• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

LAST TIME, ONCE MORE TO ESTABLISH OR ELSE  RSS feed

 
                            
Posts: 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
[size=10pt]THIS is absolutely the last time I try to do anything for a lawn in my yard.  I've spent too much time (and I'm not getting any younger) doing everything I can think of to get a lawn growing but due to my neighbor's weeds and some other stuff, I get no results just more weeds.  I'm broke from all the money spent on seed.  I'm retired and don't have a lot anyway.

I have been trying to get decent grass growing in my yard for years.  Use to have some nice grass but it got taken over by my neighbors weeds.  Also, one year I was sick and didn't get the leaves raked in the fall and the next year the lawn was terrible.  Any kind of weeds, you name it I got it.

I spent many backbreaking hours the past two summers tearing out the most disgusting roots all over my yard which is seemingly destroying the soil.  the soil looks sick, weird color, not rich looking and also its clay soil, very heavy and hard to work in as it must be dry if it is at all wet you have concrete as a result.

I actually hoed a large section of my front yard and worked off a few extra pounds too to loosen the soil.  I added some diatenaceous earth (not sure the spelling on that) and also some gypsum but the soil still sucks.  Anyway, this year I got a tiller and I have been tilling which has helped with the soil but its backbreaking coz I gotta hang onto the tiller or it takes off, might kill somebody, lol sort of.  Anyway, I had put down new grass seed last year and it came up nice but with 3 weeks or so the weeds took over.  I'M TIRED of living my life around trying to get grass again.  Right now my lawn is dirt with weeds that came back after I sprayed with roundup.  Don't like using roundup, I have bunnies and puppies in my yard but these weeds are tenacious.  Even after the roundup the #*@$ weeds came back up again.  I can't get rid of the weeds so I'm pulling my hair out instead.  I have tried pulling weeds with some success but its no answer for my large yard.

I'm getting ready to put grass seed down again as i waited out the summer thinking it would be too hot

This is the last time I'm doing this as I've spent a fortune on seed, etc.  ITS NOW or never, if it doesn't grow after this I give up and will just open the floodgates to my LAZY NEIGHBOR'S plentiful weed supply.

My yard is pretty with lots of flowers and ornamental trees, did a lot of work but the grass/weed/bare dirt thing has ruined the way it looks.

I guess I need to get a ph check but other than that what?

Also, I read about vinegar as a herbicide?  how much vinegar?  straight?  I'd way prefer that as I don't like mucking about in roundup but like I said I'm desperate.  And info about the vinegar "thingy" would really be appreciated.

Thanks any tips
[/size]
 
jeremiah bailey
Posts: 343
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Do have some pictures of your lawn? Both wide angle and close up will help us tremendously in helping you. Lay off any herbicides for now, vinegar, organic, and especially roundup. All kinds of herbicides are just that: plant killers. And since you are trying to grow plants, ie. grass, you need to stop with the plant killers. Grass is fairly sensitive to herbicides, more so than most weeds are. You're just making it harder to grow a nice lawn. Yes, vinegar makes a good herbicide, but more on that after you get your lawn reestablished. It won't help you much until then.

Get your soil analyzed. Get some pics of your yard posted. Lay off the herbicides. Lay off of tilling or otherwise disturbing your soil as well.
 
paul wheaton
master steward
Posts: 22347
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm glad that my neighbors have weeds.  It shows that they are not poisoning me.

And I like to go out to where the dandelions or hawkweed have made puff balls and blow on the puffballs. 

And the turf is thick and green and rich with life.

Have you read my lawn care article? 

You mention roundup.  Before I can help you, I need you to pledge that you will never use any roundup or any other chemical herbicide ever again.  And that you are strictly organic from here on out.

Further, I need you to take a look at this thread.

 
                            
Posts: 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
[size=10pt]I do have some pictures and I will post them tomorrow.  there isn't too much to see wide angle as the lawn is practically nonexistent except for weeds.

I'll attach pics tomorrow.
[/size]
 
                            
Posts: 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
paul wheaton wrote:
I'm glad that my neighbors have weeds.  It shows that they are not poisoning me.

And I like to go out to where the dandelions or hawkweed have made puff balls and blow on the puffballs. 

And the turf is thick and green and rich with life.

Have you read my lawn care article? 

You mention roundup.  Before I can help you, I need you to pledge that you will never use any roundup or any other chemical herbicide ever again.  And that you are strictly organic from here on out.

Further, I need you to take a look at this thread.


Paul, i will happily swear off Round-up since you say you have the answer without it.  I don't like using it and usually don't however these weeds are so tenacious (I killed them off one fall and they came back in the spring) that out of desparation I bought some.  I don't like it because I have birds and rabbits that either visit my yard or live there and lots of squirrels, which though pesky are funny to watch.  I also have two little chihuahuas so a blessing to anyone who can show me how to do what I need without them.

I am waiting for the rain to stop so I can get out my tiller again and use where I'm going to plant grass because the ground isn't level and also to grind up the weeds that remain and the ground, periodically, is full of tenacious roots to something, various plants that survive when nothing else will its about to make me nuts.  My son, bless his heart, just bought me a huge bag of grass seed and combined with what I already had (its all tall fescue) I have enough of that I just need it to stop raining as the soil is largely clay and working it when its wet is a disaster but I need to get it in before it gets too cold for the seed to germinate and I've gone nearly two years without a decent lawn.  PLEASE HELP!
 
                            
Posts: 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
jeremiah bailey wrote:
Do have some pictures of your lawn? Both wide angle and close up will help us tremendously in helping you. Lay off any herbicides for now, vinegar, organic, and especially roundup. All kinds of herbicides are just that: plant killers. And since you are trying to grow plants, ie. grass, you need to stop with the plant killers. Grass is fairly sensitive to herbicides, more so than most weeds are. You're just making it harder to grow a nice lawn. Yes, vinegar makes a good herbicide, but more on that after you get your lawn reestablished. It won't help you much until then.

Get your soil analyzed. Get some pics of your yard posted. Lay off the herbicides. Lay off of tilling or otherwise disturbing your soil as well.
[size=10pt]I SEE you recommend not tilling though for the life of me I can't understand why as there are great ruts in the ground where ugly weeds have been pulled out and all sorts of irregularities.  The soil is in horrible shape.  where these weird root growths are, many of them very very tiny roots like thread you would sew with and just as tough clog the earth and i can't see how anything would grow in it.  Since I've done some tilling the soil seems in better shape.  But I'm no where near through.  Why do you say not to till, mind you I don't like doing it but this is my last time I do anything with myi lawn after this I give up if this doesnt work so I want to do the best that I can.[/size]
 
Jeremy Bunag
gardener
Posts: 231
Location: Central IL
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tilling generally frowned upon here for some important reasons (here are the top 3 that come to my mind):

  • [li]It destroys the soil structure/takes the homes away from the good biologicals in your soil[/li]
    [li]It sows weed seeds that were deeper in the soil or laying on the top[/li]
    [li]It always settles in a way you're not expecting (especially for lawns)[/li]


  • I prefer to add soil or compost to level smaller areas.  On a bigger scale box scrapers do less damage than tillers, and work over larger areas with less effort.  Both of these options share some of the drawbacks of tilling, but to much lesser a degree.

    Tillers still have their place in my arsenal, but I find I'm using them less and less as other methods come to light.  About all I can think of now is using them to mix in amendments that do better deeper in the soil rather than surface applied...and I don't do that much anymore.
     
                                
    Posts: 12
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    paul wheaton wrote:
    I'm glad that my neighbors have weeds.  It shows that they are not poisoning me.

    And I like to go out to where the dandelions or hawkweed have made puff balls and blow on the puffballs. 

    And the turf is thick and green and rich with life.

    Have you read my lawn care article? 

    You mention roundup.  Before I can help you, I need you to pledge that you will never use any roundup or any other chemical herbicide ever again.  And that you are strictly organic from here on out.

    Further, I need you to take a look at this thread.


    [size=10pt]I've managed to make quite a difference by old-fashioned pulling of weeds.  Before my lawn got so bad its what I used to do to control the weeds, actually and my neighbor on the other side of me used to say I was wasting my time because I wasn't getting the whole thing, root and all, but I proved he was wrong because my lawn looked pretty good NOT PERFECT that way.  With that in mind, I wish my clueless neighbor would realize the invention.  It starts with looking for weeds and then upon seeing one, bending at the waist or some other method to get close enough to the weed to grab it and then pull it out of the ground.  It's a simple concept lost upon him.  Actually, I have pulled weeds in his yard trying to create some sort of barrier between his land of the lost and mine but I am losing the battle on all fronts.  While its true this is the "land of the free" and one can do within reason as one chooses, there is such a thing as being a responsible person and neighbor.  Allowing small tree-size weeds to grow along the fenceline which eventually invade my flowering shrubs and weaken or destroy them doesn't seem to bother this oaf, actually there are two oafs, mr and mrs. oaf.  If I go to the trouble of cutting out some of said tree-sized weeds for them i do manage to get their attention and they complain loudly about my interfering with nature as it is in their yard.  The concept they fail to grasp is that what is "over there" eventually comes "over here" and if they don't address it I will.  The mr. oaf even said if I don't stop cutting down his weeds then he is going to start cutting down mine (which there are none but hey be my guest).
    Now, having exposed myself as a shrew and a harpy, I just had to get that out.  It has nothing to do with the subject, except on the periphery but sometimes I get tired of biting my tongue.
    As I said, up until a couple of years ago, I never touched the dreaded Roundup or any other weed killer, I pulled weeds and eventually it made a difference.  I don't like chemicals because there are little creatures which share my yard with me, bunnies who help themselves to some of my tomatoes but I'm willing to share after all bunnies know nothing of property deeds or boundaries and neither do the squirrels, pesky little rodents who still manage to amuse me and give my dogs something to do, aspiring to catch one but never succeeding.  My dogs entertain the squirrels with what appears to be one of their favorite games: Can't Catch Me.  They enjoy coming out into the open, the thrill of the chase, and their amazing ability to climb trees and jump from branch to branch.  Until she passed away, my little yorkie (whose vision had grown poorly) would sit faithfully at the base of a tree the squirrel she was pursuing climbed into, happily unaware the squirrel had used the canopy of trees to make his escape long ago.  Its a balance of nature I enjoy.  Occasionally Ive seen a possum or two show up, always surreptiously at night, and while I don't wish to personally interact with them, they do their thing and I do mine.  Actually, I had observed a mouse who was observing me as I was observing my ornamental fish pond.  He looked quite sociable and seemed to be sharing a moment of camaraderie with me and seemed also to approve of the little pond I was admiring.  When i first saw him  and before it registered what it was, I do recall our exchanging glances, he seeming to say, "nice evening isn't it, nice pond" until I gather my wits and realized what it/he/she was.  He made his escape and actually we had a detente of sorts.  'I won't bother you (rodents) unless you bother" me which indeed did happen as I saw a rat (makes me shiver) run into my attached garage on fall.  He never made it into my house but it was quite a process involving removing everything from said garage that could be removed and hosing it out with cold water, thus convincing him he was unwanted.


    I digress, I'm afraid, from the topic at hand, except to show you that I am not someone in love with chemicals, I avoid them whenever possible but as the case with the rat, eventually one has to be sensible when threats to health become involved.

    More than you all wanted to know but nevertheless, bearing in mind I can't figure out how to upload pictures (and I am computer literate so I'm frustrated by this inability) I am filling in a bit of history in lieu of pictures, for the time being.
         
    [/size]
     
    paul wheaton
    master steward
    Posts: 22347
    Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
    bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    First, the difference between "soil" and "dirt" is that soil is dirt + organic matter (dead leaves, worm poop, dead grass bits, bird poop, tiny twigs, etc.).

    Each time you till, 30% of your organic matter is released into the atmosphere and your soil is getting more and more like a cement-ish dirt where nothing will grow. 

    And there are the things that Jeremy pointed out. 

    Next, a lot of bad ideas have been borne out of desperation.  Let's talk a moment about how desperate you are.  You aren't gonna die if you don't have a first class lawn.  If you do this stuff because without it you'll be miserable, but all of your attempts so far have made you miserable, then it seems that for you, lawn is misery!  Take it easy!  Let it go!  If you embrace the idea of being happy despite your lawn (or patch of cement-ish dirt) then all of this will be a pleasure and not a source for pain. 

    Next, we'll get your lawn looking damn good, right quick.  And it will be easy.

    If you you have soil, don't till.  If you have cement-ish dirt where nothing will grow, tilling won't hurt anything.  But if we're gonna till, let's make it do some good.

    but I proved he was wrong because my lawn looked pretty good NOT PERFECT that way.


    I wonder what your vision of perfect looks like? 

    For me, it is a thick, green turf .... green throughout the summer ...  speckled with herbs and wildflowers ...  that feels spongy under my bare feet and smells wonderful when I mow it. 

    I wish my clueless neighbor would realize the invention.  It starts with looking for weeds and then upon seeing one, bending at the waist or some other method to get close enough to the weed to grab it and then pull it out of the ground.  It's a simple concept lost upon him. 


    While I am familiar with the technique and I have pulled a few thousand weeds over time, I would have to say that I have not pulled a weed from a lawn for many years ....  maybe more than ten years?  And that was eliminating bindweed and canadian thistle (while leaving dandelion, plantain, chickweed and others). 

    I don't have much dandelion anymore.  Which is too bad, because I really like blowing the puffballs. 

    In fact, I once saw a dandelion that was something like three feet tall!  I wouldn't mind getting some of the seed from that.  I could plant it around and blow some really amazing puffballs!

    Actually, I have pulled weeds in his yard trying to create some sort of barrier between his land of the lost and mine but I am losing the battle on all fronts.  While its true this is the "land of the free" and one can do within reason as one chooses, there is such a thing as being a responsible person and neighbor.  Allowing small tree-size weeds to grow along the fenceline which eventually invade my flowering shrubs and weaken or destroy them doesn't seem to bother this oaf, actually there are two oafs, mr and mrs. oaf.


    And you might think of me as cousin oaf. 

    With a few exceptions, most plants that you would call "weeds" serve a very important function.  And they are, in my opinion, doing you a HUGE service.  You are simply not aware of that service.  Nor do you appreciate it .... yet. 

    I can make a plan for you to have all of the plants you want and have ZERO weeds.  You can go out onto any part of property and blow puffballs and throw around all sorts of weed seeds, but none of them will take.  And your neighboring properties can be loaded with millions of weeds throwing off billions of weeds seeds all landing on your property - where they will quickly germinate and then die.  Or simply rot ... or .... lots of other things that lead to not having them on your property.

    My vision for you is very rich, but I want to start off with a really simple picture so you can understand where I am going. 

    Suppose your property is packed full of giant cedar trees.    You can walk around between your trees quite easily.  The ground is covered with cedar tree duff (twigs and needles and the like).  Have you ever been to cedar grove?  My experience is that most cedar groves that are nothing but giant cedar trees have nothing else growing under them.    No dandelion.  No black medic.  No plantain.  Nothing.    Naturally. 

    So, here we have at least one scenario where billions of weed seeds can be tossed into this situation and no weeds will take. 

    I could go into a lot of detail on why this is, but let's just say nothing out-competes a cedar tree.  Competition is the name of the game.

    When you mow low, you make it easy for your weeds to out-compete your grass.    When you mow high, grass outcompetes almost everything.  If you mowed your cedar to three inches, it would give up too. 

    By mowing low, you made a weed nursery.  And your neighbors supplied the weed seed. 

    If you had a giant cedar grove, you would not think your neighbors were oafs. 

    So, if all of your soil was loaded with stuff you liked that could out-compete any weed that might try to come up, then no weed would have a chance.  Ever. 

    ....  I keep finding myself wanting to express a hundred other things, but I have a lot of other things to do today ...  so I'm gonna move on ...

    If I go to the trouble of cutting out some of said tree-sized weeds for them i do manage to get their attention and they complain loudly about my interfering with nature as it is in their yard.  The concept they fail to grasp is that what is "over there" eventually comes "over here" and if they don't address it I will.


    They are right and you are wrong. 

    If you came to my yard and started hacking down my stuff I would be very upset.  I think I could even make a legal claim against you.  I strongly recommend that you not do that anymore and that you owe your neghbors an apology and a plate of home made cookies.

    The mr. oaf even said if I don't stop cutting down his weeds then he is going to start cutting down mine (which there are none but hey be my guest).


    Of course, "weed" just means unwanted plants.  If you invite him to come to your property and cut down anything he thinks of as a weed, that could easily include all trees, roses, bushes, etc.  And if he recorded you saying that, then he could legally do exactly that.    I suggest a casserole to go with the cookies. 

    Now, having exposed myself as a shrew and a harpy, I just had to get that out.


    I think "harpy" is a really fun word.  I need to work it into daily conversation more often.

    but as the case with the rat, eventually one has to be sensible when threats to health become involved.


    You might want to take that up in the critter care forum.  We'll help you get rid of rats without any chemicals.


     
                                
    Posts: 12
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    paul wheaton wrote:
    First, the difference between "soil" and "dirt" is that soil is dirt + organic matter (dead leaves, worm poop, dead grass bits, bird poop, tiny twigs, etc.).

    Each time you till, 30% of your organic matter is released into the atmosphere and your soil is getting more and more like a cement-ish dirt where nothing will grow. 

    And there are the things that Jeremy pointed out. 

    Next, a lot of bad ideas have been borne out of desperation.  Let's talk a moment about how desperate you are.  You aren't gonna die if you don't have a first class lawn.  If you do this stuff because without it you'll be miserable, but all of your attempts so far have made you miserable, then it seems that for you, lawn is misery!  Take it easy!  Let it go!  If you embrace the idea of being happy despite your lawn (or patch of cement-ish dirt) then all of this will be a pleasure and not a source for pain. 

    Next, we'll get your lawn looking damn good, right quick.  And it will be easy.

    If you you have soil, don't till.  If you have cement-ish dirt where nothing will grow, tilling won't hurt anything.  But if we're gonna till, let's make it do some good.

    I wonder what your vision of perfect looks like? 

    For me, it is a thick, green turf .... green throughout the summer ...  speckled with herbs and wildflowers ...  that feels spongy under my bare feet and smells wonderful when I mow it. 

    While I am familiar with the technique and I have pulled a few thousand weeds over time, I would have to say that I have not pulled a weed from a lawn for many years ....  maybe more than ten years?  And that was eliminating bindweed and canadian thistle (while leaving dandelion, plantain, chickweed and others). 

    I don't have much dandelion anymore.  Which is too bad, because I really like blowing the puffballs. 

    In fact, I once saw a dandelion that was something like three feet tall!  I wouldn't mind getting some of the seed from that.  I could plant it around and blow some really amazing puffballs!

    And you might think of me as cousin oaf. 

    With a few exceptions, most plants that you would call "weeds" serve a very important function.  And they are, in my opinion, doing you a HUGE service.  You are simply not aware of that service.  Nor do you appreciate it .... yet. 

    I can make a plan for you to have all of the plants you want and have ZERO weeds.  You can go out onto any part of property and blow puffballs and throw around all sorts of weed seeds, but none of them will take.  And your neighboring properties can be loaded with millions of weeds throwing off billions of weeds seeds all landing on your property - where they will quickly germinate and then die.  Or simply rot ... or .... lots of other things that lead to not having them on your property.

    My vision for you is very rich, but I want to start off with a really simple picture so you can understand where I am going. 

    Suppose your property is packed full of giant cedar trees.    You can walk around between your trees quite easily.  The ground is covered with cedar tree duff (twigs and needles and the like).  Have you ever been to cedar grove?  My experience is that most cedar groves that are nothing but giant cedar trees have nothing else growing under them.    No dandelion.  No black medic.  No plantain.  Nothing.    Naturally. 

    So, here we have at least one scenario where billions of weed seeds can be tossed into this situation and no weeds will take. 

    I could go into a lot of detail on why this is, but let's just say nothing out-competes a cedar tree.  Competition is the name of the game.

    When you mow low, you make it easy for your weeds to out-compete your grass.    When you mow high, grass outcompetes almost everything.  If you mowed your cedar to three inches, it would give up too. 

    By mowing low, you made a weed nursery.  And your neighbors supplied the weed seed. 

    If you had a giant cedar grove, you would not think your neighbors were oafs. 

    So, if all of your soil was loaded with stuff you liked that could out-compete any weed that might try to come up, then no weed would have a chance.  Ever. 

    ....  I keep finding myself wanting to express a hundred other things, but I have a lot of other things to do today ...  so I'm gonna move on ...

    They are right and you are wrong. 

    If you came to my yard and started hacking down my stuff I would be very upset.  I think I could even make a legal claim against you.  I strongly recommend that you not do that anymore and that you owe your neghbors an apology and a plate of home made cookies.

    Of course, "weed" just means unwanted plants.  If you invite him to come to your property and cut down anything he thinks of as a weed, that could easily include all trees, roses, bushes, etc.  And if he recorded you saying that, then he could legally do exactly that.    I suggest a casserole to go with the cookies. 

    I think "harpy" is a really fun word.  I need to work it into daily conversation more often.

    You might want to take that up in the critter care forum.  We'll help you get rid of rats without any chemicals.





    First of all, I didn't go into his yard to cut down the tree sized weeds, they came into my yard, invading flowering bushes like weigalia and forsythia with things that have great giant pods that sprout more weeds. 

    If what you view as beautiful is something that destroys flowering plants that attract hummingbirds and all sorts of other wildlife the good luck to you.

    I don't really care for your attitude.

    You are an "elitist".

    I don't view a nice lawn as happiness but if I am going to do something I will do it the best I can and not try ten different times to do it ten different ways.  I'm trying to do a good job this one time.

    And these neighbors of mine you defend don't spend five seconds outside to see the damage their vegetation does so why would they care.  I shouldn't have to cut it down they should.

    Its destroying the fence having a tree growing where the fence should/used to be.

    Have a nice life.
     
    paul wheaton
    master steward
    Posts: 22347
    Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
    bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    kcsummer wrote:
    If what you view as beautiful is something that destroys flowering plants that attract hummingbirds and all sorts of other wildlife the good luck to you.


    I would call that "weeding" - which is something I rarely do.  I would advocate something rich with all sorts of flowering plants. 

    I merely paint a simple picture with the cedars to convey the power of competition.  We can make a landscape that is rich with what we want, and then there is no room for that which we don't want (weeds).

    kcsummer wrote:
    I don't really care for your attitude.


    Most people don't.  I'm cool with that.

    kcsummer wrote:
    You are an "elitist".


    I've been called a lot of things, but this one is new!  Thanks!

    kcsummer wrote:
    I don't view a nice lawn as happiness but if I am going to do something I will do it the best I can and not try ten different times to do it ten different ways.  I'm trying to do a good job this one time.


    Excellent!

    kcsummer wrote:
    And these neighbors of mine you defend don't spend five seconds outside to see the damage their vegetation does so why would they care.  I shouldn't have to cut it down they should.


    It sounds like there is a lot more to the story.

    kcsummer wrote:
    Have a nice life.


    Thanks!


     
    jeremiah bailey
    Posts: 343
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Woah! Easy there!

    Nobody is saying you aren't open minded enough. The fact that you sought this forum is proof of that. You apparently missed a major point that Paul made.

    You can have a beautiful lawn without having to worry about what is growing in your neighbor's yard. In fact, I'll add that to my list of what not to do: disturb your neighbor's flora. It won't do you a bit of good. It'll just grow back and even more tenaciously. The time and effort wasted is yours. If you want to do it right, that is not the way. Focus on making your yard great. Then the neighboring yard will no longer be able to invade if you make your lawn as strong as it can be.

    Whose, fence is it? If it is their's then there is nothing you can do, short of building a taller fence on your side of it with a concrete pad to keep weeds and trees from growing between the two. If it is yours, then you could perhaps take the absentee landlord to court for damages. If he doesn't show, then you get a default judgment, and possibly a lien against his property if he defaults on that judgment. Even if he shows, take pictures and a bring a property survey and you should have a sound case. I used to work for a very scrupulous and involved landlord. He wouldn't have allowed his tenants to do that, or their neighbors. There are ways to deal with "bad" neighbors. Invading their property is not a good way to deal with them. I learned that if you want to deal with bad neighbors, do it legally. Contact your neighborhood code enforcement. They generally like the prospect of imposing a fine for bad yards.

    Keep your head about you, nobody is attacking you. We're just making suggestions as to what we'd do in your situation. You DID ask US for our suggestions, right? Being a good neighbor goes much farther than keeping unwanted plants from spreading to neighboring properties. It also extends to not violating their property in retaliation, which is essentially what you did. I will not sanction that action. Call it defense of your yard if you want. It is not. Move your focus away from your neighbor.

    You don't need desperation in your life, I suggest you lose that as well. You don't need it and it causes you to do things that are counterproductive. Which in turn leads to further desperation. This is not a life or death situation, but you're quickly letting it become something that will lead to you suffering a heart attack or stroke. Nobody here wants to see that.

    You still haven't posted pics, those would be of great help in helping you with this problem.
     
                              
    Posts: 16
    Location: Dover, DE
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    ACK!!! I really wanted to hear the rest of the advice.
     
    jeremiah bailey
    Posts: 343
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Well, where would you like us to start?
     
                              
    Posts: 16
    Location: Dover, DE
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    jeremiah bailey wrote:
    Well, where would you like us to start?


    It's probably not appropriate for me to thread jack this topic. As I mentioned in a different thread, my family is moving soon. So I'll have specific questions about how to manage my own lawn once I actually find out what the issue with that lawn is. For all I know, I could find a house with the lushest, fullest, most amazingly organic lawn in town and the only advice I'd need is to mow high, mow often. 

    For now, I'll bide my time and ask specifics in my own threads as I need.
     
    jeremiah bailey
    Posts: 343
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    lanemik wrote:
    For all I know, I could find a house with the lushest, fullest, most amazingly organic lawn in town and the only advice I'd need is to mow high, mow often. 

    That would be great! Turnkey is the best route, although hard to come by.

    I don't think the person who started this thread would mind if it were jacked though. I haven't heard from him since his temper tantrum. It seems he read Paul's response and left for good, as his last activity was shortly after Paul's post. I do sure hope he's calmed down. All that stress isn't good for the health.
     
                                
    Posts: 41
    Location: Colorado
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Lanemik,

    you should get a copy of "the organic lawn care manual" by Paul Tukey.  It's an easy read and should answer most of your questions.
     
                              
    Posts: 16
    Location: Dover, DE
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    kahunadm wrote:
    Lanemik,

    you should get a copy of "the organic lawn care manual" by Paul Tukey.  It's an easy read and should answer most of your questions.
    That's what brought me to the forums
     
                                
    Posts: 41
    Location: Colorado
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
     
    Dale Hodgins
    gardener
    Posts: 6781
    Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
    263
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    This is one of the funniest and weirdest threads I've come upon. By the time I was 12, I was aware that a savanna stays in grass due to grazing which is sort of like mowing. I was also aware that if any patch vegetation in southern Ontario were cut consistently, a lawn would result. I knew this because I used a lawnmower. There were times when we neglected certain parts of the yard and natural succession would take over some lawn. If we wanted lawn again, it had to be mowed.

    Lawn, in my family has always meant something green underfoot where kids can play and a soccer ball can be kicked. No attention was ever paid to the make up of that plant community except during periods of drought. Whenever drought turned irrigated lawns in town brown, my dad would point out that our mix of weeds and grass was still green without watering.

    I think this lawn culture is uniquely American. When I lived near the American border in Ontario, there were many lawn people but on average there was less fussing than just a mile across the river. I lived in Clarenville Newfoundland for a year. The part of town where people owned lawnmowers was referred to as "snob's hill". Trees and shrubbery dominated the landscape around most homes. Often, animals were allowed to graze or browse around rural homes. Chainsaws, machetes and axes were used to clear around homes that made use of the debris for kindling. wood heat was the norm, except for the wealthiest and poorest. The poorest families burnt oil. This contributed to their plight.

    Here in British Columbia, most lawns do fine with mowing alone. None of the places where I've lived have gone out of their way to control which plants dominate the lawn. When I first move here, we rented a nice place on the ocean that was part of a larger property worth millions. Ted, the owner, mowed whatever came up. He often delayed mowing certain areas according to the lifecycles of various wildflowers. Snowdrops, crocuses, little daisies and dandelions all had their turn and Ted would let the grass get 6 inches tall rather than mow a nice grove of flowers. This patchwork looked something like flower beds. Sometimes he mowed paths along the edges of flower groves and he always mowed a path between his house and ours.

    There are some in the city who fuss over grass, but most people just get a lawn started and then mow whatever nature gives them. It's mostly grass. The Uplands neighborhood of Victoria is one of the nation's wealthiest. Even there, I don't see the same fascination with perfect grass that I witnessed in Niagara Falls New York where homes are worth about 1/20th as much. Historically, lawns with mowed grass were something that only the upper class could afford. Now, we see upscale homes surrounded by nice trees and bushes. Lawns of pure grass without the trees and flowers are rare, except in trailer parks. Some of the greenest, most uniform and sterile lawns are found at trailer parks. This would indicate that the barren lawn as a status symbol is on the wane.
    • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic
    Boost this thread!