, and both seem to help a lot to circulate warm air into the bedroom and lower cell. Thanks, guys! I will try to get a video of them in action next time I'm at the Abbey in daylight (we usually leave before it's light out and return after it's dark).
 
Jennifer Richardson
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We’ve been working on the berm shed a lot lately. It’s almost finished and has turned out to be a pretty cool structure.

(BRK Day 44)
Second-to-last-cell-getting-framed.jpeg
Second to last cell getting framed
Second to last cell getting framed
B6BD6277-8233-43CF-A8E6-447D13633350.jpeg
Berm shed building
Berm shed building
9D5366B6-82B0-4082-9AFF-CA4630F6EED0.jpeg
End of the berm shed
End of the berm shed
 
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