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Growing your greens!

 
Steve Flanagan
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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I'm trying to come up with a list of greens I can grow. I am breaking them down into three catagories; cool season, warm season greens, and Perennials. Some of the plants in the first two categories may be perenials, but are typically treated as annuals. To qualify as a green they should be the leaves or herbaceous stem of a plant. They can be eaten raw as in salads, or cooked liked spinach. Please add any plants you know of, or any suggestions and changes.

Cool Seasons:
Lettuce
Spinach
Chard
Kale
Miners Lettuce
Chickweed
Fava Bean Greens
Radish Greens
Shepherds Purse
Viola

Warm Season:
New Zealand Spinach
Malabar Spinach
Purslane
Nasturtium
Sweet Potato Leaves
Moringa
Lamb's Quarters
Orach
Amaranth

Perennials:
Nopale
Linden
Perennial Broccoli
Tree Collards
Nettles
Mock Strawberry
Anise Hyssop
Egyptian Onion
Salt Bush
Rose of Sharon
Musk Mallow
Garlic Cress
Sorrel
Dandelion Greens
Turkish Rocket
Asparagus
Sea Kale
Good King Henry
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 8844
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Tree Collards are perennial, regular collards seem to live a long time - mine are over two years old. Edible year round.



 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Here is a list of perennial.
http://perennialvegetables.org/perennial-vegetables-for-each-climate-type/mediterranean-and-mild-subtropical/

You should also look into vegetables that self-seed so that you dont have to replant every year. Below is a list that I got off the internet and off permie.com

Herbs: basil, chamomile, cilantro, cutting celery, dill, parsley

Vegetables: amaranth, arugula, beets, broccoli raab, carrots, collards, kale, lettuce, orach, mustards, New Zealand spinach, parsnips, pumpkin, radish, rutabaga, tomatillo, tomato, turnips, winter squash, dill, borage (flowers tasty), lamb’s quarters. Strawberry spinach

Flowers: bachelor button, calendula, celosia, cosmos, nasturtiums, poppies, sunflowers, sweet alyssum, viola

Beet, turnips, parsnip, sweet potatoes, irish potatoes, yams, onions, garlic, etc

Asparagus, Rhubarb, walking onions, lovage, horseradish, Jeruselem artichokes, nettles (cooked of course), safir celery, salad burnet, sorrel, prickly-pear cactus, dandelion (I know everyone hates these), purslane, good king henry, chickweed, balsamroot — Balsamorhiza,
Perennial Sunflower-Edible Root and Seeds, Jerusalem Artichoke

turkish rocket, groundnut, ramps, welsh onion, skirret,

Other useful perennial things :

Seasonings: French tarragon, chives, garlic chives, oregano, marjoram, thymes, sage, costmary, parsley (bi-annual)

Teas: lemon balm, mints, chamomile, fennel

Medicinals: red clover, valerian, self heal, Echinacea, comfrey, dandelion, hops, lavendar, lemon balm, hyssop, horehound, feverfew, calendula (reseeder), bee balm (reseeder), mullein (reseeder), plantain, rue

 
Robert Ray
gardener
Posts: 1349
Location: Cascades of Oregon
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Two things I didn't see listed that I have had good luck with perrenial broccoli and fava bean greens. The perrenial broccoli doesn't really give a head and the fava becomes a dual purpose plant.
In my yard I now have strawberry spinach everywhere after allowing the chickens to clean up a bed the chickens poop makes an effective seed bomb. Easy to control if you zip through with a hoe before the seed heads form.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Robert Ray wrote:Two things I didn't see listed that I have had good luck with perrenial broccoli and fava bean greens. The perrenial broccoli doesn't really give a head and the fava becomes a dual purpose plant.
In my yard I now have strawberry spinach everywhere after allowing the chickens to clean up a bed the chickens poop makes an effective seed bomb. Easy to control if you zip through with a hoe before the seed heads form.


Can we really eat fava bean leaves? I have some growing outside right now, I knew that the "beans" are edible but have never heard about the leaves being eaten.
 
Robert Ray
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Posts: 1349
Location: Cascades of Oregon
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Yes, you can eat them. I was introduced to the greens before I had ever eaten the bean.
 
Steve Flanagan
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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I planted the rest of my fava beans back in the fall. Some have flowers. We have been having some very cold nights, I hope that doesn't ruin them.
I have picked and ate fava greens before, not bad.

I'm trying to dramatically augment my diet to include lots and lots of greens.
 
Steve Flanagan
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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Robert Ray wrote:Two things I didn't see listed that I have had good luck with perrenial broccoli and fava bean greens. The perrenial broccoli doesn't really give a head and the fava becomes a dual purpose plant.
In my yard I now have strawberry spinach everywhere after allowing the chickens to clean up a bed the chickens poop makes an effective seed bomb. Easy to control if you zip through with a hoe before the seed heads form.


I love strawberry spinach. I love the greens and the fruits. I saved some seeds and also scattered other around my garden. I really hope they come up again next year.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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I will have to start eating them as greens.
 
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