Win a copy of The Edible Ecosystem Solution this week in the Forest Garden forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • James Freyr
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Greg Martin
  • Leigh Tate

I own it, now what do i do with it

 
Posts: 244
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mom died last spring. I am working on clearing out her house....just now I was in the basement sorting out stuff on shelves. Some stuff is easy, but I have a huge category of stuff I have no idea what to do with....

Chemicals...


Petroleum products, spot cleaners etc...i dont need them, i dont want them, i do not want to throw them out

Styrofoam, I have a million bowls and cups unused...I dont want to use them, i do not want to put them in landfills . BTW this could likely make its own topic, I get delivered Styrofoam a few times a year at least as packing for just about anything.

Cleaning products which are not good for environment. In some ways, I have to admit I am in heaven seeing the old wall cleaners, including TSP (tri sodium phosphate) this is a wonderful cleaner, grease just falls off of things. It is also one of the only cleaners the EPA had the wisdom to ban...well not really but they took the phosphates out of dish soap and laundry detergent.

Insecticides, not many of these but....

What do i do with these products?

 
Posts: 7786
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1569
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Laura, I had something similar with my mom's house. See if your local recycling center has a toxic waste day. There is one here for farm chemicals and rarely one for other toxins. They have a way to identify unlabeled things and are supposed to dispose of properly. Styrofoam is terrible too...I have heard that some places are recycling it but I don't have any sources... if someone sends some in a pkg I send it back out in another.
 
Posts: 9002
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
671
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Burned cleanly in a hot fire with plenty of air, styrofoam is much less harmful than if landfilled or burned under the wrong conditions. There's a reason why commercial chemical disposal often involves incineration. If done right, it works and renders the materials far less harmful than if left alone.
 
steward
Posts: 3406
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
791
hugelkultur urban chicken food preservation bike bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Do you have any construction projects planned?

At sugarmtnfarm.com, Walter showed how he utilized decades worth of saved up styrofoam for the final insulative lid on his super insulated butcher shop. It looked like mostly small styrofoam coolers, like you get vaccines in at a medical office, but I'm not sure.
 
Posts: 416
Location: Otago, New Zealand
3
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Styrofoam can be recycled now.

The chemicals and cleaners.... I would return them to the manufacturer with a note about your problem
 
pollinator
Posts: 1606
Location: northern California
218
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Phosphate-based cleaners and detergents are a huge problem when they get into waterways, partly because they are also potent fertilizers and can cause rapid growth of algae and other invasive water plants, resulting in fish-kills, etc. But judiciously applied to soil or compost, in quantities readily absorbed, and provided the area doesn't leach or run off toward surface water or a storm drain; they would probably benefit it. The same goes for ammonia. It is amazing what a pile of decomposing wood chips inoculated with mushrooms is capable of "eating"---all manner of organic solvents and pesticides, for instance....see Paul Stamet's stuff on this.
 
laura sharpe
Posts: 244
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Alder Burns wrote:Phosphate-based cleaners and detergents are a huge problem when they get into waterways, partly because they are also potent fertilizers and can cause rapid growth of algae and other invasive water plants, resulting in fish-kills, etc. But judiciously applied to soil or compost, in quantities readily absorbed, and provided the area doesn't leach or run off toward surface water or a storm drain; they would probably benefit it. The same goes for ammonia. It is amazing what a pile of decomposing wood chips inoculated with mushrooms is capable of "eating"---all manner of organic solvents and pesticides, for instance....see Paul Stamet's stuff on this.



Oh i am so excited about this idea...of course. I did know the problem in the rivers but it is a most wonderful cleaner. I would like more input about this idea...anyone done this? I would hate to kill off my beneficial bacteria. I got lawn still and it needs nitrogen...hmm I am afraid lol...perhaps i will try on a wee bit of it and see...if it doesnt kill i can move along to the bamboo.
 
Posts: 236
Location: SE Wisconsin, USA zone 5b
7
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here we have a monthly drop off for household chemicals at the muncipal water department. They have chemists working the collection tables that sort them into catagories for proper disposal or recycling.
 
I once met a man from Nantucket. He had a tiny ad
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/t/bootcamp
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic