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dangers with using pigeon manure?

 
Posts: 9
Location: Villa Alegre, Chile
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We have a pigeon "problem" here on our farm, they like to roost up in the roof above our bedroom and they are noisy. I know the manure is rich in nitrogen and phosphorus and has been used as manure in some cultures for a long time. However some of the locals are warning that it may carry diseases. Any advice out there for 1) building a roost that will attract them away from my roof and 2) safely using the manure in our garden? Thanks!
 
Posts: 210
Location: Manitowoc WI USA Zone 5
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I raced pigeons in the past and used the litter in the garden for great results. I have never heard of any diseases other than the normal pathogens that come with any raw manure. I used a deep litter system that allowed for a 2 inch thick layer of dried droppings - in the coop - that was stirred every so often to keep the moist fresh stuff from forming a mat. I had an open coop and the birds went out foraging most days, so I think the litter was top notch. Of course, there could be some new information I am not aware of!

Oh, about the only method I can think of for the roof is to string loose wires/strings across every few inches. Hard for them to land on and around them. I haven't actually done this, but know some people who have and it slowed them way down.
 
Posts: 135
Location: Sunset Zone 27, Florida
forest garden trees rabbit
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all avian manure can potentially be carrying pathogens like salmonella, psittacosis, and aspergillus fungi. since it is a manure that contains both colonic and renal wastes, it is acidic and should probably be composted before applying to your plants.
that being said, i take the poop from my parrot cage and put it directly on my ornamentals (don't want any potential pathogens on my edibles). always wash your hands thoroughly with warm (hot) water after handling bird poop. and try not to inhale it, since the pathogens can be transmitted by inhalation like a common cold is.
if your pigeon problem leaves wastes in an area where they are allowed to dry out, the poops can and will grow disgusting, deadly fungi called aspergillus. please be careful.
 
Rick Larson
Posts: 210
Location: Manitowoc WI USA Zone 5
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chrissy bauman wrote:all avian manure can potentially be carrying pathogens like salmonella, psittacosis, and aspergillus fungi. since it is a manure that contains both colonic and renal wastes, it is acidic and should probably be composted before applying to your plants.
that being said, i take the poop from my parrot cage and put it directly on my ornamentals (don't want any potential pathogens on my edibles). always wash your hands thoroughly with warm (hot) water after handling bird poop. and try not to inhale it, since the pathogens can be transmitted by inhalation like a common cold is.
if your pigeon problem leaves wastes in an area where they are allowed to dry out, the poops can and will grow disgusting, deadly fungi called aspergillus. please be careful.



I know a few 80 year old pigeon racers, but maybe I ought to do a study of how many died young? HA! Well anyway, mine wifey would like you. Giving facts to her deepest fears. She would lock me up lest I kill everybody with poisonous avian turd fungi!

She is on a kick about rabbit crap right now (she even took turds into the vet for testing), and hope she doesn't read this... Yeah yeah, I know. Its just the facts.
 
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Peter Bennett is a respected Australian gardener/author. Pigeon manure is right at the top of his manure pantheon
He uses crap from domestic birds; wild may well more diseasy
 
chrissy bauman
Posts: 135
Location: Sunset Zone 27, Florida
forest garden trees rabbit
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to my knowledge rabbit manure doesn't have many, or any? pathogens that are known to be deadly to humans. worms? that being said, i always wash my hands after moving it and using it in the garden.
agree with domestic birds having less pathogens than wild birds. but still, if it were my pigeon poo, i would put it in the garden or yard.
 
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