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Which hedge plants for pigs ?

 
Fournier Lyra
Posts: 4
Location: FRANCE - Ambierle
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Somebody has already use hedge plants like fences for pigs ?
In France, we can see that for cow. But pigs are smaller, so I need to find the goog plants.
 
Matt Saager
Posts: 48
Location: Oregon - Willamette Valley
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I haven't actually tried this myself... although my father-in-law tells me it used to be done quite a bit.
Apparently Osage Orange can be copiced into a living hedgerow, and can be grown tight enough to keep hogs inside a pasture.

Here's an article in Mother Earth News that describes the process in pretty good detail.
http://www.motherearthnews.com/modern-homesteading/living-fences-z10m0sto.aspx

Probably someone else on the forums has tried this, and can give you more detail from their experiences.
 
Matt Smith
Posts: 181
Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
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Matt Saager wrote:I haven't actually tried this myself... although my father-in-law tells me it used to be done quite a bit.
Apparently Osage Orange can be copiced into a living hedgerow, and can be grown tight enough to keep hogs inside a pasture.

Here's an article in Mother Earth News that describes the process in pretty good detail.
http://www.motherearthnews.com/modern-homesteading/living-fences-z10m0sto.aspx

Probably someone else on the forums has tried this, and can give you more detail from their experiences.


This is on my to-do list in some places, once I get the proper layout of various pasture areas "correct." I'll start with a "real" fence and transition to an osage orange hedgerow.

The wood burns super hot (good for getting fires started, although I've heard it gets too hot to burn as the main fuel wood), and is supposedly useful for other things as well.
 
James Colbert
Posts: 268
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Osage, black locust, tasagate, honey locust, raspberries, blackberries, and wild roses can all be used as "fedges" (fence hedges). You can use almost any fast growing resilient plant.
 
Walter Jeffries
Posts: 1085
Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
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I can give you some "not to use" items. Our pigs chow down on blackberry canes, raspberry canes, rose bushes (we have lots of wild), burdock and thistles. They must have tongues like giraffes.
 
Fournier Lyra
Posts: 4
Location: FRANCE - Ambierle
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Hi

Thanks, for all this information ! I take time to translate and studie.
So, I will make a hedge plants with prunus because Ihave a lot of them !!!

 
John Polk
master steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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So, I will make a hedge plants with prunus because I have a lot of them !!!


That is a true permies answer: Use what you already have, especially since they seem to grow well in your region.
You do need to let them mature to the point that the pigs don't just eat them for breakfast.

 
Fournier Lyra
Posts: 4
Location: FRANCE - Ambierle
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Hi

On my wild pasture, I was thinking let the pigs plow the ground, but I found this wild mound of soil. Why are there mound of soil ? May be I don't have to plow !? Better to keep the mound of soil and grow garden with the "Soltner method" : (put hay on the ground instead of plowing).
croquis.jpg
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Wild pasture with hedge plant
pasture.jpg
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Wild pasture with hedge plants
butte.jpg
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Wild mound of soil
 
Renate Howard
pollinator
Posts: 755
Location: zone 6b
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You can also bend the branches/trunks down to horizontal and tie them to the trunks of other prunus to keep them that way. They should send up new growth all along the now horizontal part to fill in gaps. In a method called "inosculation" you rub off the protective coating over the living part of the bark on two branches then tie them together for a year. They grow to each other as if it's one tree.
 
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