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Looking for Caragana arborescens (Siberian pea shrub) seed source  RSS feed

 
Adrien Lapointe
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Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
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I am looking for a large quantity of siberian pea shrub seeds. Anybody knows a good source that ships to Canada?
 
John Polk
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What do you consider 'large quantity'?

treeshrubseeds
has a minimum order (1 ounce) which should be a little over 1,000 seeds for $3.20

They have about the best prices for quantity tree/shrub seeds, and a fantastic selection.



 
Adrien Lapointe
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Thanks for the link John.

By the pound is large quantity to me . But I only have a few square meters of garden.

That is for my father and I think he will plant them over a few acres, so I would think that a pound would be more than enough.

Might be a bit tricky to get them across the border though. The website says: "Canadian customers please contact your Agricultural Department."
 
Cj Sloane
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Here's another source: jlhudsonseeds The pricing looks similar.
 
John Polk
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While he is usually not as cheap for large bulk JLHudsons is my favorite seedsman.

Check out his Canadian page.

The current owner (David Theodoropoulos - author of INVASION BIOLOGY: Critique of a Pseudoscience) has been there for 39 years ever since he 'dropped out & returned to the earth'. He is a strong opponent of the USDA's 'white-listing' of species, and has been extremely vocal about it.



 
Adrien Lapointe
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That is good, JL Husdon says: "ALL TYPES OF SEED, including tree and shrub seed and corn seed in small packets may now be shipped directly to Canada without import permit, phytosanitary certificate or delay. A few types such as wheat (Triticum) are prohibited."

I also found a Nova Scotia website that sells all type of perennial and woodie seeds: http://www.gardensnorth.com/site/ They are more expensive though.
 
John Polk
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I suggest you buy one item from JLHudson, AND request a catalog.

His catalog is loaded with information. I often use it like a reference book.

The only down-side is that you will find hundreds of varieties that you need.
He has many items that are very hard to find. Things most nurseries will not bother with.
To him, it is a lifelong hobby.

"We are a public seed bank, not a seed company."

 
Connie Farmer
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I've lived with caragana since I was a kid. The seeds don't taste very good, but the blossoms sure do! We kids used to strip them and eat them all the time, they are sweet like honey. I love this plant. It does need a good cold winter, so that may be why people on the west coast have less success with this one. Maybe plant it in the coldest spot you can find and hope. It's been my experience that deer (we have both mule and whitetail here) do not bother it at all. Rabbits, squirrels, etc, seem to eat it. I've always just dug some up from somebody else's yard, then it spreads all by itself. Doesn't even seem to matter what time of year you dig it out. I am going to try some cuttings this year and see how it goes. I don't think I could every have too much caragana. It's far prettier than lilac, too, and useful. It does produce a LOT of pods, about the size of sweet pea pods, so I think if the chickens like it, you could pick it and store easily. 36% protein is nothing to pass up, IMO. I wonder if you could sprout it before feeding to increase nutrition.
 
Cee Ray
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Location: BC Interior, zone 5a
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angelgrove in newfoundland has them, but pricey

http://www.trees-seeds.com/seeds.htm
 
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