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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!  RSS feed

 
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There is actually a spoon called an egg spoon. They come in different shapes and sizes, as far as I can tell. This is supposedly one



so is this



and these



and this



I honestly don't know much about them, as I've just learnt about them whilst trying to figure out what these spoons are. Maybe the one with a chicken is an egg spoon?
 
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Cosmetic spoons? Used for different powders, oils, and ointments. I have seen some from ancient Egypt that look similar in shape, but with different embellishments.
 
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Ooh, good guesses... Nope.  Ancient Egypt is the closest guess so far.

Egg spoons are used to eat boiled eggs out of an egg cup. egg cups come in all kinds of lovely patterns and styles:


Often in sets, some really elaborate:


If you imagine trying to use a normal teaspoon to eat an egg out of a cup, you see that it's going to be too pointy nosed. That's why egg spoons look the way they do, to get the egg out of the shell at the bottom. The asymmetrical ones in the bottom pic are to dig out the bits at the bottom of the egg.

Those pretty spoons probably went with a classy set like this:


When I was packing my china to move, the only piece I broke was a china egg cup, hit the tile floor, no fixing that pile of shreds...
 
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Spoons for the afterlife then? To be buried with?

I have never in my life spent so much time looking at spoons

 
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That spoon that looks like it has a spoon on both end intrigues me!   This is so much Fun.  I will check out your new thread!

Apostle Spoons Set




COFFEE SPOONS




This is a neat display:




For some creative uses of spoons:

=antique%20spoon%20with%20spoon%20on%20either%20end%7Ctyped].pinterest/spoons
 
Pearl Sutton
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Hahah!
This is being far more entertaining than I expected. Awesome cool spoons Anne! and you know me, I want them ALL!!
Hahah, oh my, my music just started playing Queen "I want it all" Love it when my random playlist relates to what I'm thinking about :D
Judith, ah come on, learning anything brushes up your IQ, keeps dementia away! Call this mental exercise :) Plus hey, pretty spoons!!
You know about the disability energy/coping thing they call spoon theory? Spoon theory
Look at all the pretty spoons you are ending up with!

Not for the afterlife.
 
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After some googling: Roman medicine spoons? The suspense is killing me! And what about Raven's picture, do we have a solution already? This is great fun.
 
Judith Browning
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One more guess and then I really need to put down this tablet and get outdoors

Are these spoons some sort of 'samples' ...like an ancient salesman's set?
I'm getting desperate....

Reposting the original  photo here as it's getting hard to go back and find it.

 
Pearl Sutton
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Philipp Mueller wrote:After some googling: Roman medicine spoons? The suspense is killing me! And what about Raven's picture, do we have a solution already? This is great fun.



Nope! Historically between your two guesses. How's that for a hint? :)
It IS being fun. I'll tell y'all soon, but it really is being entertaining :)
See why the airport security guys asked if they could see? Not an easy answer.

And Raven's things are still bugging me... Haven't had time to think on them much.
ooh! maybe a gauge for telling how deep the wool is on a sheep? Put it down to the skin, see what it tells you about the depth of wool? I think they slid, if I recall correctly... Like a contour gauge for woodwork...
 
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It IS being fun. I'll tell y'all soon, but it really is being entertaining



Oh no, don't tell...someone is bound to guess soon before we all go nuts
 
Pearl Sutton
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Judith Browning wrote:

It IS being fun. I'll tell y'all soon, but it really is being entertaining



Oh no, don't tell...someone is bound to guess soon before we all go nuts



Like I said, I can't find them online.
Keep it up folks!
I came up with another hint if required. I'll let you chew on the historical dating first. And WW1.
 
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Each spoon represents a food or veggie? Cherry spoon, avacado spoon, etc.

Second guess is gutting veggies. Like scraping seeds out of a pumpkin, a cucumber, etc
 
Pearl Sutton
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wayne fajkus wrote:Each spoon represents a food or veggie? Cherry spoon, avacado spoon, etc.

Second guess is gutting veggies. Like scraping seeds out of a pumpkin, a cucumber, etc



Nope. I use them for that. but not what makes them anything other than just normal spoons.
 
Judith Browning
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I've lost track of what's been guessed and I think something to do with medicine has been so I'm guessing if not for measuring they are for warming oils or something over a candle flame?

 
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Spoons for 'coining'?  using spoons instead of coins?
https://www.wisegeek.com/in-traditional-chinese-medicine-what-is-coining.htmhttps://www.wisegeek.com/in-traditional-chinese-medicine-what-is-coining.htm
 
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Going to go way out on a limb here. The spoons look too pretty but it's all I've got. Are they spoons for the billy's (mess kits) used by the Australians & New Zealanders during WW1? Perhaps reserved just for high ranking officers. Tea is important!!!
 
Anne Miller
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WWI Army Cook Spoon Set

I tried searching for antique profession cooking spoons without success.

One is a brush for basting and one looks like it has a chicken on the end of the spoon.

From the prices I saw for the sets I posted, you might have something that is very valuable.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Ok. let me cover what's been said, and what hasn't been.
I said:
Replica of very old stuff.
Brought home by a solider after one of the world wars, for his wife, probably. Looking at the date I bought it, probably WW1, would have been an old lady's death that got it sent to an antique store in backwoods Arkansas, where I bought it.

Phillip said:
Egyptian, and Roman, I said historical was between those dates. It's a replica of very old stuff.

Mike guessed stuff for the Au and NZ troops in WW1 (who were fighting the Ottoman Empire, what turned into Turkey etc after the war.) No. But I bet a bunch of them were the soldiers who brought them home. The sets like this that hit the US are probably fairly rare, as more AU and NZ troops were in the area where they were made...

They were eating/serving spoons.... but when and where?
Who made the set I have, and why?
I had to talk to veterans and historians to learn all of these answers.

Give y'all a couple more hours.... you're SO close!!
 
Anne Miller
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The case looks like it is from Mytton Rodd or G&E Rodd Pty Ltd

 
Nicole Alderman
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Souvenir spoons were a big hit during the time frame, so these are souvenir spoons probably, made as a replica of an ancient time that's between roman and ancient Egypt.

So, ancient Greece? (Doesn't look right)
Ancient Babylonian/Mesopotamian?
Ancient holy land/Jewish?
Maybe ancient Chinese spoons?

I can't seem to find pictures of spoons from these countries, so I can't make a good guess one way or another...




 
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I'd like to think they were made from melted down weaponry from WW1 as replicas of some sort of ancient spoon design and then sold as souvenirs as Nicole mentions....we could make up some really good stories but I suppose the real history will be good also

I don't know about anyone else but I think I'd like to know the answer by bedtime
 
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Maybe this will help. Maybe not. I have a hunch it might be related to opium or some such thing.
empires1.jpg
[Thumbnail for empires1.jpg]
empires2.jpg
[Thumbnail for empires2.jpg]
empire3.jpg
[Thumbnail for empire3.jpg]
 
Pearl Sutton
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Your absolute last hint:
Mike: the timeline you need would cover the time period of around 500 BC  :D
Your pics are too early, and too late. Find the correct pic? I don't know where you got those (nice timelines!)
 
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Found the right section of that graph for y'all!


And reading back through the whole mess this morning (yesterday got all kinds of chaotic) Nichole said souvenir spoons. I think she wins the apple out of this whole mess!

They are replicas of spoons used by the Persians, made at the end of and after WW1 by people who had been part of the Ottoman Empire, and were now citizens of Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq etc and sold to the soldiers who were stationed there, or who returned later with their wives as tourists. A lot of the troops in the area were from Australia and New Zealand, Anzac with a fair amount of British, and some US soldiers.

They are historically accurate, a retired archeologist recalled seeing some of them in museums in the middle east in the 1950s. Veterans told me about how badly the economies of these countries were trashed by the war, and how people were trying to figure out fairly quickly how to finance their lives again. That part of the world has a ancient tradition of silversmithing, so the smiths started producing these, boxed like the commemorative spoon sets out of England. Look up Darius the Great, King of Persia, he probably had spoons like these on his table. Darius the Great, King of Persia

What a fun thing to play! Thank you all for this round! One of the rowdier ones here :) Extra points to Anne for all those cool pictures! To Mike and Raven for good silly guesses! To Mike for getting Anzac! To Nichole and Phillip for getting closest time wise! To Judith for making me look up things I had never heard of! And to all who played, thank you :) I have had a blast :) I have been down really sick, and this was a fantastic distraction for me :) Y'all are the best!!
I curtsy nicely at you all! Wonderful fun!!


Who has the next thing? Wait, we never figured out Raven's things! Need to repost her picture farther up the thread here...
 
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raven ranson wrote:This came with a bunch of textile tools.  It may or may not be related to textiles.



I'm guessing homemade combs/beaters for tapestry weaving?

The cord might be to attach to the loom to have them handy?

Size?
They look heavy...

My first thought was something to use to spread the woven web while weaving but I can't really picture them as that unless they were tied to something stationary on both sides of the loom.  I've used one when weaving rugs and can't think of what it's called...maybe just a spreader? and it was a hinged wooden tool.

Curious that the metal pegs are uneven...and if it's not related to weaving I'm hopeless
 
Pearl Sutton
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it was suggested that possibly the pegs are uneven because they slide. I reiterate my guess that they are used to judge the depth of wool on a sheep, put it on a sheep, down to the skin,see where the things slide to. Like a contour gauge for wood working. Do they actually slide? No clue!!
 
Nicole Alderman
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Yay!!! I finally won! With the silverware, when I wrote Mesopotamian, I was actually thinking of the Babylonian empire just before the Persians took over (I had mental visions of  king Belshazzar in Babylon that was eating off of the the screed goblets from the Jewish holy temple and God did that spiffy writing-on-the-wall-thing to tell the king he and his kingdom were doomed and that the Persians were going to take over. But, I didn't want to go writing that because, you know, religion outside of the cider press, LOL!)

As for Raven's do-hickies, they look almost handmade. Like someone screwing into the aluminum those screws and then cutting off and blunting the ends of the screws. It almost looks like you can see aluminum pieces still on the threads. But, what someone might have made these for, I really have no idea.
 
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Raven's tools have been bugging me.  I'm pretty sure the pins are a user modification to the tool

I'm sure I've seen those before, I think I've even held something similar.  Probably something in my Dad's shop which would indicate they were either used for saw sharpening, or small engine repair, possibly a tool for doing something on old air cooled VWs.
 
Peter VanDerWal
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Wow Pearl, that was a doozy!   How about something a bit easier this time?

Yesterday I was wondering through the local Salvation Army Thrift store and I found an old wooden toolbox just perfect for the Stanley 45 Plane I posted previously.   $15 for the toolbox and all the junk that was in it.  When I got it home I pulled all the junk out and realized that rather than a random collection of bits and pieces, springs and so forth, that many of the pieces went together, and a lot of the pieces look brand new.  
I spent about an hour puzzling it out before I managed to assemble this (with enough parts to build 4 more, and plenty of spares left over.)



I threw in a bunch of clues to help you folks figure this one out.
 
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I don't know what the tool is called Peter, but I've done the same job with a flat screw driver and hammer...pushing those little doo dads into wood to hold glass in a window and sometimes from lack of supplies I've used them to hold a mirror in a frame and art work.  Looks like a real time saver!

edit...now I see these are the perfectly flat inserts...not the ones with a right angled part to push against?
 
Peter VanDerWal
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Yup, I may have made it a bit to easy by including the glazing points in the picture.

It's usually called a Glazing Point Stapler or Glazing point Driver.  It sits flat on the glass and drives a point into the wooden sash with each squeeze of the trigger.

Interesting side note, the Stanley 45 includes a "Sash Cutter" which is used to carve the sash for wooden windows.    In one step it cuts the decorative Ogee on one side of the sash and the rabbet on the other side that the glass fits into.  I now own the two most useful hand tools for building wooden frame windows.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Peter VanDerWal wrote:Wow Pearl, that was a doozy!  


Ah, y'all knew I knew what they were, you knew there was an answer. :) When I bought them there was a little slip of paper in it, and that's all. I think I paid $10.00 for the set (in 1995 at latest.) I took them to all kinds of people before I knew all the stuff I told you :)

Apple for Judith for the Glazing Point Stapler!! Yay Judith!!

I was about to call it a Glazier's Stapler. Once people quit making wood windows, they started hitting the thrift stores and yard sales. I admit to having passed them up, since I don't make wood windows. I did end up with a few wood windows I'll use in our house we are building, but if I need to repoint any, it won't be many and I'll drive them by hand.

And Peter, what you said about Raven's things, that you have held them... Looking at them that way, I think I have too. They do look awfully familiar... They did not come OUT of a VW engine, I can say that much, I know every bit of a VW engine way too well. Those things are aluminum, and the handle/shaft things are part of it, the pins are not original, they were added to whatever I have  met before. My head is almost saying something about windows or sliding glass doors, but that's not correct either. The handles not being the same length might be a clue. Huh. now you got me all curious again. Too sick to go over to my barn and rat through my crap and see if I see any of them :)  I'll muck on the net a bit later... hmmmm
 
Pearl Sutton
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Raven, still chewing on your thingys. Do the pins (well, nails that were put into the aluminum thing) move, or are they solid? And out of curiosity, do you know what they are for or are you wondering?
 
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I think they are supposed to be solid, but they do move a bit.

they have long leather straps on the end of the handle, as if they were hanging on something or maybe go around someone's wrist while using it?

They are different sizes.

I can't think of how we would use them for fibre production.  
 
Mike Barkley
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Perhaps they're Turkish forks.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Boo, swat to the nose for good joke :)

Everyone knows Turkish forks look like this:


oh, my bad, those are turkey forks :D
And I have one of those in my weed pulling tools pile....

Slain by bad jokes!
 
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I have no idea what this is and my family has been trying to figure it out for a long time - solid brass.
IMG-20181124-WA0001.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG-20181124-WA0001.jpg]
IMG-20181124-WA0002.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG-20181124-WA0002.jpg]
 
Pearl Sutton
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Oh wow.
No clue!
I look forward to learning what it is!! I send out the psychic call to all the people with weird knowledge!

Do the scoops on the front and back connect to each other? Or is it two separate scooped bits?

 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:
Do the scoops on the front and back connect to each other? Or is it two separate scooped bits?



They are separate. It has been suggested that it's used to splice rope, but not too sure about that.
 
Judith Browning
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My husband says it's a 'fid' , a 'marlin spike', used for untieing knots by sailors and other rope work.  
I couldn't find anything exactly like yours though.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marlinspike

Most marlinspikes are 6–12 inches (15–30 cm) long, but may reach 2 feet (61 cm) and more for working heavy cables and ropes. They are usually made from iron or steel, whereas fids, similar in shape and function, are formed from wood or bone.

...no mention of brass.

Your's is much larger than the images I was able to find.



 
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