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ways of growing junipers

 
rose macaskie
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  I have a foto of a pollared juniper, a juniperus thurifera, it has apparently been coppiced to grow beams, there are a lot of beams growing out of its head.
  I have other photos of coppiced ones i shall post as soon this site will let me post a second photo.
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rose macaskie
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Heres a photo of a coppice's juniperus thurifera, there are lots that have been coppice's.
    Jesus Charco in his book, "El Bosque Mediterráneo en el Norte de Äfrica. Diversidad y lucha contra el desertificacion". The Mediterranean wood in the north of Africa diversity and the fight against desertification, says they coppice a similar tree, the arrar, (tetraclinis articulata)in Morroco and the bole of these trees becomes very valuable for making decorative objects a fact that is not good for their survival.
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rose macaskie
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  A way of keeping wood here in Spain, to reduce the fire risk, is to clear them so there are less trees a hectar, they also cut the bottom branches of junipers to reduce the fire risk they could  pose. I post a photo below of a cleared bit of "sabinar" as the woods of sabinar albares, juniperus thuriferas are called.
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rose macaskie
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junipers whose berries are eaten by sheep and lots of other animals grow up thickly if they grow up naturally, that is why i say the trees in the above photo have been thinned out to reduce the fire risk.
  Below a photo of a more natural bit of wood.
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rose macaskie
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  Woods of encinas and ashes are also cleared to reduce the fire risk, i include a foto of a smart farm of these two trees in the Escorial historical town near Madrid.
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rose macaskie
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      Here i post another  photo of a very open wood of another sort of juniper, the oxycedrus which like the thurifera is used used for beams. the wood in the f`hoto is another example of a wood that seems to have been cleared to reduce fire risk, i shall put in another photo of near by woods of thiis tree which shows how these trees grow if they haven't been cleared for fear of fires. this way of treeating woods could be considered in other places with a dangerouse dry season as a way of resolving this problem.

      This is a tree that grows at a lower altitude than the thurifera below a thousand feet, it is a good dry weather, bad soil tree, a good tree to drive back desertification. It is very hardy as to heat and poor soils and its seed is carried by the animals who eat its berries, sheep and goats and deer animals who defecate a lot like sheep and deer which means whole hillsides get seeded with it at once. This means that you can have woods of them with very little human effort if there are berries around for herds of sheep and goats to eat.
      It is a tree hthat forms woods naturally
      Lots of other animals eat its fruit which matures all through the winter months and must be very important to wild animals, and can be used to flavour gin as the berry of the common juniper can.
    Jesus Charco says the juniperus oxycedrus grow in North Africa were  halepensis pines have been planted to stop the desert if the undergrowth under the pines does not get cleaned out. So they seem to serve on the edges of deserts. They certainly grow wild in teh plantacions of pine woods here. pine woods here.
    The bad thing about these trees as reducers of desertification is that they take a very long time to grow, this fault is ermediated by the fact that they get seeded so thickly that they make a good bit of ground cover though you don't have actual trees for some years.
    Another bad point about them is that they must be pretty inflamable. agri rose macaskie.
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rose macaskie
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This reply to myself is to send a photo of a nearby wood of oxycedruses so as to show how densely they normally grow, the photo is of the banks of the river Sorbe in Guadalajara. agri rose macaskie
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rose macaskie
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Another photo of a naturally occurring wood of juniperus oxycedrus at the turn off the road for Retiendas. These are young trees. the bigger trees are encinas, evergreen oaks.agri rose macaskie
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rose macaskie
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I will post here a picture of the leaves of the thurifera photoed with the help of a magnifying glass. It is to certify as far as possible that these trees are what i say they are.
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rose macaskie
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  the trees spring up in covering whole hillside because sheep and deer and other often defacationg hill walkers eat the fruit and defacte the berries any easy way to  seed hillsides and combat deforestation and think of th ehills in afghanistan that we see on the telly they need  easy reforestation with hardy trees
  I post pictures of the fruit.
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rose macaskie
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  in spain they grow oaks for acorns glandiculture as feed for live stock and fro fire wood and their evergreen leaf provides forage in winter. There are variouse ways of prunning and growing the oaks and here i go at telling all about  it.
  i am going to start by posting a photo of a dehesa just over the motorway from the shopping centre Carrefour in Ávila, capital  the province of Ávila. i post this one because there are regular lines of well spaced trees here, what looks like an orderly dehesa.
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rose macaskie
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  I forgot to say that the berries i was posting were ripe winter thurifera berries in summer they are green and later they go brown and woody and look like rabbit droppings. I first asw them were there were rabbits, all very surreal.
      I have another photo of of thurifera beries so you can get an idea of how many there can be so how important they can be for fauna and live stock .
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rose macaskie
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  I post the photo ofthe seeds of juniperus oxycedrus. They are brick red. If the forum will take the version with two photos on one page there will be a foto of the heces full of berries of i dont know what animal, a dog,  boar, or badger or something.
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rose macaskie
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  I post the photo of a place where you can see how thickly the oxycedrus get seeded.  The oxycedrus are in a patch that has not been ploughed on the left. These are young trees i can put in a photo of a full grown tree later. the wood in the distance is pine and not doing very well it seems maybe they ought to have left the land to the hardy junipers.
  The place in this photo is between the turning for "Puebla de Beleña" and the turning off for "La Mierla" on the Guadalajara, Tamajon road.n agri rose macaskie
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rose macaskie
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  Here i would like to post the leaves of the three different types of junipers that grow in Guadalajara. The comun juniper that has the smallest berries and the oxycedrus that has bigger berries that when ripe are brick red and the thurifera that has a different type of leaf and whose berries are as big as those of the oxycedrus but black when ripe in winter.

  There are two other types of juniper in Spain but not in Guadalajara, without mentioning those comun junipers that grow as bushes. agri rose macaskie.
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rose macaskie
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Here i post a photo of the leaves of the common juniper and the oxycedrus. The common juniper has one white strip down the centre of the top of its leaf and the oxycedrus two, one each side of the central vein. agri rose macaskie.
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rose macaskie
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A photo of the fruit of the thurifera dry when it really looks more like the cone it is woody. These fruit opend in the steam of a cooking pot in the kitchen i tried it once more and it did not work. You can see the seeds in these dried fruit. agri rose macaskie
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rose macaskie
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  A favourite group of oxycedruses for me, in a basin next to the Gaudalajara to Tamajon road between the exits to Puebla de Vals and Retiendas. I really like them, they make the landscape more beautifull.
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rose macaskie
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  A photo of the sabinar , wood of sabina albares, juniperus thuriferas between the villages of Tamajon and Almiruete in the province of Guadalajara, Spain, on the left side of the road traveling to Almiruete taken from the hill on the right side of the road.
  This photo shows how a wood of these trees can be.  They are mixed with encinas.
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rose macaskie
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The photo i posted above of the wood is the wood leavign tamajon fr amriruete as  isaid if you leaqve tamajon for majaelrayo you find yourself almost imediately in the very raquitic sabinar of the first fotos these two bits of wood are next door to each other. the floor in this wood is in  apretty bad condition i wonder if people who shoot or heaven only knows who don't cover it with herbicides.

  Posted here, the leaf and berries of the thurifera in summer before they are ripe.
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rose macaskie
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  her a photo of a full grown juniperus oxycedrus.
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