new videos
hot off the press!  
    more about rocket
mass heaters here.

more videos from
the PDC here.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

The Resilient Farm and Homestead by Ben Falk  RSS feed

 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3422
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
201
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


Summary

Credits: Summary prepared by Kaye Derama.

"The Resilient Farm and Homestead" is the ultimate handbook that covers the farm systems created by Ben Falk and his team. They are responsible for developing such systems that will counter the disasters brought about by flood, drought, power outages, and pest. The systems are also made ready for any economical changes and global warming.

This book contains all the information you need to know about earthworms, livestock, composition, fuel wood, water systems and more. It also talks about proper site management and offers results. It also shows amazing site designs.

Book Preview


Where to get it?

Ben's website
Chelsea Green
Amazon.com
Amazon.ca
Amazon.co.uk
Powell's

Related Books

Restoration Agriculture by Mark Shepard

Related Podcasts

Podcast 057 - Preparing a food forest

Interview with Ben Falk on The Survival Podcast

Related Videos



Related Articles

Article on Ben Falk growing rice in cold climate
Hugelkultur: The Ultimate Raised Garden Beds

Related Threads

Growing rice in New England thread at Permies
Pond forum at Permies
Earthworks forum at Permies
Homestead forum at Permies

Related Websites

Ben Falk's Website
 
Devon Olsen
Posts: 1066
Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
7
 
Jonathan Antonucci
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Ben! Love your website! We're very much interested in your new book!
 
paul wheaton
master steward
Posts: 22166
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1976
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
69
bee books chicken forest garden fungi trees
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One thing I really appreciate about this book is how he discusses his experience of implementing permaculture principles and practices. It's real hands-on practical information. For example, in the implementation of orchard guilds he talks about how planting rows with alleys between that can be mowed or grazed makes maintenance easier in a zone away from the house. Maintaining systems over time is a real focus of mine and this book has more of that than most permaculture/gardening books do.
 
R Scott
Posts: 3349
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Matu Collins wrote:One thing I really appreciate about this book is how he discusses his experience of implementing permaculture principles and practices. It's real hands-on practical information. For example, in the implementation of orchard guilds he talks about how planting rows with alleys between that can be mowed or grazed makes maintenance easier in a zone away from the house. Maintaining systems over time is a real focus of mine and this book has more of that than most permaculture/gardening books do.


+1

It is very much a journal of an implementation, mistakes and all. I like that.
 
Jacob Freepons
Posts: 33
Location: Costa Rica
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lots of great info in this book. As others have said it contains alot of practical info and experiences.

I really appreciate his in-depth design analysis' and thorough design plans/maps

 
Lorenzo Costa
steward
Posts: 800
Location: Italy, Siena, Gaiole in Chianti zone 9
206
books forest garden trees woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
the thread is old but I thought interesting writing down a few things. Ben Falk is going to become one of the big guys in permaculture in the next ten years, if he already isn't. the book is one of the best recent works that breaks down some of the myths even we have in permaculture and explains what really happens in true life on a homestead. just think about the way he discusses the use of animals on a homestead, and how he explains that we sometimes assume certain breeds of chicken are better than others, like his experience with indian runners. He explains how all this really is a theoretical vision. One has to try, it's all through the book. If whe look at the comments made by people that have participated to the pdc courses he organises they all highlight how it's so hand's on and the book passes on this message.
One thing I really loved of the book is even the way it's written, it has a gender neutral language in it, we may not think about these things often but instead they count and Ben even in this demonstrates how much he cares to share a different way of speaking and writing.
there is one thing I will in the next future write directly to Ben: the book is a work in progress and he recalls many times the fact that in future editions of the book he will give the new info on the results of experiments he has done or that for when the book was first published hadn't yet given proven data. Can't we think of an update on the site of whole systems design so those who already had the book don't have to rebuy it and can have the info at hand to complete the vision?
 
John Mercer
Posts: 9
Location: Montrose, CO
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I read this book a few months ago. Like other people have said, it's full of practical advice, but I found it a little difficult to read. It reads almost more like a textbook, and also sort of a 'prepper' angle to the writing. Also, the book focuses on the NE USA biome. What I would love is a similar book written with regards to the intermountain west, or the high desert. My favorite part of this book was the food crop chapter. There were some unique & interesting perspectives in there.
 
Matt Baldwin
Posts: 5
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'd give this one 9 "acorns". I read this one this past winter, so it's been a few months. Really good book for cold-climate growing, has lots of PRACTICAL ideas, backed up with real-world experience.
 
Lorenzo Costa
steward
Posts: 800
Location: Italy, Siena, Gaiole in Chianti zone 9
206
books forest garden trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I give this book 8 out of 10 acorns

For the review fo this book I'll recall what i wrote a bot of time ago when on permies we didn't have the acorn scale.

Ben Falk is going to become one of the big guys in permaculture in the next ten years, if he already isn't. the book is one of the best recent works that breaks down some of the myths even we have in permaculture and explains what really happens in true life on a homestead. just think about the way he discusses the use of animals on a homestead, and how he explains that we sometimes assume certain breeds of chicken are better than others, like his experience with indian runners. He explains how all this really is a theoretical vision. One has to try, it's all through the book. If whe look at the comments made by people that have participated to the pdc courses he organises they all highlight how it's so hand's on and the book passes on this message.
One thing I really loved of the book is even the way it's written, it has a gender neutral language in it, we may not think about these things often but instead they count and Ben even in this demonstrates how much he cares to share a different way of speaking and writing.
there is one thing I will in the next future write directly to Ben: the book is a work in progress and he recalls many times the fact that in future editions of the book he will give the new info on the results of experiments he has done or that for when the book was first published hadn't yet given proven data. Can't we think of an update on the site of whole systems design so those who already had the book don't have to rebuy it and can have the info at hand to complete the vision?

Still believe what I wrote, the book and the author are big. An update can be we're all looking forward to see Permaculture skills, the DvD set, that is going to be 4 dvd's instead of 3 due to be out at the endo of may!!
 
Michael Newby
gardener
Posts: 697
Location: Mount Shasta, CA Zone 8a Mediterranean climate
134
books chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I give this book 8 out of 10 acorns.

This is a great read for the wide-eyed new permaculturalist that can't understand why their property doesn't look like one of Geoff Lawton's amazing videos even though they've been working on the land for a few years. You get to see some of Ben's hiccups along the way as well as get some insight as to lessons learned and solutions found.

Filled with inspiring photos coupled with good writing, I expect this book will end up on many a permies' shelf.
 
D. Logan
gardener
Posts: 584
Location: Soutwest Ohio
99
books food preservation forest garden rabbit tiny house
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A solid 8 out of 10 acorns.

Let me start by saying how beautiful some of the images are in this book. There is something about beautiful pictures that can really draw you into a book. So where do I stand on this work besides the pictures?

I would say that this book is absolutely ideal for beginners. That said, it may be an interesting read for just about anyone. Those who would prefer a quicker movement towards the point may find the way he writes a bit frustrating. The book takes its time weaving through ideas and the author's philosophies.

It sits somewhere between a philosophy book, a how-to manual and a memoir. If it fails in leaning a particular way, I would say it is the how-to. It is long on ideas but limited in direct instructions. The heavy cost of some things may be off-putting to those who wish to be more directly hands-on or who have tight budgets (as I am sure many a Permie is or has been).

I'd say it is a book worth buying, but if you can only get a copy at the library for now, it isn't going to be a problem. It might take you a while to read through and digest it all, though.
8acorns.png
[Thumbnail for 8acorns.png]
 
Annie Daellenbach
Posts: 19
Location: Santa Cruz, Ca
4
food preservation fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I give this book 9 out of 10 acorns.

Ben Falk has created an inspiring book, full of breathtaking photographs. I found myself making lists of seeds to seek out, reading about what he has grown; I viewed my own backyard differently, after working my way through his richly informative text. This book is a treasure for anyone studying the philosophy of permaculture. Ben Falk is a natural teacher, his book is substantial and his explanations thorough. He so eloquently walks us through his ideas, mistakes and successes, his principals. The Resilient Farm and Homestead will help you to develop a closer relationship with your land, clarifying your ability to plan and prioritize your survival needs in the event of a system collapse. I found this book to have more than enough completely original content to earn it a valued place on my shelf.
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1976
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
69
bee books chicken forest garden fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've been planting my new trees and bushes using his alley system and, so far so good.

I agree that as his systems mature and he gains even more experience he is becoming one of the major permaculture voices. He clearly is walking the walk, observing, working on the land, self regulating. Especially here in New England, I'm excited to see how he does.
 
Switching from electric heat to a rocket mass heater reduces your carbon footprint as much as parking 7 cars. Tiny ad:
2017 Rocket Mass Heater Workshop Jamboree (early bird price now)
https://permies.com/wiki/63312/permaculture-projects/Rocket-Mass-Heater-Workshop-Jamboree
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!